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Popcorn And Gluten?
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Before I went gluten-free I could never eat more that one piece of popcorn or else my throat would get sick for lack of a better term. My throat muscles and neck would hurt and I would get this white sheet with white solids in the back of my throat and on my tonsils. Just recently I started eating popcorn again and all these popcorn ill effects are gone, but I don't know why. Anybody know about a link between gluten and popcorn? Anybody else ever experience this negative reaction to popcorn? On a mission....need to know :)

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Don't know of any connection . There's no bad gluten in popcorn.

richard

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Maybe it had something to do with the seasoning on the popcorn?

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Before I went gluten-free I could never eat more that one piece of popcorn or else my throat would get sick for lack of a better term. My throat muscles and neck would hurt and I would get this white sheet with white solids in the back of my throat and on my tonsils. Just recently I started eating popcorn again and all these popcorn ill effects are gone, but I don't know why. Anybody know about a link between gluten and popcorn? Anybody else ever experience this negative reaction to popcorn? On a mission....need to know :)

I had issues with popcorn before going gluten-free as well. What I found out when I was tested for allergies was that I am allergic to corn. I have eliminated it along with soy, dairy, and tomato as well as gluten. Corn is a very common allergen. I would try to avoid it.

BS

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What kind of pop corn were - and are - you eating? Plain? Microwave? Movie? That stuff that comes in the decorated Christmas tins?

Plain is OK. Everything else is suspect. I learned early on that the stuff that comes in the decorated Christmas tins is a major no-no.

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I agree with home based mom. I make my own popcorn in a pan on the stove with a little light olive oil and sea salt. It's very good, and has none of the many ingredients as a lot of the microwave or prepared types.

You could also simply have an intolerance to corn. Can you eat plain corn on the cob?

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...You could also simply have an intolerance to corn...

I am only a month being gluten-free. I thought gluten was my problem, but I have also found that dairy, soy, mushrooms and potatoes, among other things, make me sick. It didn't seem to matter if the popcorn was seasoned or unseasoned, it still made me sick.

I eat a lot of corn tortillas (I trust them to be gluten-free) and I don't seem to get a gluten type reaction from them. Something in my diet is still making me sick and I hope its not corn. Thanks for the comments. Mark

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Mark,

You are still fairly new to the diet. It may take some time before foods "stick". I would concentrate on being gluten free for now and deal with other issues once you are clear of all gluten. Keep things simple for now.

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I was having problems with popcorn, I even was making my own from organic kernals and sea salt! My doctor said that popped corn is tough on the gut to digest. I haven't had problems with any other corn products though.

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Well, since you had to eliminate dairy, I wonder if your popcorn was or is buttered? Some people can handle butter but not milk too.

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I make my own popcorn in a pan on the stove with a little light olive oil and sea salt.

Although the lighter olive oils are supposed to have a higher smoke point than extra virgin, I've found rice brand oil to be far better for popcorn making, as well as other cooking and baking. The smoke point is like 490

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Before I went gluten-free I could never eat more that one piece of popcorn or else my throat would get sick for lack of a better term. My throat muscles and neck would hurt and I would get this white sheet with white solids in the back of my throat and on my tonsils. Just recently I started eating popcorn again and all these popcorn ill effects are gone, but I don't know why. Anybody know about a link between gluten and popcorn? Anybody else ever experience this negative reaction to popcorn? On a mission....need to know :)

my vote is you're allergic to corn

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Before I went gluten-free I could never eat more that one piece of popcorn or else my throat would get sick for lack of a better term. My throat muscles and neck would hurt and I would get this white sheet with white solids in the back of my throat and on my tonsils. Just recently I started eating popcorn again and all these popcorn ill effects are gone, but I don't know why. Anybody know about a link between gluten and popcorn? Anybody else ever experience this negative reaction to popcorn? On a mission....need to know :)

I used to get sick with the microwavable popcorns and didn't even realize it. After I started popping my own, it doesn't bother me at all so maybe that's why. Plus, look at all the chemicals added to the bagged popcorns. Some of them are used in resins and table polish :blink:

For a quick way to pop corn..and it might also be considered lazy (depends on your view point) but put the corn kernals in a brown bag with 1/2 tbsp of oil. Shake it so that the popcorn gets coated then staple the bag with one staple in the center. Put it in the microwave for the maximum of 3 minutes as some microwave/popcorn varieties vary and pop. See you have your own healthy, chemically safe, "microwavable" popcorn :D

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For a quick way to pop corn..and it might also be considered lazy (depends on your view point) but put the corn kernals in a brown bag with 1/2 tbsp of oil. Shake it so that the popcorn gets coated then staple the bag with one staple in the center. Put it in the microwave for the maximum of 3 minutes as some microwave/popcorn varieties vary and pop. See you have your own healthy, chemically safe, "microwavable" popcorn :D

I always heard never to put oil in the bag, as it can catch fire. I also heard that it works better to use two bags, doubled up (one inside the other). Anyway, I never got very good results with this, and even the name brand ones don't seem to pop as well as the good ol' stainless steel pot on the stove.

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Before I went gluten-free I could never eat more that one piece of popcorn or else my throat would get sick for lack of a better term. My throat muscles and neck would hurt and I would get this white sheet with white solids in the back of my throat and on my tonsils. Just recently I started eating popcorn again and all these popcorn ill effects are gone, but I don't know why. Anybody know about a link between gluten and popcorn? Anybody else ever experience this negative reaction to popcorn? On a mission....need to know :)

My guess would be that you used to have a corn allergy, but thanks to gut healing from gluten-free you've outgrown the allergy, or at least it's become far more mild than it used to be.

It's also possible that you used to have popcorn contaminated with other allergens, but now that you're gluten-free you're being more careful to only eat "pure" popcorn.

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I've read all the replies...and I don't really have an answer.

But, I do know for certain that the "artificial butter flavor" used in the movie theaters DOES contain gluten. So, it's off limits.

Just thought I'd throw that in....even though it's not really relevant to the topic.

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I've read all the replies...and I don't really have an answer.

But, I do know for certain that the "artificial butter flavor" used in the movie theaters DOES contain gluten. So, it's off limits.

Just thought I'd throw that in....even though it's not really relevant to the topic.

That I never knew, where did you get that info? I am not questioning it, I just cannot believe it. We actually do not go to the movies often, they got way too pricey, and that is before snacks and such.

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For years I just knew that popcorn gave me gut pain. My theory now is that the hard and sharp seed cases hurt the gut because it was chronically inflammed. I now eat popcorn with no problem at all. I make my own on the stove with a metal basket that you shake over the element. No oil at all! (although I do add melted margarine and salt after) And now that I have happy guts, I can eat it anytime.

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Speaking of popcorn...tonight my husband and I bought the Whirly-Pop popper found at Bed, Bath & Beyond. We also bought the "Real Theater Popcorn" for it made by the same company. I read the ingredients: popcorn, coconut oil, salt, beta carotene, NATURAL and artificial butter flavor. Anyone know what the natural flavor is derived from? Thanks. :rolleyes:

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I am only a month being gluten-free. I thought gluten was my problem, but I have also found that dairy, soy, mushrooms and potatoes, among other things, make me sick. It didn't seem to matter if the popcorn was seasoned or unseasoned, it still made me sick.

I eat a lot of corn tortillas (I trust them to be gluten-free) and I don't seem to get a gluten type reaction from them. Something in my diet is still making me sick and I hope its not corn. Thanks for the comments. Mark

I'm surprised no one has mentioned cross-contamination. From what I understand, this is fairly common with plain popcorn (not microwaved). Correct me if I'm wrong there. The only two kinds I've checked on were cross-contaminated, anyway. Let me know of any that aren't. I'm still looking.

Also, from what I understand, many corn tortillas are also either cross-contaminated or contain a gluten ingredient. The only ones I know for sure are safe are the Mission brand ones. All mission brand corn products are free of gluten and cross-contamination.

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I've read all the replies...and I don't really have an answer.

But, I do know for certain that the "artificial butter flavor" used in the movie theaters DOES contain gluten. So, it's off limits.

Just thought I'd throw that in....even though it's not really relevant to the topic.

This is untrue from everything I've ever heard. Please provide a source for this.

richard

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Before I went gluten-free I could never eat more that one piece of popcorn or else my throat would get sick for lack of a better term. My throat muscles and neck would hurt and I would get this white sheet with white solids in the back of my throat and on my tonsils. Just recently I started eating popcorn again and all these popcorn ill effects are gone, but I don't know why. Anybody know about a link between gluten and popcorn? Anybody else ever experience this negative reaction to popcorn? On a mission....need to know :)

This may be of some help & remove some questions about Smart Balance popcorn. I went to their company website & looked under which Smart Balance products are gluten free, the answer they have posted for all to see is-all Smart Balance products are gluten free.

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