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Childrens Behaivor


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#16 Guest_April Walker_*

 
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Posted 20 February 2008 - 06:31 AM

Yes Dennis,

I can tell you it does take some time to process the suffering and blame of the victim. It is a societal pattern to do so. The real you is finally able to be alive and free of the illness that previously bound you. The real you will establish a new and better life, with people that you choose fully conscious. Illness does teach us a great deal, about others, we learn who our true friends are along the journey. It is as if you have been given a second chance in life, a chance to feel good, and to reach for your dreams.

I continue to be amazed at people who see my son now and say wow your really working with him now and it is so amazing the change. I have to bite my tongue as I have always worked with him, it is just that now we have some of the answers. You have always been who you are seeing now, you just did not have the answers to your health then.

April
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#17 rick_spiff

 
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Posted 12 March 2008 - 05:29 AM

My son was on adhd drugs until his seizure right after Christmas. Did eeg & allergy testing and he's allergic to gluten/gladin, dairy, eggs, peanuts and beef.


He has improved some but he is very defiant and we think that's because he's limited on his diet and he feels like he's lost control. Still new to this only a month and a half but he's off meds and still doing alright, struggling a bit in school and socially.


Just nice to hear i'm not the only one....
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Whole family is allergic to Gluten, eggs, dairy, most are allergic to garlic. Few other various allergies.


Did you know it's best to wait until 21 months to give a baby wheat??

#18 jayhawkmom

 
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Posted 12 March 2008 - 05:47 AM

My "Aspie" son was on the gluten-free diet for a year... with absolutely NO benefits at all. His doctors all agreed to allow gluten since we saw no benefit, and his diet is extremely self limited due to sensory issues.

On the other hand.... my daughter, who is dairy, egg, nut, soy, gluten free still has behavioral "differences" and our team of doctors are already saying she's probably an "Aspie" as well. It's inherited... as my husband also has Aspergers. I don't know what else I could possibly take out of my daughter's diet to help improve her behavioral issues.

9/10 days... she's great. But, when she's having difficulties, it affects everyone around her. And, it's maddening at times.
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Jayhawkmom -
Mom of three....
Jay - 11
Bean - 8
Ian - 3

#19 rick_spiff

 
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Posted 12 March 2008 - 10:25 AM

I just read a bio about asperger's. He stated that he has a special diet too, don't remember if he stated specifics, but he did say that once he eliminated certain foods his asperger's was most definetely a lot better.


Good Luck! I'll look at the book again, but i can imagine it's pretty difficult. I read that it hasn't been a diagnosed disease for that long and unfortunetely there isn't a lot of books about it.

he lists this site www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/
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Whole family is allergic to Gluten, eggs, dairy, most are allergic to garlic. Few other various allergies.


Did you know it's best to wait until 21 months to give a baby wheat??

#20 jayhawkmom

 
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Posted 12 March 2008 - 10:43 AM

I read that it hasn't been a diagnosed disease for that long and unfortunetely there isn't a lot of books about it.

he lists this site www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/


Asperger's isn't a disease. It's a neurobiological issue. Semantics, perhaps... but I just had to make that statement.

I'm actually doing a research paper on the "invisibility" issue. Lots of kids with Aspergers appear to be totally "normal" to those on the outside. It's only those of us on the inside who are privileged to know their true selves. It can be a curse and a gift, at the same time. My son could benefit greatly from occupational therapy, and he did benefit from it for 3 years. But, now... he's much older and he does extremely well in school (straight A student - gifted in math) so no one really "cares" that fireworks scare the tar out of him, that he can't yet ride a bike or tie his shoes, or properly eat with utensils. Those things are all "secondary" to the powers that be. Yet.... try as we may, we can't "teach" him these things. The educational system says he's "just fine" since his test scores aren't affected by his differences.
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Jayhawkmom -
Mom of three....
Jay - 11
Bean - 8
Ian - 3

#21 AliB

 
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Posted 19 March 2008 - 04:24 PM

Please check out the Pecanbread website. It is geared for children with Autism and ASD using the SC Diet and great results are being achieved - up to 100% success in some clinics. The Diet is also very helpful for children with behavioral and other problems also caused by food intolerance and adults with varied problems, not only celiac but other bowel and stomach related disorders, mental problems, anxiety and depression - well, just about anything you can think of.

There is lots of information and tips, recipes etc. I have found it to be a great resource. There is plenty of good information for children, parents and teachers and the page that describes what is happening in the gut geared in three ways for children, parents and health professionals is extremely useful.

http://www.pecanbread.com
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Ali - 50 - struggled with what I now know to be GI symptoms and poor carb digestion for at least 35 years! Diabetic type II (1997). Mother undx Celiac - lifelong diabetic Type 1 & anemic (plus 1 stillborn and 10 miscarriages after me). Father definitely very GI.

Stopped gluten & dairy, Jan 08, but still other issues so dropped most carbs and sugar and have been following the Specific Carb Diet (SCD) since March 08. Recovery slow but steady and I can now eat a much broader range of foods especially raw which are good for my digestion and boost my energy level.

Not getting better? Try the SCD - it might just change your life.........

#22 adhdwarrior

 
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Posted 01 May 2008 - 07:46 AM

hello. I am new here and I am, quite frankly, losing my mind right now :huh: I don't know much about celiac disease and I don't know if my son could have that or not......but..well..here's the "lowdown":

My son is 10 and we have been on the ADHD roller coaster since he was in Kindergarten. He has been on all the psycho-stimulant drugs and built a tolerance to every one of them--not to mention he has a growth hormone deficiency and the stimulant compounded that problem.
In desperation, I decided to take matters into my own hands, forget the drugs, and research alternative treatments...and found that chiropractic was the best way to go for us...we have seen major improvements with adjustments alone, but still were struggling so the chiro ordered igG and igE testing.... and OMG! My son had igE (immediate) reactions to Wheat, Milk, and Egg whites....he had a high igG (delayed) response to GLUTEN! TO make matters much worse...he even has moderate igG reactions to corn, yeast, rye, safflower, mustard, malt, cheeses, yogurt (dairy, DUH!)and soybean! SO, no soy milk..no bread made with rye or corn.....and the rice breads I have been able to find online are made with safflower oil! EVERYTHING he loves to eat is now off limits...what am I going to do? I don't know what to feed him and he cries that he can't have pop-tarts, cereal, pizza, lasagna, spaghetti, breads, cakes, cookies, etc. I have searched for alternatives and substitutes but can't find ANYTHING completely free of all his allergens. He does love beans, steak, and chicken---but not without the seasonings and trimmings! Please tell me A-1 sauce is gluten free! Even then, I have to make sure it doesn't contain the other stuff! :( Can anybody help me? I think I'll eventually be able to find enough ways to prepare foods that he will be ABLE to eat..but how can I convince him to LIKE them?
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#23 missy'smom

 
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Posted 01 May 2008 - 10:06 AM

You might be able to use DariFree. It is a non-dairy powder that can be used in baked goods or as is. Just add water.
You can substitute potato starch for the cornstarch in a gluten-free flour blend.
You might be able to use Ener-G Egg replacer. It is a powder. Some people use a flax seed based egg replacer. I haven't used it myself.
The Tinkyada pasta that I have is just made from rice, rice bran and water. It even comes in kid friendly shapes.

With the replacements above, I'll bet you can make a banana bread.

Check the Namaste mixes. They are free of many allergens and are very good.
https://www.namastef...i?Category=Home

When you find a cake or bread that works, find different ways to use and serve it. That builds in variety.

Take ingredients that he already likes and work with those. If it helps, make a list and post it on the fridge,of all the fruits, veg, meats etc. that he likes and/or can have and start from that when you make meals. Think ingredients, not dishes. Sometimes it is easier to start with what you CAN have. I've done this in the past. Once in a while add in a new ingredient or serve it a different way. If you can get him to like a variety of fruits and vegetables that'll help alot. Introduce new ones in small quantity not only to him but to the family and if it doesn't go over the first time, don't cross it off the list forever. I got my son to eat tomatoes because I grew them myself last year. He still will only eat those from our garden! but that's OK. If possible, make simple meals for the whole family that he can eat too. Kids are more open to new things if they see the family eating those things and it helps them accept the changes. It's a process. Many of our families have gone gluten-free with us.
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Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11
Son: ADHD '06,
neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07
ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08
ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08
Gluten-free-Feb. '09
other food allergies

#24 swalker

 
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Posted 22 June 2008 - 08:49 AM

My 9 y.o. son has been off wheat for 6 years and yet we continue to have these angry behavior issues. He has been skin tested for allergies but I didn't realize his behavior may be related to other food issues. Where do I go for blood testing for allergies? I don't think his allergist will do blood testing. The volcanic, lava flowing from his head, unreasonable anger episodes are what led me to remove gluten from his diet when he was litte, based on the fact that his father was diagnosed with celiac disease. He seems unable to calm himself down in the heat of the moment, even given warnings that loss of priviledges will result if he continues ranting. He is always sorry later and wants to earn them back. I was considering taking him to a child psycologist to get some tools for him to handle his anger. maybe I should consider additional allergy testing first? I'm almost afraid to hear the answer though. He already is limited in what he is willing to eat and is overweight (BMI 26).

cheryl in colorado


The Explosive Child by Ross W Greene is a great book! We are still working on our four year olds intolerances through elimination but this book was invaluable for dealing with his rage.
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#25 Lizz7711

 
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Posted 28 June 2008 - 06:57 PM

My 9 y.o. son has been off wheat for 6 years and yet we continue to have these angry behavior issues. He has been skin tested for allergies but I didn't realize his behavior may be related to other food issues. Where do I go for blood testing for allergies? I don't think his allergist will do blood testing. The volcanic, lava flowing from his head, unreasonable anger episodes are what led me to remove gluten from his diet when he was litte, based on the fact that his father was diagnosed with celiac disease. He seems unable to calm himself down in the heat of the moment, even given warnings that loss of priviledges will result if he continues ranting. He is always sorry later and wants to earn them back. I was considering taking him to a child psycologist to get some tools for him to handle his anger. maybe I should consider additional allergy testing first? I'm almost afraid to hear the answer though. He already is limited in what he is willing to eat and is overweight (BMI 26).

cheryl in colorado


Cheryl,

I would highly recommend you check out the feingold website, feingold.org. My daughter goes into totally unreasonable rages as response to gluten, but also to food dyes (esp. red#40 and yellow, and these colors are in SO many foods and drinks), and also to aspartame and MSG. If all you are focusing on is the gluten, then he's probably still getting lots of artificial and dangerous additives. He most likely has a leaky gut which is why these molecules are escaping the intestine and going through the blood-brain barrier and affective his mood etc. Allergy testing may not, in fact will not, pick up or even test for, these kinds of problems with food additives. The feingold website has lots of good information for free, and then if you pay a small fee they will send you more info and you can access their forum etc. I think there is enough of the free info to get you started though. They are big on salicilates, these are naturally occuring toxins on fruits and vegetables that some people are sensitive to. personally, i'd start with cutting down on dairy, soy, and the artificial colors and MSG and aspartame (in diet drinks and gum). Then if he's still having problems i'd look into salicylates (mydaughter does seem to react to red grapes).

hope this helps, good luck!
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Liz

Positive enterolab results 11/07:
-antigliadin IgA: 56 (normal <10)
-antitissue tTG IgA: 39 (normal <10)
-anti-casein IgA: 34 (normal <10)
-HLA-DQ: 2,1 (2,6)
Positive blood test IgA and IgG 12/07
Gluten-free Casein-free since 12/07
mostly soy free since 12/07
Diagnosed with adrenal fatigue 08/07
Diagnosed hypothyroid 01/08
Still have mercury fillings, high mercury and lead
Multiple chemical sensitivities

9 year old daughter positive enterolab test for gluten, casein, soy and egg with HLA-DQ 3,1 (7,6)--mostly exhibits behavioral reactions to foods including food dyes, MSG, aspartame

Mother passed away 3 years ago of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary. Two years prior had diarrhea causing her to weigh 86 pounds...Mayo clinic told her to take pepto bismol. NO test for celiac, lifelong hx of ulcers, osteoporosis. I now know she had the celiac gene (my dad has DQ1) and was probably undiagnosed her whole life.

#26 munchkinette

 
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Posted 13 July 2008 - 07:46 AM

Interestingly enough, my psychiatrist is really the only specialist I have who fully recognizes that I am gluten intolerant (as opposed to just allergic), mainly because he's been with me long enough to see the before and after. I was on anti-depressants off and on for most of my adult life, since maybe age 19. My ADD started getting really bad a few years before I went gluten-free. I was taking two ritalin every day for 3 years while I was in grad school. A month after graduation was when I first went gluten free.

Since six months after going gluten-free (2 years ago) I have taken no anti-depressants and maybe 15 ritalin pills, mostly within a week after being glutened. Now that I'm more sensitive, the difference is more pronounced right after a glutening and I really can't get through the week without my ritalin. I definitely can't drive after a glutening because of the brain fog. On the other hand, ritalin makes me really jumpy when I'm not having gluten issues, and that's usually a sign that people don't need the drug.
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Gluten free since Feb 2006, Dairy and Soy free since 2009

Anemic off and on since 2003
Negative tTG Ab, IgA, Gliadin Ab IgA, wheat allergy (IgE) blood tests (Feb 2006)
Positive wheat allergy skin test(Apr 2006)and dietary response (Feb 2006)
Celiac grandmother (Dx in 1940s, "grew out of it")

Training for my first triathlon to support the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America.

~Amy

#27 mosaicmom

 
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Posted 12 September 2008 - 04:00 PM

Type in keywords "The Celiac Brain". There is so much out there about Celiac and behavioral problems. It's what helped the nurse practitioner (in retrospect) to immediately look for Celiacs (mental health issue).
Gluten free is big in the Autism and ADHD circuits. Start typing in key words, and use learning disability (adhd is one) but if you apply the information from the celiac brain to what you're reading and then go by a list of each disorder + gluten in a search, you'll be AMAZED at what you find.
It's a neurotoxin for these poor kids.

I've got a 17 yr old who recognizes this in herself now too, and her mental health issues were pretty severe.
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#28 momofboys05

 
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Posted 20 September 2008 - 07:08 AM

Welcome, April. :)

My gosh, you might as well have been writing about ME in that paragraph.......this is exactly my behavior - and it got so much worse. As a girl, my mom would ask me to do something - empty the dishwasher, clean my room - and I would scream and cry and it would take forever....as an adult I realized jsut how jumbling and confusing everything was - - and how difficult it was to do any task requiring order. Your boy is SO fortunate he was diagnosed young.....my dx came at 44 years of age and......lots of damage done. But - the good part is - life inside my brain has never been better. :)

Congrats on your accomplishments - life without gluten will continue to improve. Am wondering if your meds after surgery contained gluten.......




this is a HORRIBLE epidemic in America....I have friends who teach and are facing impossible situations, every child on ineffective ADD drugs, with non-vigilant and uninformed parents who don't care much, and all the while, living on nearly complete fast food and junk food diets......and the sad thing is, not only will parents/authorities not listen to us about the dangers of their wretched diets, they can't afford to feed them properly anyway. (well - they probably could - - cutting out all the junk foods could save quite a bit of money. They just would never consider doing anything like this, or muster the discipline required to do it.)

We just have to keep getting the word out as much as possible.






My son is 7 yrs old and has ADHD. We dont have alot of junk in our house nor do we let our kids have it. He is on a medication called vyvance and it has calmed him down, but he still has other issuies. He saw a Pedi-Gi spelicalist yesterday and she believes that he has Celiac Disease. He still is having bathroom issuies where he will have pooped in his pants and not tell anyone. He used to lie about having accidents when asked. He also has a hard time falling asleep at nite, and used to get up in the middle of the nite and get into foood. He weighs 34 lbs and is 43" tall. He hasnt grown or gained weight in 2 months. I have had soo many dr apt and so many people that are proffesionals and they all have different opions on whats wrong with him.
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#29 DanaDee

 
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Posted 08 October 2008 - 04:42 AM

I am an elementary teacher, and I've taught for thirty years. Why would teachers believe parents talking about this issue? It isn't common knowlege--even the doctors don't believe patients when we talk about celiac/allergies/etc., and especially if it is connected to behavior.
I have the opposite problem, however. I am seeing an increasing number of children with odd behaviors and health problems. We call in specialists and run tests and have endless meetings. Sometimes the child goes on ADHD medications, but it doesn't solve things. A lot of the children are diagnosed as Aspergers. Some of them are lucky enough to get personal aides to help them. As a celiac teacher I keep thinking that maybe the child is celiac, or has other food or environmental sensitivities, but can I say that to parents? Will they listen? Will they be upset? I am not (in my district) allowed to recommend medications or mention attention deficit problems to parents--they have to come up with it themselves. Am I allowed to mention this?
I noted the resources you already mentioned and will check them out. Does anyone know others I might refer parents to?

Your school psychologist, when reporting their findings usually suggests to parents if they see behaviors that may warrent a trip to the Docs office, I would talk to them to see if you can get them onboard about educating parents. Educating, not recommending. I am a Guidance Counselor, I tell my own personal story and show bite marks. I don't tell parents what to do, but I mention that it could be health/food related, get a physical and allgery tests done. Why wouldn't you rule out health/food reactions reasons before medicating a kid. I think it's unethical for a doc to just medicate without complete blood labs.
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#30 DanaDee

 
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Posted 08 October 2008 - 04:45 AM

this is a HORRIBLE epidemic in America....I have friends who teach and are facing impossible situations, every child on ineffective ADD drugs, with non-vigilant and uninformed parents who don't care much, and all the while, living on nearly complete fast food and junk food diets......and the sad thing is, not only will parents/authorities not listen to us about the dangers of their wretched diets, they can't afford to feed them properly anyway. (well - they probably could - - cutting out all the junk foods could save quite a bit of money. They just would never consider doing anything like this, or muster the discipline required to do it.)

We just have to keep getting the word out as much as possible.
[/quote]

Also, its Docs who just quick write a prescription instead of exploring other things. SHAME on THEM. They hold the power, they could educate parents. There is money in the midical community, but pharmaceutical companies trump that. A parent goes to the docs, says my son/daughter has ADHD, an in the initial visit, they leave with a script for a drug. SHAME on them. Parent's aren't told better by most docs.
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