Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Sunbeam Breadmaker
0

10 posts in this topic

Hi there,

as I figured, my mother-in-law gave me a breadmachine christmas. I already read the manual and I also read the advices about breadmachines in the glouten gourmet book I got. And I have the strange feeling, I can't make good gluten-free breads with this machine. This sunbeam breadmachine kneads the dough two times and I heard this isn't that good with our dough. It also has expressbake settings, but it doesn't say, if this leaves one kneading process out or not. I read in previous postings, that the expressbake setting could leave one kneading process out. But is this so with every bread machine?

The next thing, that I read in the glutenfree cookbook was, that the paddle(s) should be large and NOT dough-hook-shaped. And it shouldn't be a short thick paddle and if so, the dough should be mixed outside the pan or use a rubber spatula to stir the dough as it is mixing. How large is large? And what is dough-hoo-shaped??? I think mine has a short thick paddle, but it's not possible to mix it outside or stir the dough, while it is mixing. This machine mixes on it's own and while it's mixing you can't open the lid, otherwise you have to start all over again.

I also can't cut out the "stir down" or the second rising. I need help!!!

Stef

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I read a lot b4 buying one recently and every expressbake-type option i saw was accomplished by skipping 2nd knead/rise.

So far i've made little mistakes 2 of the 3x i made bread, but it all turned out great.

My paddle is small and w/ a 30-40 degree angle in it, and watching it work (lil window) i can't see what could be done better w/ a different paddle.

Also both my mom and sister make good gluten-free bread w/ machines that are years old, and neither has single knead/rise settings. Maybe something w/ Bob's Red Mill gluten-free mix makes perfect optimization unnecessary ? Same mix for all of us.

Your book should have a chart of the times used for each diff program included. The ones i saw showed that the fastbake cycle always skipped 2nd knead/rise. ANd if it doesn't, u can get good bread w/ Bob's "wonderful gluten-free" mix, even w/ 2nd knead/rise.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I often use the rapid setting on my machine with gives two kneading processes but only a short rest between the two. It works great with my favorite bread recipe. I also have used the quick setting with has only one kneading process (but a 5 min longer bake cycle...which is too long for my recipe) so generally I use the rapid setting. I've also unplugged my machine before the baking turns on in order to allow a new recipe to rise longer, then replug it in and set it to just the bake setting (starts baking right away.)

Take a look in the manual. Try a good gluten-free bread (like Bob's which is very forgiving.) If it flops, give a call to you MIL and ask if she would mind if you take it back to the store and replace it with another breadmachine type. I did this with two different brands before I found one I liked (but, like Tom said, you may find it works just fine for you. Mine isn't an uber expensive one with all the bells and whistles, just the Oster brand. Every time I try something new with it, I learn a little more about how to use it more efficiently for myself.) The stores (and the young clerks managing the counter) generally don't care why anyone returns things (especially big store like Target.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband totally surprised me with a new bread machine for Christmas (He is very understanding of me and this disease.) I have a gluten-free loaf baking as we speak so we'll see how it turns out. It is a Toastmaster TBR15. Everywhere he went looking for one, he was told by many salespersons they will not be carrying bread machines anymore because no one buys them. Hmmmm. Will let you know how it turns out. :ph34r:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bread turned out tasting great!!! My new machine made a smaller loaf than my old Toastmaster, but the bread is good and holds together. Sorry, though, the recipe I used has both eggs and yeast. :unsure:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Hello everyone, I'm not sure if any of you have the answer, but if you could help me out with what I may have done wrong that would be great! I purchased a Breadman breadmaker, since it was a great sale price at Target, because I had read that many people make wonderful gluten free breads in the breadmakers, and mine in the oven have been flops. Anyhow, I used the super rapid rise cycle like I've read since it only kneads once. I did not however use the rapid rise yeast (maybe this was my problem?) My problem was, when it was the machine stopped baking because it was "done" the bread still looked like it needed another 30 minutes baking. I could not figure out how to set a time to continue baking, and looked in the manual and there is nothing saying how to continue baking if your bread isn't done. I'm getting so frustrated I'm about to give up on all of this and take the machine back! I set it for the correct size of loaf, but I don't know how just by not using rapid rise yeast, would cause the bread to not be even half done when its supppose to be...

Rachel

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Rachel. I have a Breadman TR2200C model ("ultimate" is somewhere on the box in BIG letters) but i've only used it w/ a mix. Mine makes a big deal about having all ingred at room temp b4 starting, which i suppose could be more of an issue on a rapid cycle.

But i too don't know about the yeast or how it could be responsible.

Lastly, it'd be a shame to take the machine back w/out at least getting one tasty gluten-free loaf out. Bob's Red Mill makes a mix named "Wonderful gluten-free Bread" and they ain't lyin'.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Tom, I don't think mines the Ultimate one...but it did make a big deal about the ingredients being room temp. and they were, would that contribute to a way underdone loaf? I'll give there consumer services phone line a call tomarrow and ask if they have any suggestions...

Rachel

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does your breadmaker have a "BAKE" setting? A couple times I had to unplug my machine and let the bread rise longer. Then I just set it to "BAKE" and it immediately starts baking. (I also accidentally hit the button once and it deflated my perfect loaf. I was so upset I ran upstairs ranting like a maniac :huh: so don't do that, it's embarrassing.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mines the TR846, and it doesn't have a bake setting...would letting it rise longer have any effect on the bread still being dough when its suppose to be done?? Grrah I thought the bread machine was suppose to make things easier : (, I'm going to call the consumer service line tomarrow,and hopefully they can help me, maybe theres something I can do to set it so it bakes longer, I looked in the manual and there was nothing of that sort...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,090
    • Total Posts
      920,307
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi, No, I do not have celiac  disease. I have an ankylosing spondylitis which is an auto-immune disease provoking an inflammation of the joints. Under the advice and supervision of my doctor and the professor at the hospital I follow a gluten free & casein free diet, which is extremely successful in preventing inflammatory events. And I've been doing so, strictly, for more than 6 years. So I'm not Celiac, but I can tell you that I react strongly every time I take gluten even in small amounts. Even soya sauce, which according to this website has an almost zero dose of gluten, is a lot too much for me. Nevertheless I allow myself to eat food which has been processed in a factory which processes gluten. To conclude, I would say that when you are travelling, especially in a country where celiac disease is scarcely known, you should be twice as careful as when you're going out at home. In the end you can never guarantee that the cook has cleaned his pan after using soya sauce and so on... You can only bet
    • Along those lines, many Americans are now pursuing gluten-free eating. Gluten ... Diagnosis of celiac disease typically requires a history and physical ... View the full article
    • No!  Once you fill the tub, if you sit in it for 3 minutes or you stay for 10... It doesn't change the amount or cost of the water.  That's only relevant if you have 3 kids to cycle thru that same water.  Is your hub bathing in the same water after you? Lol  And even if you add some more hot and stay longer....well...it's much cheaper than perscription meds, vodka or a substance that is legal in a few states.     Of course this only pertains to those of use with running water.... If you make your hub haul water from the creek or well and heat it over a fire....
    • Whether it is bona fide dermatitis herpetiformis, or severe eczema or hives or what have you, we all want to know how to stop the incessant itching.  Through all my research, the solution comes down to one thing: a good long soak in the tub-- with baking soda or Epsom salts or some kind of herbal tea, followed by a rub down in thick expensive lotion.  I don't know about you, but I was brought up to "get in, get done get out."  A long soak in the bath was a frivolous luxury, and a waste of time and hot water.  So now I'm having this awful breakout from forgetting to read a label and got wheated.  And every night I've been soaking in a baking soda bath to relieve the itching and aid my recovery.  And it's been hard! (But it's been very helpful too)  It has been hard to reconcile this "frivolous luxury and waste of time" as medically necessary!  Fortunately I've had no judging, and only support from my husband, who has had a similar upbringing.  Does anyone else struggle with this?
    • His son, Eli, had been misdiagnosed with celiac disease, so the family tried some gluten-free foods. After adding quinoa (KEEN-wah) to their diet, ... View the full article
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • HappyMom623

      I have Tangled problem! I want all the things Rapunzel Related....including Flynn Rider 😂 but seriously. I have like 8 shirts I want.
      · 0 replies
    • AprilBeth2013

      RT @MarkDever: “But the work is God’s and we do not fear the final results. ‘The heathen shall be given to His Son for His inheritance,’ .…
      · 0 replies
    • silk

      I have celiac disease and have been gluten-free for almost 10 years.  I am extremely sensitive to gluten, noting that I react within 15 minutes of contact and in fact the doctor suspects that there may also be an actual wheat allergy at play but have never bothered to be tested since I avoid it like the plague!  I am curious to know if anyone else reacts to flax or inulin?  My symptoms with those two are almost identical to gluten so I have to really watch for that in gluten-free breads and baking and recently discovered after the fact that flax was in the juice I was drinking. I know that people with gluten issues can have other problems as well and in fact I also avoid milk products.  Even after 10 years, and although it has become a way of life, it's still frustrating to have to read every ingredient on every label.😞
      · 2 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,115
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    3boymommy
    Joined