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Gf With Celiac


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#1 Derek

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 01:23 PM

My girlfriend has Celiacs, and she told me about it early on when we started dating. We have only been going out for a couple months, but she seems to handle it fairly well. I would say the biggest problem, which now that I read more I see that I am no help, is with cheating. I think she cheats more meals than not, and I think I should start being more active in preventing it. I know she would listen to me, and I know I can find other restaraunts, but I am also still adjusting to exactly what has what she cant eat, and so on.

I am no stranger to diseases like this, I have Crohns disease, which is a digestive affecting disease, that is pretty serious. I am not very limited on the foods I eat like with Celiac, even though there are some things that cause me pain. The problem with Crohns isnt triggered by food, its just always there, and has the bright and sunny side affect of a very painful death if it ever kicks into full blast (which was its state when I was first diagnosed, and had to have emergency surgery) and not quickly treated.

So even though I dont HAVE Celiac's, I am probably the closest relative to what its like.

That is why I want to take a stronger stance on the foods she eats, because I read here how some of you have paid for cheating, and I dont want that for her. She is almost done with her first four years of college, and I want her last semester to be trouble-free.

What we eat, isnt healthy by any standards, disease or not, we eat fast food somewhat often (usually just because of late night, nothing else is open kind of stuff), but not always. I want to find out what is safe to eat at some of these fast food places, and wasnt sure if anyone here could give me any ideas on that.

Also, how hard is it to get information like this from a sit down restaurant before going?

Anyway, sorry this is so long, thanks for reading it, and any advice I can get!
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#2 celiac3270

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 02:26 PM

That is why I want to take a stronger stance on the foods she eats, because I read here how some of you have paid for cheating, and I dont want that for her. She is almost done with her first four years of college, and I want her last semester to be trouble-free.

What we eat, isnt healthy by any standards, disease or not, we eat fast food somewhat often (usually just because of late night, nothing else is open kind of stuff), but not always. I want to find out what is safe to eat at some of these fast food places, and wasnt sure if anyone here could give me any ideas on that.
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Also, how hard is it to get information like this from a sit down restaurant before going?


That's really caring/nice of you to be interested in taking an active role in this and helping her.

If you're going to eat fastfood, I'd advise you to eat at McDonalds. Assuming that you live in the USA, here is the gluten-free lists for all USA McDonalds restaurants: McD's gluten-free list.

I'm not sure about other fastfood places cause the only one I will eat at is McD's. You must be careful while there that the staff cooperates if you ask for a bunless burger. Make sure they don't just take the bun off of one, cause the crumbs from the bun are enough to cause significant damage to her intestines. The french fries should be safe, but I always make sure they're in a designated fryer or one used for fries and another gluten-free food.

About sit-down restaurants, I would advise you to call ahead. They've very likely dealt with people with allergies or other celiacs before. I find that the restaurants try to be very accomodating. Once there, whether you've called ahead or not, I would advise you (or your girlfriend) to talk to the chef if possible. This way you can explain the side effects to gluten ingestion and the necessary precautions the chef must take (for example, that he/she can't use a knife or spatula or something that has already touched gluten-containing ingredients, etc.). Don't feel bad about exaggerating because people need to take it seriously. You could also bring a restaurant card to give to the waiter to give to the chef.

-celiac3270
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#3 tom

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 11:32 PM

For fastfood, i've had better luck w/ Carl's Jr than McDs.
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>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03
Dairy-free since 10-04
Soy-free since 5-07

#4 tarnalberry

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 12:15 AM

That's very nice of you to care about what she eats. Unfortunately, she has to make the committment to her health for herself, or she won't necessarily stick with it. Of course, making it easier on her by doing what footwork you're willing to do may help her feel more comfortable with it.

I far prefer cooking at home - it's cheapier, tastier, exactly what you want, and doesn't have to take any longer (for some things...). There's also no risk of getting contamination if you're cooking from safe ingredients in a safe kitchen. When that's not an option, it's nice to have places that you've taken the time to talk to when they're not busy. For instance, Outback and PF Changs both have gluten-free menus already, but places like Buca Di Beppo may not have one printed, but if you email them ahead of time, they'll let you know what they can make friendly. (My term for "gluten free for the celiac" ;-) ) For non-chains, you'll want to call during a slow time, and ask to speak to the manager or chef. Going in in-person would be even better. Writing down and keeping a copy of the possibilities will give you two, in essence, your own personal set of menus.

I still encourage you to get into the habit of healthy cooking (it's a habit for a long lifetime), but as far as restaurants go (including checking out the section on this message board), there's nothing that beats the legwork, unfortunately.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
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#5 jendenise

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 11:11 AM

Not sure wher you live but if you have wendy's and Burger King they have some gluten-free food, you can go to their websites to get the lists. Also, maybe the 2 of you could make a weekend of gluten-free shopping and either make some meals ahead of time that you could freeze and then eat whenever you get hungry or find microwaveable meals. My fiancee and I live off velveeta and rice shells for myself regular for him. Also, maybe you could buy some gluten-free stuff to keep at your place maybe if she sees you that involved and realizes how much of an effort you make she'll be more willing (that's what my fiancee did when we were first dating and I love him so much more for caring that much). Overall it takes her wanting to be completely gluten-free to do it, but your support and caring for her will absolutely make a difference. Good job! Why don't you go to Amys.com she can order gluten-free food from their site, and it's the best...
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