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Potato/ Nightshade Intolerance


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#1 covsooze

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Posted 02 March 2008 - 11:29 AM

I seem to have a problem with most nightshades as they all, with the exception of potatoes, make my stomach feel 'raw'. Tomatoes give me a mild oral allergic reaction as well. I've suspected for a while that potatoes might be an issue too, although I haven't been able to track down any particular reaction, except that they are the one food that I feel I really couldn't live without. Anyway, I've tried to cut them out a few times and am pretty sure as a result that it's potatoes that make my skin really dry. Just wondered if anyone else has had the same sort of experience? Having not had any for a few days, then had some yesterday and today, my heels, which had started getting better, have cracked up. I will now eliminate them properly for a couple of weeks and test again, but would be intereseted to hear others' experiences with nightshades.

Thanks!
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Susie from Coventry, UK

IBS & GERD 2000
Screened for coeliac disease as sister has it - negative blood test
Nov 2005 positive blood tests
January 2006 dx by biopsy
gluten-free and dairy lite since then
I am also neutropenic, anaemic and have hypothyroidism
Feb 08: free protein S deficiency; candida overgrowth; adrenal exhaustion

'My grace is enough; it's all you need. My strength comes into its own in your weakness.' 2 Corinthians 12

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#2 Ursa Major

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Posted 02 March 2008 - 01:46 PM

Now that is interesting. I realize that I might get dry skin as well when I cheat and eat potatoes! My lips will crack, and I have to keep putting lotion on my arms and legs, and get an itching, burning rash on my shins that can only be controlled by lots of lotion. I've never connected these symptoms with potatoes before, but think there is definitely a connection.

The symptoms I am sure about are stomach cramps and diarrhea within a day of eating potatoes, and migraines from tomatoes as well as heartburn. Peppers cause me to break out with pus-filled pimples all over my face within a day, which take at least a week to clear up (looks gross and stops me from cheating with peppers :rolleyes: ).
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I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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#3 CCM

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 04:08 PM

I am so glad that you all have brought this problem back up. I have been trying to figure this out for several weeks and all the related threads on this forum seemed old. After having gone gluten-free and CF since the start of the year, I find that I also have a problem with nightshades. In small doses tolerable but a sizable portion of tomato sauce or potatoes and I get sick in about an hour. I get what feels like the flu: low grade fever, the chills and joint pain primarily in knees and shoulders but other joints can also be involved. I also become extremely tired and have gas. I will sleep very hard.

I get a similar reaction to dairy (my gluten reactions are similar but I have not noticed them to be quite so strong). My dietician has recommended that I be tested for rheumatoid arthritis because of the type of joint pain and other symptoms, and because nightshades are known to increase inflammation in arthritis patients.

The other thread I was referring to here mentions a book by Michael Fowler called Nightshade Free Pain Free. Couldn't find it at the library so I ordered it off Amazon. Not the most academic scholarship, but an interesting read. I would go into more detail here but I will have to wait until tomorrow. At any rate, the author contends after a lifetime of horribly serious health issues he determined his underlying problem was actually a nightshade intolerance, not celiac disease. Once he eliminated nightshades and his gut healed, he has been able to eat wheat, dairy etc.

I am trying to learn more about the arthritis angle and determine how one tests for that. Hope someone else might contribute to our line of conversation.
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#4 Judyin Philly

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 04:45 PM

Here is a old thread but it's a good one.
hope it helps
judy

http://www.glutenfre...mp;#entry345337
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Judy in Southern CA

#5 CCM

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 09:40 AM

Thanks so much for that link to the old thread and the lead on the Yahoo group. I had not come across that one before. It looks like I have finally found the right place to learn a lot more about the issue...like, what exactly is an oxalate in the first place? :huh: I have some serious catching up to do on the topic. Oh well, it will have to wait until after my son's bday party. Don't you hate in when life gets in the way sometimes? :rolleyes:
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#6 covsooze

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 03:38 AM

Hi CCM :)

Interesting about Michael Fowler's experiences. How long did it take him to notice a real difference? Reason I'm asking, is I find it simple enough avoiding all the nightshades, except potatoes. The only symptom that I can definitely link with them is dry skin. I'm so hopeless at eliminating them, that I wonder if I eliminated them for a decent period of time, if I would notice a big break through with my health generally.

Have you decided what approach to take?

Susie
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Susie from Coventry, UK

IBS & GERD 2000
Screened for coeliac disease as sister has it - negative blood test
Nov 2005 positive blood tests
January 2006 dx by biopsy
gluten-free and dairy lite since then
I am also neutropenic, anaemic and have hypothyroidism
Feb 08: free protein S deficiency; candida overgrowth; adrenal exhaustion

'My grace is enough; it's all you need. My strength comes into its own in your weakness.' 2 Corinthians 12

#7 darlindeb25

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 04:31 AM

Well, I do not have the patience to read 29 pages of an old thread, I am sure I posted there, but not going to look! :huh: Anyways, tomatoes effect me within an hour--stomach cramps, followed by diarrhea, and I have found, it doesn't matter what form the tomatoes are in, ketchup, fresh, stewed, sauce--just can't have them. I know it sounds weird, but there are exceptions sometimes. There will be a food that you can't have one way, but can another. I can't eat potatoes fried, boiled, mashed. I love them, yet they do not cause trouble as quickly as the tomato, but do cause the same effect. BUT, I can eat Lays Potato Chips with no problems--weird huh? I haven't been able to eat mushrooms for years and years, within 20 mins I am sick, probably over 30 yrs now. Green peppers have always given me terrible heartburn and I never eat them anymore.

One of the hardest things for people to accept is; usually the food we love the most is the food we can't have. We crave that which we can't have. I use to think that toast was the easiest thing there was on my tummy, and here it was one of the worst things I was giving it. Go figure huh?
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Deb
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We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#8 CCM

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 04:41 AM

After a miserable night, having experimenting with whether I might be able to tolerate small amounts of nightshades, my answer is no--at least not with respect to potatoes, and most likely not with tomatoes or peppers either. I am only recently into this gluten-free lifestyle a few months, it never occurred to me when I started that I would have to cut out more than gluten and dairy. It is really distressing me at the moment. Another physician appt on Friday to discuss options and arthritis testing I guess.

I am just browsing through Michael Fowler's book and I do not recall any discussion on exactly how long it took him to recover from his symptoms after eliminating them from his diet. There is a bunch of interesting stuff on the history of nightshades...their use in chemical weapons warfare throughout history, the ruling classes forcing of potatoes on the poor, the use of potato dust as a common pesticide. It really is a bit all over the place....
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#9 mljltarb

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 09:46 PM

I am jst finding out hat my diarrhea (on and off) is from potato. I know I cannot eat chilli, peppers or tomato. Chilli and peppers give me instant migraines that last for days but usually not the associated gut problems. How can poatoes do this? are they different to the other nightshades? I sit in combination with other foods that they reek there havoc? I wish I knew as potatoes were my favorite food. I would get cravings for them, chips, baked any way, yum. It was only after my hubby went on a diet that eliminated them (I was cooking for him and eating the same food) that I improved. I ate them the other day and had a very disturbing thing happen. My heart slowed down to about 20 beats/min and I couldn't breathe. Scary stuff! My allergy doctor thinks it may have been an allergic reation, but all I had following this was a dull headache for an hour. No repeat performances. Has anyone else experienced this happen.
















After a miserable night, having experimenting with whether I might be able to tolerate small amounts of nightshades, my answer is no--at least not with respect to potatoes, and most likely not with tomatoes or peppers either. I am only recently into this gluten-free lifestyle a few months, it never occurred to me when I started that I would have to cut out more than gluten and dairy. It is really distressing me at the moment. Another physician appt on Friday to discuss options and arthritis testing I guess.

I am just browsing through Michael Fowler's book and I do not recall any discussion on exactly how long it took him to recover from his symptoms after eliminating them from his diet. There is a bunch of interesting stuff on the history of nightshades...their use in chemical weapons warfare throughout history, the ruling classes forcing of potatoes on the poor, the use of potato dust as a common pesticide. It really is a bit all over the place....


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#10 CCM

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Posted 17 March 2008 - 11:07 AM

Wow, that does sound like scary stuff! So sorry to hear about your reactions. I have tried smaller amounts of potatoes and tomatoes and still get reactions, just not as bad. I read (I think) in that book I mentioned earlier in this thread that apparently vine ripened tomatoes are supposed to have less of the toxin that causes reactions (it is converted to sugar?). I have not done a food challenge on these yet, however.
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#11 Guest_LittleMissAllergy_*

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Posted 17 March 2008 - 02:45 PM

Sadly, I'm gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, fat free, meat free, citrus free and now I'm thinking I have to be nightshade free because I can't tolerate peppers, tomatoes or white potatoes. I eat a giant sweet potato every night to try to keep some weight on though and seem to be kind of okay with it...do you think that's safe? I hear that sweet potatoes aren't nightshades. Hmm maybe if I stay away from nightshades I can add a few things back in? That'd be nice because weight is definitely a huge issue...and nutrition....
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#12 CCM

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:13 AM

Hey, sorry I have not been on the forum in a week or so. I have read in Michael Fowler's book that sweet potatoes and yams are not part of the nightshade family. The nightshade family of plants is fairly big, I guess, but of the plants that we eat, only these are of concern: potato, tomato, most peppers, and eggplant. These "fruits" of the plant go from green to red/purple/black in color.
The following peppers are nightshades: bell, banana, wax, chili, Thai, habanero, etc.
Peppers that are not nightshades: black, white, green peppercorns, Brazilian, Sichuan (or Szechuan), Tasmannia, Indonesian Long pepper.

Nightshades contain small amounts of several neurotoxins, including solanine. The level of this chemical in foods can increase upon the food's exposure to light, and cooking does not reduce the solanine level. Symptoms of solanine poisoning can include: headache, nausea, fatigue, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea.

Michael Fowler's book states that this condition can be misdiagnosed as celiac disease. I rely on this book for the basic facts because I have not found alot of info online regarding nightshade intolerance yet.

I keep thinking maybe the way to stop this cycle of growing food intolerance is to look more deeply into a rotation diet so that one does not too much of any one food that can overwhelm a weakened digestive/immune system. Has anyone seen threads of this topic on this Gluten Free forum?
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#13 Judyin Philly

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:32 AM

Hey, sorry I have not been on the forum in a week or so. I have read in Michael Fowler's book that sweet potatoes and yams are not part of the nightshade family.

I keep thinking maybe the way to stop this cycle of growing food intolerance is to look more deeply into a rotation diet so that one does not too much of any one food that can overwhelm a weakened digestive/immune system. Has anyone seen threads of this topic on this Gluten Free forum?


thanks for posting.
I think that the issue with the sweet potatoes and yams are they are high in oxalate's so some of us avoid them for that reason.

I also think allot of use have found after some years (me just shy of 3 years) have found we can not tolerate rotation some of these foods.
Judy
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Judy in Southern CA

#14 CCM

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:12 AM

Interesting...thanks for the feedback. I would have thought that a rotation diet would make things easier on the digestive system.
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#15 rinne

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 10:34 AM

Hi CCM :)

Interesting about Michael Fowler's experiences. How long did it take him to notice a real difference? Reason I'm asking, is I find it simple enough avoiding all the nightshades, except potatoes. The only symptom that I can definitely link with them is dry skin. I'm so hopeless at eliminating them, that I wonder if I eliminated them for a decent period of time, if I would notice a big break through with my health generally.

Have you decided what approach to take?

Susie


Very interesting.

What about sweet potatoes as a substitute for a little while?


Sadly, I'm gluten free, dairy free, sugar free, fat free, meat free, citrus free and now I'm thinking I have to be nightshade free because I can't tolerate peppers, tomatoes or white potatoes. I eat a giant sweet potato every night to try to keep some weight on though and seem to be kind of okay with it...do you think that's safe? I hear that sweet potatoes aren't nightshades. Hmm maybe if I stay away from nightshades I can add a few things back in? That'd be nice because weight is definitely a huge issue...and nutrition....


Sweet potatoes and yams are definitely not of the nightshade family, plus they have a much higher nutritional content than potatoes.
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