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15 replies to this topic

#1 YankeeDB

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Posted 13 February 2004 - 09:36 AM

What happens if your significant other is a gluten-eater and you kiss that person? Seriously! Could this be another source of gluten exposure? Sigh--is there no end to this???????
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#2 jaimek

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Posted 13 February 2004 - 12:27 PM

That is a good point. I didn't even think of that. My boyfriend did have chapstick on, that I didn't know the ingredients of, and I told him he couldn't kiss me. As far as food is concerned, I would think that they would just have to brush their teeth first? I don't know. I am new at all of this and also want to know where it ends. Seems almost impossible to be completely, 100% gluten-free.
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#3 Connie R-E

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Posted 13 February 2004 - 02:19 PM

:D I love this topic!
Yes, kissing a non-gluten-free significant other is a good way to gluten-poison yourself!!
We had a great line of posts on the old board about it, one from a girl in France.... (Ha ha ha! French kissing!)
Many, many people reported kissing a non-gluten-free significant other to be a problem. So, if your looking for the hidden glutens that are troubling you, look in someone elses mouth!! :P

My hubby went gluten-free for me, and now he feels better, too! Win, win situation!
Connie
gluten-free since 1-'98
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#4 Guest_aramgard_*

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Posted 13 February 2004 - 02:34 PM

Connie, My husband went gluten-free also and feels better for it. gluten-free since June 2001. To bad it took the doc's 50 years to find the Celiac and I was the one who suggested testing. Shirley
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#5 gf4life

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 09:56 PM

If your significant other rinses with mouthwash, or brushes their teeth, then it should be fine. And Chapstick is gluten-free.

Mariann :)
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~West Coast-Central California~

Mariann, gluten intolerant and mother of 3 gluten intolerant children

#6 erica

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 06:27 PM

So funny... after having a sudden DH onset this week and feeling like crap all weekend, my husband has decided to get rid of all gluten in the home. He changed our shampoo, conditioner, moisturizers, soap, etc... and threw out all contaminated food and he isn't even gluten-free. Never even thought that I could get gluten in my system from kissing him!
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#7 tammy

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Posted 01 March 2004 - 04:33 PM

I agree with Mariann. I asked my Doctor the same question. This is a valid question. It is what becomes digested that matters most but I would take the same precautions as stated by Mariann. Most people want to look and smell their best before kissing anyway, so a quick mouthwash and gluten-free chapstick sounds great to me. Alcohol free mouthwash seems like the right way to go to me, they make plenty of them!
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#8 efb416

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 02:38 PM

Does anyone know where I can get published information stating kissing is an issue? My fiance and I are planning our wedding (will be lots of kissing) ;) I'm hoping not too much clinking of glasses and we've decided to have the same food (gluten free) for him and me - while all our relatives and friends can enjoy the buffet (mostly gluten free - but I don't want to chance cross contamination). And although we will be having a separate plated meal for the two of us I am concerned with dessert as I know he will want some of the more traditional sweets, and I'd really like to see if there is something published on this either on the web or in a book because I'm not sure how far to take it? He is the one who brought up the idea initially, but he was really disappointed with the meal we had at his friends wedding a few months back - that was completely gluten free - and bland :( I know I'm bringing up a really old topic, but I don't know where to go for guidance on this issue.

Thanks!
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#9 happygirl

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 05:26 PM

Related to general food allergies:

http://www.medscape....warticle/525008

http://www.kidswithf...espre.php?id=18

Gluten
http://celiacdisease...s/f/Kissing.htm

http://www.clanthomp...d_category_id=2
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#10 ang1e0251

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 06:15 AM

I am concerned with dessert as I know he will want some of the more traditional sweets


There are probably many of his sweets that can be made gluten-free. You could post what you had in mind and ask for recipes. Some items can be made ahead and frozen. You could have a family member bring them along for you. There's no reason why the food need be bland. The caterer should be able to make it tasty for you.
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#11 christian.808

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 06:50 AM

I didn't think about that either. WOw, great question. Here is an article about this.

"Kissing is 'a sensual meditation,'" says Joy Davidson, PHD, psychologist and clinical sexologist. "It stops the buzz in your mind, it quells anxiety, and it heightens the experience of being present in the moment." (strive4impact.com) I agree. I can't think of anything better than smooching and cud
dling with the man I love. It is the thought of kissing that sometimes heightens my anxiety. I have celiac disease, and if I am not careful, kissing can make me sick.

..more of the article

:)



What happens if your significant other is a gluten-eater and you kiss that person? Seriously! Could this be another source of gluten exposure? Sigh--is there no end to this???????


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#12 Lora-Lee

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 06:44 AM

My 10 year old daughter has just been diagnosed. Just starting to learn about Celiac. After reading the attachments sent....How am I going to control how she is kissing boys when she's a Teen?

How about when people come over and touch the counters or door knobs. Is this a problem too? Or is it just when cooking.

Lora
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#13 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 05:23 AM

My 10 year old daughter has just been diagnosed. Just starting to learn about Celiac. After reading the attachments sent....How am I going to control how she is kissing boys when she's a Teen?

How about when people come over and touch the counters or door knobs. Is this a problem too? Or is it just when cooking.

Lora



You can't. What you can do is to educate her about the issues she will be facing as she matures. Educate her honestly as you would about birth control. Give her all the tools she needs to make an informed decision and trust her to make it.
As to doorknobs and such I personally don't worry about it but I do make sure that I rinse or wash my hands before I eat or prepare food.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#14 Jema

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 07:37 AM

Just wanted to correct something above. A 2004 post claimed that Chapstick is gluten free. I don't know if it was in 2004, but it is not certified by the company to be gluten free in 2009. I called a couple of days ago and the representative said that they do not have verification from every one of their ingredient suppliers that each is gluten free. Celiac's should not use Chapstick.
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#15 psawyer

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 07:48 AM

Just wanted to correct something above. A 2004 post claimed that Chapstick is gluten free. I don't know if it was in 2004, but it is not certified by the company to be gluten free in 2009. I called a couple of days ago and the representative said that they do not have verification from every one of their ingredient suppliers that each is gluten free. Celiac's should not use Chapstick.

You will get a disclaimer like that from almost any company you ask. Even the manufacturers who put gluten-free on their packaging often do not have such verification for every single ingredient they use. The disclaimer is for legal liability purposes.

You may choose not to use such products, but by making that choice you will be excluding the vast majority of products available to us which are, in fact, safe to use.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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