Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Dh And The Military?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Naveed

Naveed

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 30 April 2008 - 08:02 PM

Ok, so my wife's friends are in the National Guard, and I mentioned to them that I had thought about military service before, but my DH would probably cause me to be rejected. However according to the recruiter the told me to talk to I can at least try for a waiver and probably get in. I just have DH and not celiac (which is an instant rejection). Anyone here know anything?
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 Tim-n-VA

Tim-n-VA

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 577 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 03:23 AM

Policies and requlations on this are always subject to change. The link below is to the DoD Instruction on medical standards. I didn't see dh specifically listed in my scan but there is a catch-all of any skin condition that "shall interfere with the proper wearing of military clothing or equipment" as being disqualifying.


http://www.dtic.mil/...pdf/613004p.pdf
  • 0

#3 jerseyangel

jerseyangel

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,938 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 03:58 AM

I believe that a diagnosis of DH is also an automatic diagnosis of Celiac--meaning a gluten-free diet for life. I'm afraid that somewhere along the line, that will be picked up.
  • 0
Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#4 ravenwoodglass

ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,678 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 04:30 AM

At this point you have no celiac symptoms other than DH, that would be very likely to change under the stress of military training and service. With DH you have an 'automatic' diagnosis of celiac. The military is not going to be able to feed you gluten free and you really don't want to do 20 mile hikes with a 75 lb rucksack on your back and weekend manuvers with DH sores on your body. The chance of a serious infection alone is really high, it is not like those guys get daily showers, even in training let alone the field. Even if you can get a waiver as the Mom of a undiagnosed celiac who did join the Army I would strongly advise against it. We sent a relatively healthy young man into the Army and a year later got home a medically discharged man who took months to recover.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#5 gfgypsyqueen

gfgypsyqueen

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 498 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 06:23 AM

Regardless of if you can get past the screening, I would be very concerned about the foods for deployment. On base you can always work somethign out, but in the field you have to rely on what food arrives. Technically they can handle a vegitarian, but I have heard of several who for whatever reason do not get their vegetarian MRE and have to go around in the field trying to trade the non-vegetarian parts of their MRE with others. Just logistically, I can't see how they could accomodate your gluten-free foods.

However, if you are looking for a reserve service type of job, try looking outside of the military. Sheriff Department, Fire department, EMS, Power Squardron, Red Cross disaster teams...I think all of them have different types of auxillary jobs that might give you the fullfillment you were looking for in the military without the food problems and DH infection risks.
  • 0

#6 Naveed

Naveed

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 06:50 AM

Thanks for all the replies guys. This question has been driving me nuts all week mainly because no one will leave me alone about it. I had talked to the recruiter and made my decision not to even try to join after I left his office. However my wife and her friends kept on insisting I keep looking into it. Perhaps now I can get them to realize what I already pretty much knew.

Also I didn't really know that DH could also mean an automatic diagnosis of Celiac. That would probably explain some random stomach flu symptoms I had in the past.
  • 0

#7 jerseyangel

jerseyangel

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,938 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 07:27 AM

Also I didn't really know that DH could also mean an automatic diagnosis of Celiac. That would probably explain some random stomach flu symptoms I had in the past.

Yes, I'm sure it would explain the stomach flu symptoms--are you on the gluten-free diet now? If not, you really need to be to heal and prevent any further damage to your intestine. ;)

Perhaps show this thread to your wife and her friends--this can all be pretty hard to understand. Good luck with everything :)
  • 0
Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#8 happygirl

happygirl

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,942 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 07:56 AM

For some good info to get you started about DH/Celiac, see http://www.celiacdis...nts/A02-FAQ.htm

"Less than 10% of patients with DH have GI symptoms, yet if you have DH, you always have celiac disease. "
  • 0

#9 Ursa Major

Ursa Major

    My grandson Eli, 12 months

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,513 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 08:46 AM

Also I didn't really know that DH could also mean an automatic diagnosis of Celiac. That would probably explain some random stomach flu symptoms I had in the past.



Whoever diagnosed you with DH did you a great disservice by not telling you that you have celiac disease. Not everybody with celiac disease has DH, but the only thing that causes DH is celiac disease.

And the only thing that will heal and control DH is a strict, 100% gluten-free diet. The diet is the only viable treatment, everything else is just a bandaid.

I imagine you are likely on the drug Dapsone to control the DH. That drug is very hard on the liver and should never be used long term. It is good when DH is severe, until the DH is completely controlled by the diet, which can take a little while.

So, please do yourself a favour and start the gluten-free diet immediately!
  • 0
I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#10 horsesjapan

horsesjapan

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 09:51 AM

Ok, so my wife's friends are in the National Guard, and I mentioned to them that I had thought about military service before, but my DH would probably cause me to be rejected. However according to the recruiter the told me to talk to I can at least try for a waiver and probably get in. I just have DH and not celiac (which is an instant rejection). Anyone here know anything?


I would be leary of going on the recruiter's word. Their job is to recruit, and many have lied in order to meet their requirements. Not all recruiters are bad, but there are some that will say whatever it takes! I dont' know for sure, "just" being an Air Force dependant wife, but I doubt there are gluten free MREs. Some jobs don't allow for a regular lunch time close to a fridge and microwave for you to bring your own food (my dh works the flightline, there is no such thing as a "lunch hour" and there certainly are no fridges out there. On the flightline they sometimes eat whatever the chow hall sends or whatever the "roach coach" has for sale (and either way, I'd worry about cross contamination on any potentially non-gluten items). Sounds like you have decided not to join, so I guess I'm just chiming in to say good choice, don't do it!

Nancy
  • 0

#11 Naveed

Naveed

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 06:20 PM

Whoever diagnosed you with DH did you a great disservice by not telling you that you have celiac disease. Not everybody with celiac disease has DH, but the only thing that causes DH is celiac disease.

And the only thing that will heal and control DH is a strict, 100% gluten-free diet. The diet is the only viable treatment, everything else is just a bandaid.

I imagine you are likely on the drug Dapsone to control the DH. That drug is very hard on the liver and should never be used long term. It is good when DH is severe, until the DH is completely controlled by the diet, which can take a little while.

So, please do yourself a favour and start the gluten-free diet immediately!


Actually I've been on a gluten free diet for years, I think any flare ups I have come from either handling food for my kids who don't have DH, or accidentally eating something that I didn't realize had gluten in it.

And no I'm not on Dapsone, thankfully. I hate taking any type of medicine.
  • 0

#12 Ursa Major

Ursa Major

    My grandson Eli, 12 months

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,513 posts

Posted 01 May 2008 - 06:24 PM

Actually I've been on a gluten free diet for years, I think any flare ups I have come from either handling food for my kids who don't have DH, or accidentally eating something that I didn't realize had gluten in it.

And no I'm not on Dapsone, thankfully. I hate taking any type of medicine.


Oh good, I am glad you know to be on a gluten-free diet after all.

But there are plenty of people, some of them now on this site, that were just given Dapsone, instead of being told to be on the gluten-free diet. There are so many ignorant doctors out there!

Still, you should have been told that you have celiac disease. At least your doctor knew enough to tell you that you needed to be gluten-free, that is worth a lot.
  • 0
I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#13 dadoffiveboys

dadoffiveboys

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 117 posts

Posted 02 May 2008 - 03:11 AM

BTW.. Myself and two of my sons have DH flare up if we eat EITHER Gluten OR Casein. Only one of my Five boys so far can tolerate Casein actually :( We've taken him on/off milk and he didn't have a problem or change at all. All my other boys either break out or get Chronically constipated.

Funny enough my dad is very sick right now from a life in the military (btw he has DH) and he has the allergy to Gluten. All that time in service DESTROYED his Kidneys. He's slowly recovering but will never be 100% so I highly do NOT recommend you go into the military with such a severe allergy. IF the military decides to go gluten-free on rations and such then maybe... and I think in our future this WILL happen.

You can also be a career Civil servant (that's what I do) versus join the military. I wasn't able to join the military due to medical reasons.
  • 0

#14 Vanquish

Vanquish

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 18 posts

Posted 18 May 2008 - 07:01 AM

To the poster above me-What branch was your dad in? Army or Marines im guessing? I've been wondering if the soldiers who have a known gluten intolerance that are still in are in because they have more access to "normal" foods IE Air Force, Coast Guard, Navy instead of the Army and Marines that really rely heavily on MRE's and what they can carry. I was speaking with a Air NG member the other day and she mentioned that some people have food allergies and are still in on base, but have to have their food sorted before eating. So it sparked this question.
  • 0

#15 dally099

dally099

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 248 posts

Posted 18 May 2008 - 09:28 AM

maybe all the people in your life that are pushing you to do this need to understand the severity of it. having been in the military myself i know that when you are going to the field or overseas you are NOT going to have access to a gluten-free diet. and even if you are willing to put yourself in danger maybe the people around you dont want to be as this will effect your ability to do your job. that being said, i think the idea of police, emt or fire is a great alternative, as you will have total control over your diet. tell these people pushing you to mind there own buisness.
  • 0

Nadine
mom of 4 great kids - 2 diagnosed with autism and 2 typical kids (thank goodness)
all this started after my hysterectomy in March of 2006
G.F. since Feb 2007
Soy free since April 2007
Blood work was negatvie (after 2 weeks of being on the gluten-free diet)

entrolab results:
Antigliadin 9 (normal <10)
HLA-DQB1 Allele 1 - 0302
HLA-DQB2 Allele 2 - 0502
HLA-DQ 3,1 (subtype 8,5)
carrying one celiac gene and one gluten intolerant gene
nurse at entrolab figures i caught this early and dont eat gluten anymore


life is like a box of chocolates;sometimes you get stuck with the yukky coconut fillet one


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: