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Knorr Bouillon
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I thought I remember reading this was on the safe list....I read the package and the only thing that seems suspect is carmel color. Does anyone know for sure?

Thanks!

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Knorr will clearly disclose gluten. If you don't see it listed by the name of the grain, it isn't there. Caramel color is not a concern.

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Knorr will clearly disclose gluten. If you don't see it listed by the name of the grain, it isn't there. Caramel color is not a concern.

does any one know if Tones chicken bouillon is gluten free

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Herb Ox boullion cubes are gluten-free. They say so right on the package. I can't find them at Walmart or Frys (Krogger store) buy Safeway here carries them. I don't know about Knorr. I was happy to find the Herb Ox. I love when products are actually labeled gluten-free. Makes shopping so much easier!!

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Another thing that you have to pay attention to re: Knorr Bouillon and other Bouillons and Bouillon Cubes is that they are loaded with MSG. MSG is very bad for you. Also beware of "modified food starch" as this actually wheat starch which is a thickening agent.

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I've recently bought both Herb-Ox chicken and beef instant bouillon (not cubes) at my local WalMart Supercenter. Both jars say "Gluten Free" and "No MSG Added" on the front of the label. Since it's made by Hormel, they're one of the companies that are good about labeling their products.

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Also beware of "modified food starch" as this actually wheat starch which is a thickening agent.

This is simply not true. While in theory, it could be wheat, in my experience it never is. In the US, it would be required by law to be labeled as "wheat."

Knorr is a Unilever brand, and Unilever (like Kraft, Con Agra, General Mills and others) will always clearly label any gluten-containing ingredient by naming the grain source.

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Another thing that you have to pay attention to re: Knorr Bouillon and other Bouillons and Bouillon Cubes is that they are loaded with MSG. MSG is very bad for you. Also beware of "modified food starch" as this actually wheat starch which is a thickening agent.

The comment about MFS is just flat-out wrong.

richard

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It says caramel coloring on it though, I know it is supposed to be fine if made within the US but on the packaging it says "product of Mexico." I'm worried about using it!

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It says caramel coloring on it though, I know it is supposed to be fine if made within the US but on the packaging it says "product of Mexico." I'm worried about using it!

If its sold in the US, they must label wheat. Carmel coloring is not a concern in the US as far as gluten.

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To repeat, Unilever will clearly disclose all gluten sources on the label. If you don't see the name of a gluten grain, the product is gluten-free.

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A friend of mine just sent me a little care package of what is supposed to be gluten-free foods. There is a box of Knorr vegetable bullion. One ingredient is autolyzed yeast extract. There is also a package of vegetable dip mix (Knorr). The vegetable dip mix says autolyzed yeast extract (barley). The bullion does not use the word barley. So, is this autolyzed yeast extract safe if it is not barley based? Very confusing!

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To repeat, Unilever will clearly disclose all gluten sources on the label. If you don't see the name of a gluten grain, the product is gluten-free.

For the third time, Unilever will clearly disclose any gluten in any of their products. If you do not see a gluten grain named on the label, there is no gluten in the product. The product that mentions barley contains small amounts of gluten. The other product is gluten-free.

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I noticed a few months ago that the Chicken Knorr Bouillon Cubes are fine (the Knorr chicken powder has gluten) and the Beef cubes also have gluten. I had to go to a health food store to find gluten-free Beef Bouillon. Could be I was just confused. I will have to check it out next time I go shopping.

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For the third time, Unilever will clearly disclose any gluten in any of their products. If you do not see a gluten grain named on the label, there is no gluten in the product. The product that mentions barley contains small amounts of gluten. The other product is gluten-free.

It is true, Unilever does mention the origin of the grain in their products, worldwide, which is exceptional.

However what they don't care about is that the gluten in their seasoning products ruins entire dishes for us.

Are the gluten in the seasoning products really necessary taste wise? That is the big question.

Could the same result not be achieved with non-gluten variations?

I hope companies like Unilever become more aware of our problems and will only use gluten when they are strictly necessary for the product.

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It doesn't show any wheat in this product ingredients. It has a lot of " unnatural" things someone might want to avoid.

I guess what in saying is that this doesn't seem to be a very reliable site. They look like they say it has wheat in it, but there is none listed.

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Some Herb Ox brand chicken bullion is soy free and gluten free.

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Any ingredient that knowingly has gluten in it must be on a label. Therefore if the caramel color has gluten it would be on the label. Note that possible cross contamination doesn't have to be on a label though. If you want to know email a company and specifcally ask them if it's gluten free. If they say yes, then eat it without worry. If they start to explain the law to you and throw in there that they won't guarantee it's gluten free is when you may not want to trust the product. It may, of course, still be safe to eat.

I think when I first when gluten-free I had some knorr bouillon cubes I had to throw out. But they were probably 2 years old by now and the labelling laws to clearly indicate wheat in Canada I don't think had come into effect.

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Any ingredient that knowingly has gluten in it must be on a label.

Labeling of wheat in Canada has been required for many years as a "priority allergen." The other gluten sources were added effective August 4, 2012, for foods packaged on or after that date.

In the US, wheat must be disclosed, but disclosure of barley, rye and oats remains voluntary. Some manufacturers have a clear gluten disclosure policy. They include Unilever, Kraft, Con Agra, General Mills and others.

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