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Cd & Exercise
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I was wondering how many people exercise on a regular basis and what kinds of exercise do you do?

Since falling ill in August I noticed that I feel better when I walk (especially after eating). The chest aches etc. that I have generally go away and I feel better. Unfortunately mother nature makes it hard to walk in Cleveland this time of year (it's 7 degree's and snowy here today). I am a bit afraid to do more than walking in that the chest aches I get from being celiac disease scare me. I don't want to hurt myself or anything. I've never been short of breath from exercising but I wonder how much strenous exercise celiac disease people do and how do you feel afterward.

Thanks for your input.

Cleveland Bob :)

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I lift weights 3x a week and ride my bike every day. I've been diagnosed for a little over two years and had terrible problems staying active right before and up to a year after DX. My symptoms were swollen joints, fatigue, chest pains, and asthma-type breathing problems. I was also very anemic, so I'd get tired quickly (I can actually remember downing between 2 and 4 Hershey bars during short mountain bike excursions to keep my energy up in the beginning).

Have you been tested for anemia? That might help. Unless I am accidentally glutened, I exercise without issues now. Good luck!

Nadia

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I play tournament fastpitch softball for a team here in MD. We practice indoors right now obviously because of the snow and cold. We sometimes play 5-6 games a weekend and the more I play the better I feel.

I also, walk and jog (either on a treadmill or outdoors depending on the weather) and do yoga.

I have no problem with any types of exercise

When I do get short of breath I find that it leads to anxiety attacks for me. Fortunately, being off of gluten I rarely get that unless I get gluten in me accidentally.

Do you always feel short of breath or just after you eat?

Do you ever feel nausea after you eat?

Hope this helps some:)

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Right now I play indoor soccer once a week and I also go snowshoeing for about half an hour 1-3 times a week (There is tons of snow here where I live)! B)

I try not to push myself since I still get sick some days and because my energy levels are low.

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I try to exercise every day, but much of it is indoors - weights, yoga, swimming. Sometimes I run on a treadmill, so that's indoors as well. (Walking, soccer, tennis, archery, and frisbee playing all take place outdoors.)

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Yoga - Once week (Intestinal therapy)

Lift Weights - 3-4x a week (Glass of Wine - 6oz curls - 3-4x a week :D )

Cardio - Exercise Bike - 4-5x a week

My symptoms got worse when I first began tp work out and got better after 6mos - 1 year - now I have tons of energy (along with a great gluten-free diet)

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How do you get started doing yoga? I'd like to... but just by myself. Is that possible? Are there books and tapes out there? I'm sure there would have to be... what do you guys do?

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I have a dvd that's for yoga...there are tapes and everything out there for them. There are ones for beginners and then more advanced ones as well. You can do it by yourself. It's very relaxing and just takes away stress for me :D

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You can do yoga by yourself, but it is MUCH safer to work with a qualified instructor who can help you with your form and a practice that is safe and suitable to you and your body. Learning to do the poses and breathing in ways that will not harm your body is important, and something only a teacher can do while you practice. (A video can help, but it's not the same.) This is PARTICULARLY true if you have delicate joints - especially your back, neck, or knees, or any particular medical conditions like high blood pressure.) I do much of my yoga at home, but go to class once a week.

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If you don't have a qualified instructor to take yoga from, order a Beth Shaw video off of yogafit.com.

My instructor says she is the real deal and where she got her training.

I do yoga, I ski, I waterski, run on the treadmill, lift weights.

I've always excercised so my diagnosis won't change anything.

Edited for spelling.

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I do PE for school 4 days a week soccer 3 and games on sat and sun

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Hi,

I bicycle 150-170 miles a week, run/jog a few times a week, and do a moderate upper-body weights workout 2-3x a week. I try to walk or ride my commuter bike on errands and my husband and I take a walk (more of a stroll) most evenings after supper.

I think Celiacs can exercise. But I know I have trouble keeping up my endurance level like I use to. I eat ALL OF THE TIME to keep up my energy levels and I try to time protein and carb intake after workouts to increase muscle recovery/building.

I would say if you were having chest pains you should talk to your doctor. I check in with mine every now and again about my cycling and other exercise activities.

I agree with Tarnelberry, when you start yoga it is so much safer to have an instructor and having an instructor often means that you are getting the most out of your efforts because of proper technique.

Best Wishes All!

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I do aerobics 5-6 days a week (Jazzercise) and Yoga once a week and when I can a little yoga at home. But I need the motivation by an instructor (not to mention getting there to get my hard earned money's worth) by going to a class.

I agree with the above..you need a qualified yoga teacher to start with to be able to get the positions right. Go easy though, none of that "power yoga" to start.

I do notice now being totally gluten-free I get tired more quickly and a ton of yard work on top of the exercise above, does me in and I need a day or two break from all of it.

Chest pains I don't think are normal for celiac disease and I'd see a doctor about that. There may be something else going on.

But yes, yes...by all means exercise when you can........we are never to old, and hopefully never to sick to move..l

you've heard the expression, "move it or loose it"...........it's true!!!

Kandee

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I do yoga once a week with my instructor then i do tapes at home throughout the week till i see him next. It is true that it is alot better to have an instructor to guide you to make sure you are doing it right. :D

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I walk. Outdoors, I just walk leisurely around my small town, indoors, I use a Gazelle. I have arthritis, which is now progressing at a horrible rate, so I am limited in what I can do without severe pain. I have found that just leisurely walking helps control things, including my mood. I do range-of-motion for the rest of my body.

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Thank you all for your input on exercise. I love to walk (sometimes up to 3-4 miles a day) but as In said it's tough this time of year. I can't wait for the weather to break so I can get back to my regular schedule. Like I said the exercise usually makes the chest/muscle aches go away and I've never been short of breath.

I have noticed that I do get tired and I try to watch how much I do or how often. Hopefully as I heal-up I rebuild my system I can start to jog or do more strenous exercise.

Thanks again for all your info.

Cleveland Bob :)

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If walking helps with the aches then keep doing that. But you might want to check with your doctor just to make sure everything is alright.

I never get pain or aches in the chest what i get is more like a shortness of breath. And that's pretty much only when I am "glutened"

Do you get aches only after you eat? Like have you noticed a pattern?

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You should try a treadmill. Of course, I have a membership at a gym that I haven't been to in a month or so. I'm new to gluten-free, so I'm having a hard time getting adjusted, and I'm SO SO SO tired.

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Hi -

Love these threads on Celiac & exercise! I'm a marathon runner, and I pretty much run every day. Lately, most of my runs have been indoors (on the treadmill at the gym) - but it's much more fun to run outdoors.... Even in the snow.

I've found that since I started the gluten-free diet, my energy levels have risen tremendously (most likely 'cause I got the anemia under control). You do have to make sure you're eating enough, though... I seem to have much more energy when I run after having had at least one meal than when I run before breakfast.

Interestingly enough, during a "gluten episode", my stomach tends to feel better when I'm running than when I'm just sitting around (perhaps because blood is directed to the leg muscles instead of the stomach??) - Anyone else find this to be the case? Afterwards, however, it can be just as bad as before running (or sometimes worse).

Don't have chest pains (could breathing in cold air be the culprit in your case?).

Happy trails!

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Hi,

I know this thread is a bit old, but talking exercise and celiac disease is so relavent to me that I just had to bring it up.

I've read research on Celiac Athletes (all two reports that were ever written) and it suggested that elite Celiac Athletes increase their caloric intake and frequency of meals to compensate for celiac disease. I can say that I've found that to be true, I eat often and a ton.

I tried Larabars recently and I'm hooked. The Cherry Pie flavor is my favorite! Finally a delicious gluten-free energy bar! Though because it doesn't have chocolate non of my non-celiac friends will try it :lol:

Does anyone who races or particpates with a group wear Celiac related clothing or work to bring awareness about celiac disease? I wear a Gluten Solutions jersey, but that's it (oh and I talk about it), anyone else have "athlete tested" ways of promoting awareness?

Have a Great Day!

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I've read research on Celiac Athletes (all two reports that were ever written) and it suggested that elite Celiac Athletes increase their caloric intake and frequency of meals to compensate for celiac disease. I can say that I've found that to be true, I eat often and a ton.

I also have to eat a lot, especially before and after exercising. I lose energy very quickly if I don't eat well before I excercise and I am always hungrey after I excercise.

Aside from excercising, I find that I get hungrey very quickly after I eat a meal, and I have to eat again! (My mom is always commenting on how much I eat). Even though I eat a ton of food, I don't gain weight, it's strange.

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I am going to hop on the exercise train again soon here. I have osteopenia and the doc said I need to do weight bearing exercise. I have since heard that lifting weights is the best thing to get bone growth--muscle grows the bone has to grow with it. I think I am going to start my am yoga stretches again too as I am very inflexible and really need to work on this.

Bob, I get chest pains sometimes too. The docs think it is muscular and i have had EKG and bloodwork and echocardiogram done too to be on the cautious side. I agree with others, that it is definately worth mentioning to your doc--(I am a CCU nurse B) ). But I thought I would let you know it could be something muscular like costochondritis. It is scary though, because it does sometimes feel like it could be cardiac or something, but for me I have decided it must not be. I just know how it can feel to have a symptom that others don't seem to have and you mention it and people are like "RUN don't walk to the doc about this!" . The anxiety of that could bring on a heart attack all by itself :lol: ! Anyway you need to be smart, and if you get any other symtpoms with that pain then by all means see your doc soon. Otherwise you still should mention it when you get a chance, but it could very well be muscular--esp. b/c increased activity seems to relieve it.

Take care and happy walking!

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I guess my question is why do you feel less energized when you go gluten-free? I have read several posts that people once diagnosed feel a reduction in stamina and energy and am surprised.

Is there empirical scientific evidence that celiacs have decreased energy?

I mean gluten is a protein versus a complex carbohydrate. It isn't an energy source, although it is in wheat and other staple carbs in the western diet. Is your feeling of depletion confounded by the disappointment (sometimes depression) that is comorbid with the diagnosis? Further still but a sudden decrease in comsumption of carbohydrates fearing gluten intake?

As an epidemiologist and pro fighter, I have a particular interest here, and think there may be covariates that actually can moderate or mask the relationship between gluten-free <--->ENERGY. I would think there should be an increase in energy from not having to endure the GI problems, the increased absorption of vital nutrients, and if you maintain your carbohydrates through rice, etc. an overall spike in energy.

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Hi Pisand13,

I replied to your other post in the other string as well earlier. I think the reason why I have less energy at times it because I find it more challenging to fuel my body with enough nutrient packed food. And when I say that I have less endurance I mean as compared to before my celiac disease really manifested. Hope this helps.

Best Wishes!

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I for one have more energy since being gluten free. I was barely able to do anything before I would get tired so easily and sleep whenever I could. I played sports then too and the weekends that I would play I would pay for the next week when I couldn't do hardly a thing. I can now do those things without feeling run out. I think some people don't get enough protein and carbs don't get the proper energy. That's for people without celiac as well...if you don't eat the proper foods that help give you energy then you won't have the energy.

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