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Wheat Straw Is In Paper Now!
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7 posts in this topic

I subscribe to Canadian Geographic magazine and today I got a new issue. On the announcement page there was the following message:

"[Canadian Geographic] is printed on a revolutionary and enviromentally friendly paper we call the "wheat sheet". It uses wheat straw, an agricultural byproduct, as an alternative to virgin wood from the boreal forest. The "wheat sheet" heralds a new age of paper making and publishing in Canada."

You can read more about it in their Editor's Notebook: http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/.../ednotebook.asp

They say that about 70% of paper is made with virgin wood pulp and now they replaced 20% of wood pulp with pulp made from wheat straw. So the paper in this issue contains 14% of wheat pulp.

May be I am being too carefull, I don't know. I definitely think that this paper is a possible source of cross-contamination. I used to read this magazine with cup of coffee and gluten-free cookie in the morning, I do not think I will do that anymore. Fortunately I do not have DH, so I do not react to contact with wheat, but what about those of us who can not even touch wheat or anything made from wheat?

I am planning to write the letter explaining celiac disease, its complications and how their magazine can be a source of cross-contamination to the editors. I am also afraid that this practice of making paper with wheat straw will become more popular as enviromentally friendly and we will see more of paper like this in other publications.

What do you think, would you consider this paper to be a source of cross-contamination?

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I don't have an answer to your question but I do agree if its cheaper to use then all papers will jump on the idea. Maybe Scott Adams can jump in & give an answer.

Can you imagine small children putting this in their mouth!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks fo sharing the news.... I believe this is an important issue to get to the bottom of. If you belong to Clan Thompson site send it to them also......

bkessings

mamaw

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It is always good to be cautious, but wheat grass/straw does not contain gluten in and of itself. Yes, some kernels will get mixed in. But even if they do, they will be so widely dispersed over tons of raw material to make the paper. It would be well below 20 ppm. Well below. Personally, I am not going to worry about paper. I might if I had a small child who was extremely sensitive. But I am not going to be eating any paper. And with the minute amount that will be in that paper, contact should not be a problem either.

You probably pick up more gluten walking around a mall touching things. People eat those pretzels, ice cream cones, sandwiches, etc. and do not wash their hands. Then they touch everything. I dont worry about that either BTW. I wash my hands A LOT. And I have trained myself to never touch myself above the neck unless my hands have just been washed.

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I would be concerned about wheat in paper if/when food outlets/manufacturers/packers

start using it "around" gluten free foods...for example: those little squares of paper

used to separate chicken cutlets when purchased in supermarket; or the paper under the

beef roast used to absorb the excess beef blood in supermarket. Or if they start using

this wheat paper to wrap foods in. There appears to be a potential for this new product

to ingratiate its way into the gluten free food supply chain. At that point, we would have to

be on our toes again trying to explain to these food sources why they cannot use this

type of paper. We'd have to find out if this gosh darn paper is gluten free or not

and it'll put our gluten-free cause back even more. Not only will we have to worry

about the status of gluten-free food but now we have to worry about the containers/wrappers.

Additionally, where will these papers be made, China? Who is going to control them?

How will we really know if a store uses the old regular gluten-free paper or if they've moved

onto this new wheaty-paper? Will the adolescent clerk really care when we ask

"Is the paper gluten free?" It's another tail to chase; another loose end to correct.

Maybe we should all take over one state in US and all live there together...

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Maybe we should all take over one state in US and all live there together...

I'm in!!

Seriously -- I think this problem only will get bigger as "they" (big business/green business/etc.) try to come up with products using "waste" from other products.

I saw a show on TV a while ago that featured a "green" house -- the new homeowner was proudly showing off her kitchen cabinets, made not from wood of some sort, but from ... "wheat board" -- particle board made from wheat straw.

My first thought was, "I'd have to replace all those cabinets if I ever moved into a house like that, just to feel comfortable in my own gluten-free kitchen." My second thought was, "PLEASE don't let this catch on!"

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I am planning to write the letter explaining celiac disease, its complications and how their magazine can be a source of cross-contamination to the editors. I am also afraid that this practice of making paper with wheat straw will become more popular as enviromentally friendly and we will see more of paper like this in other publications.

The Editor of Canadian Geographic [boychuk is his surname - cant remember his first name], interestingly enough, is gluten sensitive. I would hope that he wouldve done research on it before using it.

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It may or may not have gluten in the paper from wheat straw, but the idea of it scares me. A co-worker told me that she heard that they have found a way to make clothes from wheat, which I find frightening.

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