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What Can I Make For Bread?


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#1 kjbrown92

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 09:43 AM

I'm at a loss. My son just got his Lame Advertisement test results back and it's not gluten that he's reacting to, but gliadin. He's got a moderate intolerance to wheat, rice, corn, baker's yeast (among others), and mild intolerance to rice, oats.

I can use quinoa flour, I think (though I have read on some sites, that it contains gliadin), and I can use buckwheat flour (at least until the second round of Lame Advertisement tests come back). I've used blends with rice flour before, but without yeast, I can probably only make biscuits, muffins, and maybe some Irish soda bread. Oh and severe dairy intolerance, and also eggs. ARGH.

He had pretty bad withdrawal for 3 days, from the wheat. He sounded like an addict, begging for one more bite of bread. It was horrible (he's 8). So I'm trying to figure out a dumpling recipe or biscuit or something bread-like. Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks!
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#2 cruelshoes

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 09:58 AM

Removing rice from the equation makes things a bit more challenging, but it is still doable. There are many other gluten-free flours besides quinoa (which does not contain gliadin BTW) and buckwheat. Can your son tolerate any of these?

Tapioca starch/flour
Coconut flour
Teff Flour
Amaranth Flour
Sorghum (closely related to corn, so that one might be out)
Bean flours
Almond meal
Arrowroot
Millet flour
Potato starch

This may seem like a long list, but mixes of different flours generally perform better than a single type. I'm confident we can come up with a flour blend that will help you create a bread like substance for your son.

I look forward to your reply.
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-Colleen
Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)
13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy
Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

#3 RiceGuy

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 11:03 AM

AFAIK, sorghum has no relation to corn. I have read that sorghum and millet are considered to be related by many but not all scientists who study such things (botanists?).

I gave up rice flour in favor of sorghum and millet, because rice flour is gritty. In fact, rice flour is the only flour I find gritty.

As for reacting to gliadin and not gluten, that sounds like an oddly mangled explanation, as if the doctor doesn't quite know what he/she is talking about. Without the gliadin protein, gluten wouldn't exist. For all practical purposes regarding gluten intolerance, the two are the same, though technically not. Recently I read that gluten forms when two proteins in the wheat combine, as it gets wet.

Anyway, I don't use yeast in my breads, nor dairy or egg, and I think they turn out good. But I like a dense hearty bread, not "white bread". I think you should be able to replace the rice flour in a given recipe with sorghum or millet, and it should turn out fine. Same with replacing the yeast with baking powder.
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#4 purple

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 09:18 PM

You could find a recipe to suit your needs for waffles. There should be replacements for all the ingredients. Like flax, chia seeds, egg substitute, applesauce, coconut milk, soy milk, sorghum flour, potato starch, etc. Then, I haven't tried it yet but, you can use them like bread. I don't know how good they would be cold... flippy I suppose, but toast them first. I am keeping my eyes and ears open for the different ways. Ex: reheat waffles in the toaster and put fruit filling or fruit on top or make a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich. Grilled tuna, salmon, etc. sandwiches. Put ham, cinnamon/vanilla or blueberries in the batter. Put peanut butter/banana on top or fresh strawberries with some strawberry jam. Pizza toppings, spaghetti sauce and meatball open face sandwiches...whatever you can think of that is ok for your son. Freeze a batch ahead of time too. Label the "flavored" waffles. My daughter tried the homemade apple pie filling and said to make more. Have fun with it and also let your son decide what toppings and show him how to make the sandwiches if he is young. It would help him look forward to it instead of being upset. You can also freeze small containers of toppings for really fast sandwiches. Label them so your son can choose which one sounds good. Use the ideas on other bread replacements. I just did a quick search for gluten free dairy free waffles and found this site: glutenagogo.blogspot.com. It tells about flax and chia seeds and has a recipe for waffles. Then I found this site: www.care2.com/greenliving/flaxseed-egg-substitute.html. It tells how to use flax for eggs. Flax is super healthy.
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#5 kjbrown92

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 05:52 AM

I already use flax + water to replace eggs. From what I've researched, gliadin is in wheat, rye, oats, barley, kamut, spelt, amaranth, malt, and quinoa. Since gliadin is part of gluten, I don't understand how it can be part of more grains than gluten, but he was tested for gliadin and gluten, and he didn't react to gluten, but he did to gliadin.

He also can't have apples or strawberries. I have coconut flour, buckwheat flour, quinoa flour (though not sure if I can use it). I think I have some sorghum too. I'm waiting on his other tests to find out if he can have almonds. He also can't have peas. I'm waiting to hear about other legumes, to see if I can use some of the bean flours.

The idea to make sandwiches using waffles is a good one. The meatball sandwich is do-able, and hamburgers. I wish I could get him to eat peanut butter and banana sandwiches, since that's a good protein meal (he's also off turkey, chicken, lamb, pork, and tuna - so his proteins are limited).

I guess I'll just experiment with waffle recipes for now and see what I can come up with. Maybe I can even figure out a dumpling recipe with mix-and-match flours.

Thanks.
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#6 cruelshoes

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 06:47 AM

From what I've researched, gliadin is in wheat, rye, oats, barley, kamut, spelt, amaranth, malt, and quinoa. Since gliadin is part of gluten, I don't understand how it can be part of more grains than gluten, but he was tested for gliadin and gluten, and he didn't react to gluten, but he did to gliadin.


Gluten is a general term for protein storage in cereal grains. Many grains contain gluten (corn, for example), but it is not in the form of gliadin so it does not cause celiacs trouble. Gliadin is the name for the protein present in wheat and several other cereals within the grass genus Triticum (wheat, barley, rye, spelt, einkorn, emmer, durum and others). Gliadin is not present in oats, amaranth or quinoa. Amaranth, oats and quinoa are in totally different classes of plants, and contain different proteins. Malt is made from barley (most of the time). Oats containt the protein avenin, not gliadin, but are often contaminated with gluten grains. The only oats that are guaranteed to be free of gluten and/or gliadin contamination are grown in dedicated fields.

Hope this helps and din't make things more confusing. :)
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-Colleen
Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)
13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy
Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

#7 jnclelland

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 12:01 PM

I'm at a loss. My son just got his Lame Advertisement test results back and it's not gluten that he's reacting to, but gliadin. He's got a moderate intolerance to wheat, rice, corn, baker's yeast (among others), and mild intolerance to rice, oats.



Try this mix:

http://www.glutenevo....html#yeastfree

It's free of all the ingredients you listed, and it's remarkably good. (My non-gluten-free kids even try to steal bites of the toast I make with it.) It does dry out fairly quickly, so I usually slice it and freeze it as soon as it cools.

Jeanne
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