Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Do I *really* Have To Get A New Toaster?


  • Please log in to reply

9 replies to this topic

#1 Hummingbird4

 
Hummingbird4

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 186 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2008 - 05:36 PM

I am largely asymptomatic, but was diagnosed celiac on June 24. Four days later we left for a 2-week Europe vacation - I wasn't about to make any dietary changes prior to our trip, but now I'm getting my kitchen (and myself) ready to start the gluten-free diet on August 1. After reading advice on this site, I've decided to make my entire kitchen gluten-free. I will cook gluten-free foods for my family, and they can get their gluten-y foods elsewhere - out of the house - if they want them.

So. We recently bought a very nice, rather expensive toaster a few months ago. Can I give it a good scrubbing and use it, so long as I don't put any gluten-containing breads into it forevermore? What about my Kitchen-Aid stand mixer?

I'm going to buy new nonstick skillets, nonstick baking pans, wooden spoons, colander, silicon spatulas, tupperware containers, and plastic serving things (like pasta servers). Anything else?

Thanks!
  • 0
Diagnosed Celiac in June 2008 by biopsy and blood tests.
DQ2.2 (HLA DQA1*0201:DQB1*0202) and DQ2.5trans (HLA DQA1*05) positive.

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 psawyer

 
psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,074 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2008 - 05:47 PM

Check your plastic utensils, Tupperware, and and non-stick cookware. If they are in good condition, without any scratches, then a good, thorough washing should be fine. Your mixer should be fine if you scrub the working parts.

Colanders and wooden utensils are porous and, like scratched items, can have deeply embedded gluten that cannot be washed off.

The nature of a toaster is that is has many, many places where a bread crumb can hide, and it will be been exposed to thousands of crumbs. I don't think one can be adequately cleaned. It's not like you can put it through a few cycles of your dishwasher; it is an electrical appliance that can not be immersed.

I would replace the toaster, even if it was an expensive one. What is the price of your health?

I hope this helps.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#3 par18

 
par18

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2008 - 06:24 PM

I was in the same position when I started the diet. We had a pretty expensive toaster and I decided to try to clean mine. I used an air compressor and completely blew out all four slots with the bottom removed. Only gluten-free bread was used after that and in the 3 plus years since I have had no symptoms. I guess it would depend on the individual and how sensitive he or she may be. For the most part we bring very little gluten in the home and if it does happen it is "isolated" until consumed. We also did not replace all the wooden or non-stick items but rather clean and not expose them to gluten again. I was a biopsy confirmed Celiac with the classic symptoms so I know I will react to exposure to gluten. So far so good.

Tom
  • 0

#4 Gemini

 
Gemini

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,161 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2008 - 07:04 PM

I was in the same position when I started the diet. We had a pretty expensive toaster and I decided to try to clean mine. I used an air compressor and completely blew out all four slots with the bottom removed. Only gluten-free bread was used after that and in the 3 plus years since I have had no symptoms. I guess it would depend on the individual and how sensitive he or she may be. For the most part we bring very little gluten in the home and if it does happen it is "isolated" until consumed. We also did not replace all the wooden or non-stick items but rather clean and not expose them to gluten again. I was a biopsy confirmed Celiac with the classic symptoms so I know I will react to exposure to gluten. So far so good.

Tom


This is good, realistic advice. As long as the toaster is not extremely old and can be cleaned thoroughly, it should be enough to prevent gluten exposure. Most people would know after a bit if they were exposed or it would show in their bloodwork, when re-tested. It really all depends on comfort level but common sense should reign. I have had the same experience as Tom and have not any glutenings since being diagnosed.....from my kitchen. Bloodwork is fine so I am not worried.
  • 0

#5 JNBunnie1

 
JNBunnie1

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,326 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2008 - 07:20 PM

I was in the same position when I started the diet. We had a pretty expensive toaster and I decided to try to clean mine. I used an air compressor and completely blew out all four slots with the bottom removed. Only gluten-free bread was used after that and in the 3 plus years since I have had no symptoms. I guess it would depend on the individual and how sensitive he or she may be. For the most part we bring very little gluten in the home and if it does happen it is "isolated" until consumed. We also did not replace all the wooden or non-stick items but rather clean and not expose them to gluten again. I was a biopsy confirmed Celiac with the classic symptoms so I know I will react to exposure to gluten. So far so good.

Tom



That's a great idea. Unfortunately, not everyone has an air compressor.
  • 0
If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

#6 home_based_mom

 
home_based_mom

    Operation Christmas Child

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 768 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2008 - 07:59 PM

That's a great idea. Unfortunately, not everyone has an air compressor.

But you can buy a can of compressed air from any computer or office supply store! ;)

  • 0
Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.
"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .
"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)
The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

#7 darlindeb25

 
darlindeb25

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,324 posts
 

Posted 20 July 2008 - 01:44 AM

There are so many things you can get by with without replacing them. The toaster is not one of them. Blowing it out with an air compressor is a great idea, but not the best idea. Those of you who have done this are very lucky, so far. Toasters are not that expensive, and your health is definitely worth the purchase of a new toaster. Many people think they can clean out a bread maker too, then find out they can't. If you are largely asymptomatic, then how will you be sure you are not being glutened by the toaster???

Have you ever read this statement before: If you take a piece of bread, and break it into 1000 crumbs, it takes only 1 crumb, 1/1000th of a piece of bread to gluten a celiac.

Do you really think the toaster will be safe???
  • 0
Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#8 torontosue

 
torontosue

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
 

Posted 20 July 2008 - 02:54 AM

The only thing I replaced were the wooden spoons, I figured those were more porous and who knew? Besides, a few wooden spoons didn't cost that much. The rest of my kitchen stuff I cleaned really thoroughly.

I didn't get a new toaster, but I use a toaster oven so it was a lot easier to clean that out, just scrub the rack, clean out the bottom as well as I could, and so far, no crumbs have made it from where ever they are lurking to gluten me. If I'd had a conventional toaster I may have felt differently.
  • 0
Sue

positive Biopsy diagnosis May 2008

allergic to strawberries and grapes
Mom to peanut allergy kid.

#9 JenPen

 
JenPen

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 16 posts
 

Posted 20 July 2008 - 04:43 AM

Hello-

I haven't tried them yet, but bought some reusable "toaster bags" for my bread. You basically put the bread into these little plastic sleeves, pop them in the toaster and there it is. I found them in the gluten free section of my grocery store, but have also seen them at health food stores:

http://www.nostik.co...a...oducts&pd=5

Thanks,
Jennifer
  • 0

#10 Hummingbird4

 
Hummingbird4

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 186 posts
 

Posted 20 July 2008 - 04:55 AM

JenPen, the toaster bags might be an answer. I could thoroughly clean out my toaster and then also use the toaster bags. I wonder about the plastic bags leaching chemicals when it's heated, though. Might have to do some research about that.
  • 0
Diagnosed Celiac in June 2008 by biopsy and blood tests.
DQ2.2 (HLA DQA1*0201:DQB1*0202) and DQ2.5trans (HLA DQA1*05) positive.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: