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Still Drinking Regular Beer - No Problems


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103 replies to this topic

#91 Gemini

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 12:12 PM

Well, may want to give this a look.......I called Frey wine last week and they assured me that their wines do not contain gluten, then another poster called them and they said that some of their wines are indeed aged in wheat pasted barrels. We just can't win on this deal sometimes. Mike
http://www.winecrime...es/latimes.html


I have never heard of Frey wines myself and have never seen them around where I live. I also do not drink white wines, which are generally aged in oak barrels (not all, I agree) because I am allergic to oak and get a severe headache every time I drink one of those oakey wines. I know Chardonnay is and I can't go near the stuff.

What is all boils down to for me is that I have never, in 4 years, gotten sick from wine, ever. I drink wine everyday. Most are aged in stainless steel today and those which aren't, can easily be ascertained as to their gluten-free status, if you talk to someone who knows what they are taking about....usually the wine maker themselves. I have been able to do this. This might be an American thing because I have never heard of a European wine using anything like this, either. I am pretty confidant and have no reservations about ingesting wine on a regular basis. Maybe I'm just lucky or it could be the type of wine I consume. I just feel this is not something to obsess about. Probably 99% of wine is gluten-free and if, by bad luck, you ingest one that isn't (how you will ever know for sure is another thing) you will react and not drink it again. I know I am getting it right because I was diagnosed through blood work so I can re-check that and know for certain whether I am ingesting anything I shouldn't. Not so easy for some other people but if something makes you sick, don't eat or drink it. The vast majority of wines are gluten-free, though, so this is not a huge concern. At least not in the same category as alcohol derived from grains.
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#92 DownWithGluten

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 04:39 PM

I had a bad reaction to boxed wine once. Lol, I was at someone else's house and had just gone through all this effort to check if some 'orange' vodka they had was gluten free or not, using their computer and all... and since I couldn't find online that it was, I gave in and thought I'd go with the ever-safe wine. But I had a bad reaction...after an hour of drinking it, all my insides were in pain and even breathing in hurt. I was like "what the heck?" So...who knows. I'm going to avoid box wine now. I haven't a problem with regular wine though.
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#93 Mike M

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 05:15 PM

I have never heard of Frey wines myself and have never seen them around where I live. I also do not drink white wines, which are generally aged in oak barrels (not all, I agree) because I am allergic to oak and get a severe headache every time I drink one of those oakey wines. I know Chardonnay is and I can't go near the stuff.

What is all boils down to for me is that I have never, in 4 years, gotten sick from wine, ever. I drink wine everyday. Most are aged in stainless steel today and those which aren't, can easily be ascertained as to their gluten-free status, if you talk to someone who knows what they are taking about....usually the wine maker themselves. I have been able to do this. This might be an American thing because I have never heard of a European wine using anything like this, either. I am pretty confidant and have no reservations about ingesting wine on a regular basis. Maybe I'm just lucky or it could be the type of wine I consume. I just feel this is not something to obsess about. Probably 99% of wine is gluten-free and if, by bad luck, you ingest one that isn't (how you will ever know for sure is another thing) you will react and not drink it again. I know I am getting it right because I was diagnosed through blood work so I can re-check that and know for certain whether I am ingesting anything I shouldn't. Not so easy for some other people but if something makes you sick, don't eat or drink it. The vast majority of wines are gluten-free, though, so this is not a huge concern. At least not in the same category as alcohol derived from grains.

In my opinion, don't bother with the Frey wine, I got a massive headache within 1/2 hour after having a half glass and 24 hours later.....Well, it is not good. Oh well, so it goes. Mike
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#94 Lisa

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 05:23 PM

In my opinion, don't bother with the Frey wine, I got a massive headache within 1/2 hour after having a half glass and 24 hours later.....Well, it is not good. Oh well, so it goes. Mike



Are you certain that it's not the sulfites that you're reacting to:

"Contains Sulfites"

Current FDA regulations in the United States require that all wines, both domestic and imports, that contain 10+ ppm of sulfur dioxide state "Contains Sulfites" on the label. This label designation was intended to protect people that may be allergic to sulfites (an estimated 1% of the U.S. population), people with asthma are in the most susceptible category. Signs of sulfite sensitivities include: nasal congestion, headaches, skin flush, broncho-constriction, nausea, abdominal pain, and dizziness. Ironically, because of the technology available to today's winemakers, the amount of sulfur dioxide needed to inhibit oxidation, prevent further fermentation and stabilize the wine is at an all time low. The legal maximum sulfite level for U.S. wines is 350 ppm, with most wines averaging about 125 ppm. Naturally occuring levels of sulfur dioxide in a wine, without chemical additives, would weigh in at around 10-20 ppm.
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#95 lizard00

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 05:41 PM

I don't obsess over wine either. Not that I can drink it right now... <_<

I know with certainty that I react to sulfites. There are some wines that I can drink 1/2 glass of, and feel like I am going to crawl out of my skin for the next few hours, which usually includes a pretty nasty headache, stuffiness and sometimes airway restriction. I have been known to pour out bottles of wine for this very reason. I have found a few that contain low to no sulfites and they are just fine. But I'm usually willing to try a new wine and my concern is always the sulfites, not gluten. I have not, as of yet, been glutened by wine.
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#96 Mike M

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Posted 18 March 2009 - 02:24 AM

Are you certain that it's not the sulfites that you're reacting to:

"Contains Sulfites"

Current FDA regulations in the United States require that all wines, both domestic and imports, that contain 10+ ppm of sulfur dioxide state "Contains Sulfites" on the label. This label designation was intended to protect people that may be allergic to sulfites (an estimated 1% of the U.S. population), people with asthma are in the most susceptible category. Signs of sulfite sensitivities include: nasal congestion, headaches, skin flush, broncho-constriction, nausea, abdominal pain, and dizziness. Ironically, because of the technology available to today's winemakers, the amount of sulfur dioxide needed to inhibit oxidation, prevent further fermentation and stabilize the wine is at an all time low. The legal maximum sulfite level for U.S. wines is 350 ppm, with most wines averaging about 125 ppm. Naturally occuring levels of sulfur dioxide in a wine, without chemical additives, would weigh in at around 10-20 ppm.

Well, it is an organic bottle of wine and says on the label no sulfites detected. That probably doesn't mean there is not some naturally occuring amount that is in there. I don't drink much of anything, but have been enjoying a glass now and then of wine and have never had an issue until trying this brand. This sure feels like a glutening and now the DH is flaring. I'll take another look at what else it could have been. HHmmm..... All the best, Mike
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#97 imissgoodbeer:(

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 03:41 PM

This post is in response to the original questions posted on beer. I should probably start a new string but didn't want to add excess strings out there.

Disclaimer: I personally don't drink lite beers, partly because I don't like them, but mostly because I don't trust that lite beer won't harm me even if you other gluten-free people say it doesn't cause symptoms for you. But, in my previous life, as a gluten consumer, I used to brew a fair amount, and miss variety and good beer.

After starting my gluten-free diet, a brewmiester friend told me that light beers are significantly filtered to the point that they could be considered gluten free (this makes sense with the ELISA tests reported a few posts ago), its also generally true that they are watered down and use gluten-free grains like rice and corn. I don't think there is a filter the beer industry uses that is small enough to filter out single protiens but I could imagine how a majority of the gluten could be filtered out by their processes
Also the fermentation process itself does breaks down the protiens significantly. I have read med reports on the long fermentation processes of sourdough bread, made with wheat flour, that is gluten free and tolerated by celiacs (there is a series of medical articles I've been following published by the med journal APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, main author: Marco Gobbetti, most recent title: Highly Efficient Gluten Degradation by Lactobacilli and Fungal Proteases during Food Processing: New Perspectives for Celiac Disease). The Lactobacilli (one of the the things that make sourdough sour) are supposedly, according to Gobetti and others articles, very active in breaking down gluten. I haven't seen anything on Saccharomyces (the main beer yeast) and it's potential, or not-so-much-potential, gluten destroying properties. Although Lambic beer, and other spontaneous fermentation beers, are generally aided in part by lactobacillus...

Either way I recommend if you don't like current gluten-free beers and crave good beer, brew your Own (gluten-free beer)... And share your notes with me...
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#98 mysecretcurse

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 04:27 PM

Wow I don't see how anyone could CHOOSE to drink beer. YuckYUCK YUUUUUCK man..
I don't drink alcohol at all, it's all nasty.. but I definitely react to beer, no doubt about that.
I react to the tiniest trace amounts of almost anything. I can't eat oats.
Beer.. just don't do it! I used to think I could do things "sometimes" too.. little did I know
how bad I was hurting myself.
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#99 WarEr131

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 06:34 PM

For the last year or so I have been drinking Heineken without any issues. I have tried a few other beers, like Summit and Sam Adam's and have had issues. I usually try a new beer when I don't have any plans the next day to prepare for the fallout. From what I've seen on other posts it seems that each person has to find out through trial and error what works for them. Next weekend I'm going to try Amstel Light to see if I have any problems. After that I'm going to try Bud/Bud Light just for availability sake. We'll see what happens. I might be sick the next day but I love beer so it's worth it for me.
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#100 Lisa

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 06:54 PM

For the last year or so I have been drinking Heineken without any issues. I have tried a few other beers, like Summit and Sam Adam's and have had issues. I usually try a new beer when I don't have any plans the next day to prepare for the fallout. From what I've seen on other posts it seems that each person has to find out through trial and error what works for them. Next weekend I'm going to try Amstel Light to see if I have any problems. After that I'm going to try Bud/Bud Light just for availability sake. We'll see what happens. I might be sick the next day but I love beer so it's worth it for me.


You have resurrected a 2 1/2 year old post, which is fine. I'm glad that you enjoy your beer adventures, but have you considered what your "fallout" is doing to your body - YOUR ENTIRE BODY? Nawl, guess not.
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#101 kareng

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 07:55 PM

For the last year or so I have been drinking Heineken without any issues. I have tried a few other beers, like Summit and Sam Adam's and have had issues. I usually try a new beer when I don't have any plans the next day to prepare for the fallout. From what I've seen on other posts it seems that each person has to find out through trial and error what works for them. Next weekend I'm going to try Amstel Light to see if I have any problems. After that I'm going to try Bud/Bud Light just for availability sake. We'll see what happens. I might be sick the next day but I love beer so it's worth it for me.


SInce you didn't want to comment on the current ( from this week) thread about regular beer, I'm guessing you might just want to make people mad. On the chance that you really don't get it or someone else stumbles on this:

If you have Celiac, even a small amount of gluten starts the damage. There are lots of sources for this just google " Celiac disease centers" and pick a reputable medical center's website for info. Most beers are made with malt ( barley) & some with wheat, also.
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#102 love2travel

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 08:31 PM

For the last year or so I have been drinking Heineken without any issues. I have tried a few other beers, like Summit and Sam Adam's and have had issues. I usually try a new beer when I don't have any plans the next day to prepare for the fallout. From what I've seen on other posts it seems that each person has to find out through trial and error what works for them. Next weekend I'm going to try Amstel Light to see if I have any problems. After that I'm going to try Bud/Bud Light just for availability sake. We'll see what happens. I might be sick the next day but I love beer so it's worth it for me.

Wow. For any new people out there who might think this is OK if you have celiac, it is not! Just think of the internal damage that you could be doing. Perhaps irrepairable, long-term autoimmune diseases or worse. If you have celiac you must be strictly gluten free for life! No fooling around.

To the OP - have you been diagnosed with celiac disease?
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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#103 ursenay

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 03:46 PM

My problem is that I don't consider anything with the word "lite" in it to be beer. I'd rather not drink it than to drink that swill..

Sigh...

Talk about your life-changing events.
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#104 ravenwoodglass

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:55 AM

My problem is that I don't consider anything with the word "lite" in it to be beer. I'd rather not drink it than to drink that swill..

Sigh...

Talk about your life-changing events.


Try Greens gluten free beer, New Grist or Redbridge.
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celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)


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