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Captain Morgan's


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24 replies to this topic

#1 lobita

 
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Posted 29 August 2008 - 09:38 AM

Does anyone else have any problem with the Spiced Rum? I'm trying to get recent confirmation with them (something else other than postings from 2006), but I haven't had any luck.

I've recently had some outbreaks of DH and I'm wondering if this is the cause.
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#2 Lisa

 
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Posted 29 August 2008 - 11:26 AM

http://www.celiac.co...ages/Page1.html

Don't know specifically about Capt. Morgan's.
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

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#3 lobita

 
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Posted 02 September 2008 - 05:29 AM

Well, Capt. Morgan got back to me, and I don't really like their response:

"Thank you for taking time to contact Captain Morgan. Your feedback is important to us.

In regards to your inquiry, please be advised that our non-flavored rums are considered gluten free, however our flavored malt beverages are not.

We value loyal consumers such as yourself and we appreciate your enthusiasm.
If there is anything else we could help you with now or in the future, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Once again, thank you for contacting Captain Morgan.

Sincerely,

Robert A.
Captain Morgan Consumer Representative"

Why do they have to say "considered" gluten-free? The more I read about how they make the stuff, the more I don't like it. I know they use a "mash" that may or may not contain gluten, but if they distill it afterwards, it should be okay. But then they still put into oak barrels to age it, and lots of places say those barrels are coated in wheat paste, which could leave enough residue to make us sick. Grr, why do alcohol companies - in particular - have to be so difficult in disclosing their practices?
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#4 gfp

 
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Posted 02 September 2008 - 05:42 AM

Well, Capt. Morgan got back to me, and I don't really like their response:

"Thank you for taking time to contact Captain Morgan. Your feedback is important to us.

In regards to your inquiry, please be advised that our non-flavored rums are considered gluten free, however our flavored malt beverages are not.

We value loyal consumers such as yourself and we appreciate your enthusiasm.
If there is anything else we could help you with now or in the future, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Once again, thank you for contacting Captain Morgan.

Sincerely,

Robert A.
Captain Morgan Consumer Representative"

Why do they have to say "considered" gluten-free? The more I read about how they make the stuff, the more I don't like it. I know they use a "mash" that may or may not contain gluten, but if they distill it afterwards, it should be okay. But then they still put into oak barrels to age it, and lots of places say those barrels are coated in wheat paste, which could leave enough residue to make us sick. Grr, why do alcohol companies - in particular - have to be so difficult in disclosing their practices?

I realise its infuriating BUT you answered your own question.

It should be OK.... but they cannot guarantee it.....

Grr, why do alcohol companies - in particular - have to be so difficult in disclosing their practices?

You asked a direct question. They actually answered you honestly.
If you asked the same question of a food company they can use the fuzzy law to mislead you legally. If you ask "Does it contain ANY gluten" that is not the same question as asking "Is it gluten free" because they can use the vague definitions (or not) or gluten-free ...

Alcohol is a 'restricted drug' ... its under the remit of ATF and controls are much stricter than for food.

As a test try sneaking a small amount of food into the US. You get a warning, possibly a fine but no jail time.
Try doing the same with a restricted drug. Even alcohol or tobacco and you are more likely to get ail time tan smuggling in an orange.

Strange thing.... if you smuggled in some heroine for personal use your hurting yourself. Possibly kill someone driving or mug someone but essentially yourself. Smuggle in an orange and they have us believe the entire Florida crop will be killed.
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#5 lovegrov

 
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Posted 02 September 2008 - 06:06 AM

IMO, Capt. Morgan's is gluten-free.

Some manufacturers avoid saying it IS gluten-free because the U.S. has no gluten-free standard yet.

If the barrels were "coated in wheat paste," I imagine they would say that.

richard
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#6 larry mac

 
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Posted 02 September 2008 - 08:41 PM

I drank some recently without any obvious glutening repercussions.

Full disclosure. I also regularly drink sour mash style Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey's such as Makers Mark, Ezra Brooks, W.L. Wellers, and Jack Daniels. And on occasion various liqueurs such as Italian Lemoncello (am sipping some Limonce at the moment), Italian Tuaca, Mexican Almendrado (Tequila almond liqueur), Coffee liqueurs such as Kahlua, Puccino, & Tia Maria, Irish Cream Liqueurs such as Baileys, and Italian hazelnut Frangelico.

Mostly though, I'm a tequila aficionado. I'm pretty sure there's no gluten in Tequila.

best regards, lm
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gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

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#7 gfp

 
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Posted 03 September 2008 - 01:14 AM

I drank some recently without any obvious glutening repercussions.

Spiced or the 'normal'. I think the issue here is with the spiced specifically?
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#8 lobita

 
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Posted 03 September 2008 - 05:07 AM

I realise its infuriating BUT you answered your own question.

It should be OK.... but they cannot guarantee it.....


You asked a direct question. They actually answered you honestly.
If you asked the same question of a food company they can use the fuzzy law to mislead you legally. If you ask "Does it contain ANY gluten" that is not the same question as asking "Is it gluten free" because they can use the vague definitions (or not) or gluten-free ...

Alcohol is a 'restricted drug' ... its under the remit of ATF and controls are much stricter than for food.

As a test try sneaking a small amount of food into the US. You get a warning, possibly a fine but no jail time.
Try doing the same with a restricted drug. Even alcohol or tobacco and you are more likely to get ail time tan smuggling in an orange.

Strange thing.... if you smuggled in some heroine for personal use your hurting yourself. Possibly kill someone driving or mug someone but essentially yourself. Smuggle in an orange and they have us believe the entire Florida crop will be killed.


They answered it as honestly as they are required to answer it. The ATF jurisdiction on alcohol is the reason why wine companies don't have to list the allergens (like fish or egg that has been used to fine it) that it contains on the label as do food companies now have to.

But you're right that if alcohol beverage companies don't have to disclose what they are doing, then they don't owe us anything...we just have to pay the price of possibly getting sick. That's the source of my frustration.

Here's info on some oak barrel production: http://www.thebarrel.../OakBarrel.html
Pay attention to the second to last paragraph.
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#9 gfp

 
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Posted 03 September 2008 - 06:14 AM

They answered it as honestly as they are required to answer it. The ATF jurisdiction on alcohol is the reason why wine companies don't have to list the allergens (like fish or egg that has been used to fine it) that it contains on the label as do food companies now have to.

But you're right that if alcohol beverage companies don't have to disclose what they are doing, then they don't owe us anything...we just have to pay the price of possibly getting sick. That's the source of my frustration.

Here's info on some oak barrel production: http://www.thebarrel.../OakBarrel.html
Pay attention to the second to last paragraph.

Lobita, no need for the link for me.... I believe you :D

Anyway, the problem is that stuff line finings or flavorings etc. can actually change source. So unless a company is REQUIRED to do it then they will always avoid it.

To be honest my take on liquors is that there are so many we can use as mixers and most taste pretty much the same after coke or mixers are added so why even take a risk?
I used to appreciate a single malt but again.. why take the risk if I can have an aged 12yr rum or reservada tequila instead?

For me the problem with liquors or alcohol in general is that its habit forming... (I don't mean in the addictive sense though this is obviously true).. I mean we tend to order automatically. (My local bar I don't even order on the days I think Oh, 'll just have a coke I usually get given my bottled cider before i even reach the bar.)

Anyway, what I mean is if you usually drink JD and coke then it tends to just come out.... unless you are in a cocktail bar then its not like going to a resto and spending time with a menu... I think we just tend to order 'our usual' whatever that might be.

So herein lies the problem, if these contain a little gluten (like tiny amount) we might not even react or if we do then well, we get over it BUT because of the nature of alcohol (essentially we buy a specific brand which is pretty much the same in each bar) if we do this even 1-2 a week we are constantly getting gluten.
If we eat in a resto then of course we take a risk, possibly a bigger one BUT unless we go to the same resto each week we are at least not serially (or should a say cerially) poisoning ourselves.
Its the same logic with fast food chains ... perhaps McDo fries are OK once in a while but what is the effect (other than the obvious health issues) eating them 1-2 a week?
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#10 Tim-n-VA

 
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Posted 03 September 2008 - 06:58 AM

According to that article, they coat the grove that the lid goes into with wheat paste, not the entire barrel. Also, this is just one barrel source. The risk is there but hard to quantify.
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#11 gfp

 
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Posted 03 September 2008 - 01:05 PM

According to that article, they coat the grove that the lid goes into with wheat paste, not the entire barrel. Also, this is just one barrel source. The risk is there but hard to quantify.

I think you misread it ??? I have to say its not crystal clear but the say the 'crozes' which they say are the "The grooves inside the oak barrel" .. I have to admit I looked at the pictures they had to clarify this as its not so clear...

It is a bit worrying though.... since they way they word it all makes it sound like a "traditional" way ... which might imply some of the higher end liquors would go for traditional and these are usually the 'safest' ones. (No artificial stuff and traditional seem to go hand in hand?)
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#12 larry mac

 
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Posted 03 September 2008 - 06:08 PM

Spiced or the 'normal'. I think the issue here is with the spiced specifically?


I had the regular spiced rum (and Coke). I'm not that familar with Captain Morgan, in fact that was the first time I ever had any, but as far as I know all of their products are spiced. There's the traditional spiced rum, silver spiced rum, tattoo spiced rum, private stock spiced rum, and the parrot bay line which are tropical flavors with spices. I've never heard of an unspiced or unflavored Captain Morgan product.

I'd really just prefer a good traditional rum.

best regards, lm
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gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa


#13 Tim-n-VA

 
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Posted 04 September 2008 - 04:03 AM

I think you misread it ??? I have to say its not crystal clear but the say the 'crozes' which they say are the "The grooves inside the oak barrel" .. I have to admit I looked at the pictures they had to clarify this as its not so clear...


I don't think I misread. They put the wheat paste into the crozes and then fit the head into the crozes.
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#14 gfp

 
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Posted 04 September 2008 - 04:13 AM

I don't think I misread. They put the wheat paste into the crozes and then fit the head into the crozes.

Without the pictures its hard to explain but my understanding was the crozes are the 'upright' pieces of oak.

"After the toasting level is reached, the coopers are ready to finish assembling the oak barrel. The grooves inside the oak barrel (called crozes) receive an application of wheat flour paste (while the barrel is upright). After this the crozes have heads fitted in. Put into place with a large mallet, the final hooping is then complete."

However... (and google was challenged by this) I found

http://anythingwine....

So it appears your correct and the crozes are the top of the staves (its clearer on this picture)... though honestly I find it hard to say definitively from the quote above... I read it 2-3 times and was not convinced either way....
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Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

#15 lovegrov

 
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Posted 04 September 2008 - 04:54 AM

ALL Capt. Morgan rum is spiced.

richard
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