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Rash...but Not Red
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9 posts in this topic

My daughter has been going through an elimination diet. But she constantly gets this rash. It is not red or pink. It just is little white pimple like skin irritation. It is consintrated on her chest but has a little all over. She doesn't have it when she wakes in the morning. But as soon as she eats...even gluten-free items she gets it. She also get horrible ecezma on the insides of her elbows and knees. Scratches until it bleeds. Since I have eliminated dairy the ecezema there has gotten better but she will scratch every once in a while.

She is allergic to peanuts for sure. She does have a dairy allergy per a RASH test. The RASH test shows allergies to all major proteins. But after reading what you all had to say...I am feeling like she may have a gluten sensitivity. She has had a gene test from the lab in San Diego (I can't remember the name) It came back that she did not have the gene for it. But her Iga test came back off the charts as Celiac.

Oh and one more thing...she has had horrible cradle cap since she was 1 year old. I have never gotten it to go away.

Has anyone had these symptoms? Or any suggestions or advice??

mrsfish :(

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:o Mrs. Fish, Icould have written your post!!!!!!

My son used to get this horrible rash, all over but really concentrated on inner thighs and knees and he'd scratch his knees until he bled, then keep right on scratching!

He also had the severe cradle cap that I COULD NOT clear up! It was gross and so bad clumps of hair would fall out! Nothing helped, even changing shampoos didn't completely clear it up, though some shampoos seemed worse than others.

I eliminated wheat completely from his diet, and after reading that seborrheic dermatitis (cradle cap) can be caused by a vitamin B 12 defidiency, I started giving him a daily multivitamin, and voila! no more cradle cap! Hurray!!!!!

Please try the vitamin and see if that helps.

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Oh ...THANK YOU! For responding. I thought my daughter was the only one who had this. What a relief! I started her on a gluten-free diet 4 days ago. I hope this will clear up within a month??? How long did it take? She also has been dairy free for 9 days. Her eczema on the inside of her elbows and knees are almost gone. Although she may have gotten some dairy yesterday because she was scratching this morning. But I will work on that. I am so glad you saw my post. I really needed to know that I was doing the right thing by putting her on this diet. As for the vitamin, I have been giving her Poly-vi-sol drops for a few days. It contains B12 so...I will look forward to no cradle cap. My 1 year old boy is developing it too. So I will check into a vitamin for him. Thank you so much!!!

mrsfish :wub:

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My son has had really bad eczema and cradle cap since about two months old. He is now three and a half. In the past three years I've done a lot of research on eczema and skin disorders. The one thing I kept bumping into is that there is a relationship between skin disorders and the immune system. So, I bought a book called Superimmunity for Kids by Leo Galland, MD. In it it explains that skin problems can be due to a essential fatty acid deficiency. It explains what and how much to supplement a child to help the skin, hair, behavioral problems etc. - a lot of other useful info.

The first thing I did was get rid of anything that wasn't 100% cotton. People with skin disorders should only wear 100% cotton. Second thing I did was began using All free and clear liquid laundry detergent with allergen fighter and Downy sensitive skin or All free and clear liquid fabric softener. Next I began supplementing EFAs. I was able to get his eczema under control but not completely gone. I eliminated eggs and all milk from his diet. Again, helped but it wasn't completely gone. I then learned about celiac and since he had other celiac type symptoms I put him on a gluten-free diet. All kinds of things cleared up. Unfortunately, in order to get an official dr. diagnosis we put him back on a regular diet after he was gluten-free for four months. That was the worse thing I did!!! After three months of a completely "regular" diet, and constantly feeling like I was poisoning my child, his blood results came back negative and the dr. did not advise on a biopsy. AND, during that "regular" diet time his symptoms returned along with new problems - he began breaking out in tiny hives that looked like ant bites. He developed several food allergies/intolerances, an annoying constant sniffle/runny nose, as well as a neurological eye blinking thing.

He has been gluten-free for about five months now and I've done a couple more things that have helped his skin problems: took him to an oriental acupuncturist (they do acupressure on children), eliminated all sweets - including fruits, began giving him digestive enzymes before every meal, and probiotics daily. He has a lot of food allergies we need to clear but it is definitely looking better.

You can do some research on probiotics and digestive enzymes. Basically, probiotics are good bacteria. They promote a healthy intestinal balance therefore aiding in strengthening your immune system. We use acidophilus pearls by Enzymatic Therapy - the best price I've found is at this website - http://www.healthyeden.com/page.htm?PG=Spotlight. Whole Foods sells a liquid probiotic, I can't remember the name, that is supposed to be really powerful & good but it is very expensive.

Digestive enzymes helps your body digestive food. They break down fats, proteins, carbs etc. small particles. To me it just makes sense that Celiacs should take digestive enzymes. I give my son THERA-ZYME DGST-P, which comes in powder form. I get it from an oriental medicine doctor who does acupressure, acupuncture, kinesiology, allergy desensitization etc. I don't know if you can order the enzymes via telephone or website but their # is 972-473-9070, website- www.integratedcenterfororientalmedicine.com

There are many, many different digestive enzymes and probiotics out there. So you should get some help in choosing which ones are right for your child. I hope that has helped. Good luck.

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Wow! That is really interesting. I thought a while back that she might have problems with Polyester...so she is only wearing 100% cotton clothing. As for detergent...my husband does the laundry and he has "his" brands he will only use So that will be a challege. Otherwise I will read and research what you have given me.

no eggs? I have noticed more of a reaction lately...could be the problem.

P.S. My husband has suffered from eczema all his life and his mother worse than him. I will forward your info to her and him.

Thanks for the info!!!! :D

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But she constantly gets this rash. It is not red or pink. It just is little white pimple like skin irritation. It is consintrated on her chest but has a little all over.

Wow, very interesting. My mother and I both have skin problems that sound very similiar to those described! Small, white bumps that can be really itchy, sometimes get bigger and then kind of pink. They are only on our faces, necks and chests and have drastically reduced since going gluten-free. However, we still get them, I'll get really bad flare-ups if I eat something with gluten on accident. However, we think we might be sensitive to corn as well so my mom is trying to take that out too and see if it helps, and so far she is noticing some improvement.

We also have recently started putting aloe on our faces a couple times a day, it really helps! We use the Trader Joe's all natural brand.

Good luck and God Bless

Taylor B)

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Taylor,

Thanks for the aloe suggestion. I have seen a considerable decrease in the rash since she has been gluten-free but, as you have pointed out...not totally clear. I have been putting evening primrose oil on her eczema...and that seems to really help. This all is really interesting stuff. I wonder if we will ever really know what is wrong???? :(

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have you tried cutting down on the amount of laundry detergent?.........i was having trouble with stuffy nose, itchy nose, puffy eyes, and generally some restriction breathing, and after reduceing the laundry detergent by about 30%, those symptoms dissapeared..........also, although it's difficult to do, check out the meds. ...... sometimes they are a gluten source thats well hidden............. ..zarf.................HI.................(hawaii)

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We have reduced the amount of detergent. thanks for the note on that. I have also did some research and I think it might be dairy. She has had a mild reaction to it. Otherwise thanks for all the help!!!

I checked out the book Superimmunity at the library. Wow that was lots of info!!! I have added Flax seed oil to her diet and Calcium/Maganesum vitamins to her diet and WOW!!!! She is not as hyper or stressed out. The skin on her arms are almost healed. She still has the bumps, although diminished alittle, on her chest.

I have to thank every one at this site!!! I have learned so much! I have no idea where I would be without you!

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    • That was my story Rhian and that of many others here no doubt. I spent years on each and every anti-depressant under the sun whilst telling doctors that I thought something was physically wrong. I found out for myself in the end, so don't be afraid to back your own judgment, ultimately you are the world's leading expert on yourself   But, whilst the diet change made a massive difference to my mood, it doesn't preclude me from suffering from depression. I think in some ways all those years have made it a part of me.  I chose to go back on gluten for testing and it wasn't particularly pleasant. At the end of it I had a negative biopsy, although such was my reaction that the GI told me to avoid gluten for life. So I'm NCGS, or coeliac if I'm in a restaurant and want to eat safely.  To me you're like I was, with two choices. Given what your body is telling you, just assume coeliac/NCGS and work even harder on nailing any contamination. See the tips above etc. Maybe try elimination diets with your Dietician's help to see if there's any other diet based intolerance - it does go with Coeliac - I have a problem with dairy for instance, with others its fodmaps. Finally look into gut healing diets - bone broths, probiotics etc. If your super sensitive it could be that you have leaky gut and you could help to repair that with some diet choices which may make you less sensitive.  Or you can go to the GP and try and nail down a bona fide diagnosis. That would mean a gluten challenge and you'd need support for the 8-12 weeks of blood testing and possible endoscopy. This board would be a good place for that if you choose to go down that route. A good GP or GI consultant makes all the difference there and maybe you could quietly check via colleagues or the web to find someone you can build a good relationship with.  I think either of them would be a rational approach and in both cases you'll be taking action to improve your situation, which in itself is a good thing.   
    • Hi, Ok good advice and I am sincere when I say how much I appreciate a lot of the responses, advice and encouragement that have been posted here. I'm not sure what a nutrionist is but a dietician (here in the U.K.) is a heavily regulated medical profession and my dietician is based most of her week in a hospital where doctors and MD's as they are known refer patients to her for help. She works every day with celiacs, dh sufferers and people with crohns, ibs etc and seeing my skin, listened to what I was saying (particularly about how my redness and blisters resolved on a gluten free (though not wheat free) diet for several years, and sent a report to my doctor/MD requesting a battery of tests - tests that can indicate dh, celiac and associated complications. I also have a friend with a wheat allergy and two with celiac (all diagnosed) and they are encouraging me to go ahead with getting these particular tests. So that's great but reading the above quote that suggests that situations like sharing an oven used to cook gluten-containing pizza, should not cause a gluten reaction. I thought, my god what's the point of going through these tests if my recent reactions aren't actually to do with gluten. Although my dietician is concerned about possible dh and has been through years of medical school, I also really trust the advice of an advanced member on this site and if they think oven-sharing shouldn't cause any gluten reaction, what hope do I have with an MD? It has taken me years to pluck up the confidence to ask for any medical help because I feared that sort of response along with a focus on psychological issues and hormones etc early on in the thread (even though, I only started feeling depressed since yesterday). Actually, I'm a mental health nurse so it's good to see people are alert to these issues but I am also pretty familiar with depression and I know that many people with physical health problems are fobbed off by doctors with talk of depression, stress, and hormones. I'm sorry that I took the (above) quote to heart and I know that I allowed that to colour my perception of the whole thread, which has been helpful in many ways. Best wishes to you all, even those I didn't agree with! Rhian 
    • I thought maybe doing a trial period to see if he reacts positively to being gluten free and then adding it back to see if symptoms come back would maybe be helpful to the doctor? But I guess that's true, it might skew things regarding any future tests that might be warranted. 
    • If you haven't had her tested yet please do not go gluten free. Get the celiac testing first as if she does feel better gluten free when she has to go back on gluten for testing she may have much worse symptoms.  There will also be a higher risk of false negatives.
    • I did not mean to imply that you should put him on a gluten free diet.    If you suspect a problem with gluten, please get an opinion from a GI who is celiac savvy.  All celiac testing requires a patient to be consuming gluten.  The slightly equivocal TTG?  That warrants a gene test at the very least.   http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/it-mmfiles/Celiac_Disease_Diagnostic_Testing_Algorithm.pdf  
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