Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


- - - - -

Confused - Wheat Dextrose- Is It Safe ?


  • Please log in to reply

10 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_goldie_*

 
Guest_goldie_*
  • Guests
 

Posted 16 September 2008 - 09:03 AM

Hi

I wonder if anyone can help. I live in the UK and purchased a tub of coleslaw from Waitrose - Creamy Coleslaw. Anyway I had some yesterday and today and haven't felt great. On the allergen list it doesn't mention gluten or wheat etc but on looking at the detailed ingredients it lists wheat dextrose. I then went on their online shopping site and this particular coleslaw doesn't state suitable for coeliacs - the others do. Seemed clear to me that they had mislabelled. So I gave them a call and was told that wheat dextrose was OK on a list they had . Couldn't get to the bottom of why they had not noted suitable for coeliacs under their product info and why when you request list of "coeliac coleslaws" this one is conspiquous by its absence!

Is wheat dextrose OK ?
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 ArtGirl

 
ArtGirl

    Winter Forest - watercolor

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
 

Posted 16 September 2008 - 10:00 AM

Dextrose is a starch and is usually made from a grain. or another vegetable source. In the US it's usually made from corn. It's like a really finely ground cornstarch. I have seen statements that list a different source of dextrose other than corn - wheat could certainly be one of them.

I'd stay away from anything derived from any gluten grain.
  • 0
Valda
Enterolab results: ...two genes for gluten intolerance ...casein intolerance
other sensitivities: corn, eggs, soy, potato, tapioca
Hypoglycemic
Sensitivity to high EMFs [electromagnetic frequency] (limits my time in front of the computer)
Living a healthier, happier life.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.Psalm 139: 9,10

#3 RiceGuy

 
RiceGuy

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,520 posts
 

Posted 16 September 2008 - 12:45 PM

Well, if it says wheat, then that's what it is derived from, and cannot truly be gluten-free. But I do know in the UK the laws are different (and have recently been redefined) for what can be labeled gluten-free. The best advice I can offer is to always check the label. But in this case I think it is clear that it is not gluten-free.
  • 0
A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

#4 Guest_goldie_*

 
Guest_goldie_*
  • Guests
 

Posted 16 September 2008 - 01:33 PM

Yes that's what I thought. Plus their own web site did not include it as suitable for coeliacs. However since posting this topic I have found another page on Waitrose's web site regarding gluten free food. It states that wheat dextrose is gluten free because the hydrogenating process removes the protein from the wheat. Still not sure though -a bit of a coincidence that I have had problems since eating it.
  • 0

#5 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,772 posts
 

Posted 17 September 2008 - 03:36 AM

Yes that's what I thought. Plus their own web site did not include it as suitable for coeliacs. However since posting this topic I have found another page on Waitrose's web site regarding gluten free food. It states that wheat dextrose is gluten free because the hydrogenating process removes the protein from the wheat. Still not sure though -a bit of a coincidence that I have had problems since eating it.


We also run into this issue with gluten grain alcohols and vinegars. It may by definition of the scientists be gluten free but there will be some of us that do react. You have tested this product in the most conclusive way there is. You tried it, you got glutened, it is not safe for you.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#6 Gwen B

 
Gwen B

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 80 posts
 

Posted 19 September 2008 - 08:35 AM

We also run into this issue with gluten grain alcohols and vinegars. It may by definition of the scientists be gluten free but there will be some of us that do react. You have tested this product in the most conclusive way there is. You tried it, you got glutened, it is not safe for you.


I agree. Some products seem ok but just don't work out for you. My mother can tolerate Rice Dream milk, I can't. She reacts to the bread my grandmother gets on prescription. I'm not going to try it. I buy gluten free, wheat free stuff as far as I know! B)
  • 0
gluten free 11/1/07
CF, SF, 02/08
posative Enterolab results 3/11/08
HLA-DQB1, Allele 0303
HLA-DQB1, Allele 0609
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (subtype 9,6)

#7 amber

 
amber

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 224 posts
 

Posted 20 September 2008 - 09:42 PM

I live in Australia where we have some of the strictest labelling laws. Dextrose from wheat is gluten free here as is Carmel from wheat and Glucose Syrup from wheat. The reason that it is gluten free is that because it is so highly processed there is no detectable gluten. I am assuming that it is the same elsewhere in the world.
  • 0

#8 aikiducky

 
aikiducky

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,113 posts
 

Posted 21 September 2008 - 01:56 AM

I live in Australia where we have some of the strictest labelling laws. Dextrose from wheat is gluten free here as is Carmel from wheat and Glucose Syrup from wheat. The reason that it is gluten free is that because it is so highly processed there is no detectable gluten. I am assuming that it is the same elsewhere in the world.


It's the same in Europe. Some people do react to those, though, there's a Dutch discussion board for example that I often read where a few people swap info on products that don't have wheat derived sugars.

Pauliina
  • 0

#9 Guest_goldie_*

 
Guest_goldie_*
  • Guests
 

Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:44 AM

Many thanks for the repkies,

Could be something else that upset me - perhaps it was too creamy. I live in the UK but my sister(also coeliac) like you amber lives in Melbourne, Australia - I seem to recall her saying there was now some issue out there with the safety of wheat dextrose.She could of course have misunderstood. There seems to be so much unclear information out there ( or maybe I'm just slow on the uptake! ). I've also just found out that we have to be careful with mustards -
is that right ?
  • 0

#10 Kevin Stewart

 
Kevin Stewart

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
 

Posted 18 July 2012 - 10:03 PM

My first Post. In Canada when "dextrose" is listed as an ingredient - is it OK to eat? There's something in the back of my mind from when I was first diagnosed about 15 years ago, and have always avoided buying those foods. 'Looked it up a few times but it was never clear to me exactly what was being said.

Ditto for "maltodextrin" (unless it is followed by "(corn)"), "yeast" and anything with the word "soy" in it i.e. "soy lecithin".

Thanks.
  • 0

#11 psawyer

 
psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,058 posts
 

Posted 19 July 2012 - 07:26 AM

The Canadian Celiac Association lists both dextrose and maltodextrin as allowed, without qualification.

Soy is not an issue in and of itself with respect to celiac disease, although some people, including some celiacs, are intolerant to soy and must avoid it.
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: