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Confused - Wheat Dextrose- Is It Safe ?
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Hi

I wonder if anyone can help. I live in the UK and purchased a tub of coleslaw from Waitrose - Creamy Coleslaw. Anyway I had some yesterday and today and haven't felt great. On the allergen list it doesn't mention gluten or wheat etc but on looking at the detailed ingredients it lists wheat dextrose. I then went on their online shopping site and this particular coleslaw doesn't state suitable for coeliacs - the others do. Seemed clear to me that they had mislabelled. So I gave them a call and was told that wheat dextrose was OK on a list they had . Couldn't get to the bottom of why they had not noted suitable for coeliacs under their product info and why when you request list of "coeliac coleslaws" this one is conspiquous by its absence!

Is wheat dextrose OK ?

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Dextrose is a starch and is usually made from a grain. or another vegetable source. In the US it's usually made from corn. It's like a really finely ground cornstarch. I have seen statements that list a different source of dextrose other than corn - wheat could certainly be one of them.

I'd stay away from anything derived from any gluten grain.

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Well, if it says wheat, then that's what it is derived from, and cannot truly be gluten-free. But I do know in the UK the laws are different (and have recently been redefined) for what can be labeled gluten-free. The best advice I can offer is to always check the label. But in this case I think it is clear that it is not gluten-free.

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Yes that's what I thought. Plus their own web site did not include it as suitable for coeliacs. However since posting this topic I have found another page on Waitrose's web site regarding gluten free food. It states that wheat dextrose is gluten free because the hydrogenating process removes the protein from the wheat. Still not sure though -a bit of a coincidence that I have had problems since eating it.

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Yes that's what I thought. Plus their own web site did not include it as suitable for coeliacs. However since posting this topic I have found another page on Waitrose's web site regarding gluten free food. It states that wheat dextrose is gluten free because the hydrogenating process removes the protein from the wheat. Still not sure though -a bit of a coincidence that I have had problems since eating it.

We also run into this issue with gluten grain alcohols and vinegars. It may by definition of the scientists be gluten free but there will be some of us that do react. You have tested this product in the most conclusive way there is. You tried it, you got glutened, it is not safe for you.

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We also run into this issue with gluten grain alcohols and vinegars. It may by definition of the scientists be gluten free but there will be some of us that do react. You have tested this product in the most conclusive way there is. You tried it, you got glutened, it is not safe for you.

I agree. Some products seem ok but just don't work out for you. My mother can tolerate Rice Dream milk, I can't. She reacts to the bread my grandmother gets on prescription. I'm not going to try it. I buy gluten free, wheat free stuff as far as I know! B)

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I live in Australia where we have some of the strictest labelling laws. Dextrose from wheat is gluten free here as is Carmel from wheat and Glucose Syrup from wheat. The reason that it is gluten free is that because it is so highly processed there is no detectable gluten. I am assuming that it is the same elsewhere in the world.

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I live in Australia where we have some of the strictest labelling laws. Dextrose from wheat is gluten free here as is Carmel from wheat and Glucose Syrup from wheat. The reason that it is gluten free is that because it is so highly processed there is no detectable gluten. I am assuming that it is the same elsewhere in the world.

It's the same in Europe. Some people do react to those, though, there's a Dutch discussion board for example that I often read where a few people swap info on products that don't have wheat derived sugars.

Pauliina

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Many thanks for the repkies,

Could be something else that upset me - perhaps it was too creamy. I live in the UK but my sister(also coeliac) like you amber lives in Melbourne, Australia - I seem to recall her saying there was now some issue out there with the safety of wheat dextrose.She could of course have misunderstood. There seems to be so much unclear information out there ( or maybe I'm just slow on the uptake! ). I've also just found out that we have to be careful with mustards -

is that right ?

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My first Post. In Canada when "dextrose" is listed as an ingredient - is it OK to eat? There's something in the back of my mind from when I was first diagnosed about 15 years ago, and have always avoided buying those foods. 'Looked it up a few times but it was never clear to me exactly what was being said.

Ditto for "maltodextrin" (unless it is followed by "(corn)"), "yeast" and anything with the word "soy" in it i.e. "soy lecithin".

Thanks.

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The Canadian Celiac Association lists both dextrose and maltodextrin as allowed, without qualification.

Soy is not an issue in and of itself with respect to celiac disease, although some people, including some celiacs, are intolerant to soy and must avoid it.

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