Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

To All The Type One Diabetics Out There
0

5 posts in this topic

Hello Everyone.....

My younger sister who is 20 and a type one diabetic since the the age of 11, decided to get tested for celiac after I convinced her that it can be hereditary (I got dx 6mths ago).

Even though she has absolutly NO symptoms (lucky girl) she went ahead and got her doc to do the blood work, her Iga or ttg not sure which one she had done, came back 86. Mine was 96, so more than likely she has celiac, next will be the biopsy I am assuming to confirm this dx. My question is she has always had issues with her blood sugars being out of wack, and also has polycystic ovary syndrome.

Could the celiac be affecting her sugar levels????

and be contributing to her constant high blood pressure & kidney problems.

Any advice appreciated

thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Hi,

Celiac disease definitely could have been effecting your sister's blood sugars. I was diagnosed with type I after celiac so I don't have much experience with undiagnosed celiac affecting blood sugars but whenever I am glutened my blood sugar gets pretty erratic. I would bet that once she has been on the gluten-free diet for awhile and her villi heal there will be a good chance her blood sugars will become more manageable and predictable. Also the gluten-free and diabetic diets are pretty complimentary so that should help her too. I'm not sure about the polycystic ovary syndrome or the kidney problems so hopeful someone else can speak to that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been type one diabetic for 35 years, and a diagnosed celiac for three. I have had tight blood sugar control for a number of years now, so I don't think that the celiac disease affected my blood sugars in the past....but NOW, when I am glutened, my blood sugar shoots up. It gives me added incentive to stay gluten-free, for sure!

As Alex has said, the diabetic diet goes very well with the gluten-free way of life...this is likely because there tends to be a limiting of carbohydrate while gluten-free (at least for me), which keeps blood sugars steady.

I'll bet your sister finds a new life of GREAT control once gluten-free..... :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son was diagnosed Type one at age 9 (2003) and celiac the following year. Erratic blood sugars were occuring for about 4 months prior to diagnosis ... his sister was diagnosed celiac first, then they tested Matt immediately - and confirmed by biopsy. His outward symptoms were not as pronounced as his sisters - yet he had way more damage to his villi on biopsy.

Going gluten free will likely help those erratcic readings.

The damaged villi are inflammed so the body is in a constant state fo trying to repair the damage.

Carbohydrates are absorbed in an "uneven fashion".....sometimes they are not absorbed well or the opposite effect "carb dumping" as they are absorbed too quickly...this is what can cause unexpected highs and lows in a diabetic.

Hope this helps.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello Everyone.....

My younger sister who is 20 and a type one diabetic since the the age of 11, decided to get tested for celiac after I convinced her that it can be hereditary (I got dx 6mths ago).

Even though she has absolutly NO symptoms...

My question is she has always had issues with her blood sugars being out of wack, and also has polycystic ovary syndrome.

Could the celiac be affecting her sugar levels????

and be contributing to her constant high blood pressure & kidney problems.

Any advice appreciated

thanks

Well, I'd say she most definitely DOES have symptoms. Just not the ones we might expect as typical. Diabetes, infertility, kidney disease, and many other things are associated with Celiac Disease. Many don't get the classic weight loss and D.

Just take a look at this list of associated diseases and disorders:

http://www.celiac.com/categories/Celiac-Di...-and-Disorders/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0