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Need Help...high Calorie/fat Ideas Gluten/dairy/soy Free
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Any ideas for snack foods and meals that are very high in calories and good fats but free of gluten, soy and dairy? My son is so darn skinny and he isn't growing as fast as he should be. He also has acid reflux disease and can't eat big meals at one sitting, so I have to think of ideas to get him to eat throughout the day. We're also on a tight budget...he likes the gluten-free snack foods you can buy at the store and I try to keep some around, but they're so pricey! I'd love ideas for snacks that will build him up...thanks!

BTW, luckily he's not picky when it comes to the foods he *can* have and he'll eat most healthy foods. Foods high in saturated fats (fried etc.) give him reflux so he doesn't like them. Hence our problem...one very skinny kid!

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Well, I'm not so sure that he just needs calories and fat. While important, neither provide the nutrients for bone and muscle development. Where those calories come from can, and should, be as nutrient dense as possible. Many nut/seed butters are such a food.

As a kid I was so tiny it wasn't funny in th least. I ate tons of food, and practically lived on peanut butter sandwiches. But your son has something I didn't - a mom who knows his intolerances.

Besides homemade breads, crackers are easy enough. You could make little snacks, so he'll always have something to munch on. Bean flours are high in protein and other valuable nutrients, and they work well in crackers. You can also keep nuts and seeds out for him.

Just a few days ago I made blueberry jam - much healthier and cheaper than what's in the supermarket. One package of frozen berries can make nearly half a gallon of jam. I use Stevia, so there's no added sugar either. I'm sure there are kitchen appliances that can make nut butters too.

Let me know if you want the jelly/jam recipe. It also works for apple butter.

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Well, I'm not so sure that he just needs calories and fat. While important, neither provide the nutrients for bone and muscle development. Where those calories come from can, and should, be as nutrient dense as possible. Many nut/seed butters are such a food.

As a kid I was so tiny it wasn't funny in th least. I ate tons of food, and practically lived on peanut butter sandwiches. But your son has something I didn't - a mom who knows his intolerances.

Besides homemade breads, crackers are easy enough. You could make little snacks, so he'll always have something to munch on. Bean flours are high in protein and other valuable nutrients, and they work well in crackers. You can also keep nuts and seeds out for him.

Just a few days ago I made blueberry jam - much healthier and cheaper than what's in the supermarket. One package of frozen berries can make nearly half a gallon of jam. I use Stevia, so there's no added sugar either. I'm sure there are kitchen appliances that can make nut butters too.

Let me know if you want the jelly/jam recipe. It also works for apple butter.

I'd love the recipe! I make most of what we eat, so homemade bread and jam are staples. We have peach trees, and as I type my kids are mashing peaches for yet another round of jam (5 dzn quarts of sliced peaches in apple juice are lining my counters...yipes!). Branching out in the jam department would be great LOL!

We also do a lot of hard boiled eggs, nuts, etc. If we can add some fresh new things to the menu I think it will help him feel hungry enough to eat...at least that's the hope!

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How about nuts and nut butters stuffed in celery or apples?

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My families 2 new gluten-free favorites are:

Breakfast Brownies (taste like apple crisp or gingerbread) I call them grab and go granola bars.

http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

They have alot of ingredients but are worth every minute. Next time I make these I will bag up a sack of dry ingredients. I use 1/2 cup chopped dates and in the 2/3 cup a mixture of chopped sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and macadamia nuts. I wasn't crazy about the chocolate or peanuts in this recipe.

Banana Nut Waffles

http://www.recipezaar.com/312803

Great plain ...right out of the toaster

I made both this week to restock the freezer and I have to make more waffles already. Also 1/2 the bars are gone...so good warm which is when my family unexpectedly walked in the door :rolleyes:

Both recipes have alot of nutrition in them.

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My son was diagnosed with celiac disease in December. He also had reflux. He threw up 10 times a day and has always been skinny. He went on an acid free diet I found on line, I think it was no fat, tomatoes, soda, dairy, chocolate, citris. After a couple of months the reflux went away, and he could go on a normal diet again (except gluten). He also was no longer dairy intolerant. Each time he got accidentally glutened we would have to start over with the acid free diet. Now, he is a little bit fat and can eat anything except gluten. I actually had to cut down his candy intake. Instead of trying to up his fat which is bad for the reflux, try more lean meat. There is hope.

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I'd love the recipe! I make most of what we eat, so homemade bread and jam are staples. We have peach trees, and as I type my kids are mashing peaches for yet another round of jam (5 dzn quarts of sliced peaches in apple juice are lining my counters...yipes!). Branching out in the jam department would be great LOL!

Wow! Fresh peaches! Ever make peach pie?

Anyway, the method I use for jam is pretty simple. I've used both pectin and agar agar with success, but since agar is cheaper, I think I might stick with that. Both seem to work in roughly the same amounts too, though I think I got better gelling with the agar. However, if you don't use Pomona's Universal Pectin, you'll need to add sugar to get it to gel, whereas agar doesn't care.

Blueberry Jam (makes 4 cups)

1/2 lb blueberries (half of a bag of frozen berries)

1 Tbsp agar agar powder

1 tsp pure Stevia powder (or to taste)

1/4-1/2 tsp citric acid (or to taste)

I first stir the agar agar into about 1/2 cup of water. It should get 10-15 mins to soak. Meanwhile, the berries go in the blender with enough water to reach around 3 1/2 cups total. Pulverize. Then I pour that into a saucepan, add citric acid, Stevia, and stir those in as it comes to a simmer/slight boil. Then add the agar mixture, simmer and stir constantly for 5 mins, then remove from heat and let cool slightly. Pour into glass jars, seal, and allow to cool before storing in the freezer or fridge. If it turns out too thick, you can always melt it in a saucepan and add some extra water. If it's too thin, add extra agar.

The amounts are approximate of course, and may vary depending on your preferences too. If you use pectin, follow the directions that come with it. Pomona's has a packet of calcium which is needed to ensure gelling. The one thing I find with the pectin is that it has a tendency to lump up if you're not careful. Seems to work better to sprinkle it slowly into the blender while it's running, and make sure the liquid is hot. You can use 1 tsp lemon juice instead of citric acid powder, or pineapple juice should be fine. The acid helps the flavor. For more acidic fruits like strawberries and citrus, it may require a bit more agar. Fresh pineapple, figs, paw paws, papaya, mango and peaches contain enzymes that will break down the gelling ability of agar, thus need to be cooked first.

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I'd love the recipe! I make most of what we eat, so homemade bread and jam are staples.

I just squish the fruit right into the peanut butter.

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Mix in a serving of protien shake with "not-milk" for one meal a day. This was the only way I kept my weight up when I found my food allergies. I also got more liberal with the olive oil. A sweet potato, cinnamon, and brown sugar snack is a great way to get in some extra nutrients and calories. We all know there is always room for a little dessert.

Are Eggs OK for him? I think I would be sneaking eggs into everything. For DH, I make a Dutch Baby (Puffed Pancake) 4 eggs, 3/4 c. gluten free pancake mix, 2/3c. milk replacer, 2T oil, 2T sugar. Mix by hand and pour in oven safe pan. Cook 18 min or until puffed and golden. While that is cooking, I usually microwave apple chunks, sugar, and cinnamon for a topping. DH loves preserves when I'm feeling lazy. Dutch Babies are fun and with a pancake mix, have a bit of a french toast flavor. (I wish I could have them again. Eggs are on my no, no list).

I always put a little cinnamon and sugar on my microwaved carrots. Then they are dessert like. I agree, foods need to be nutrient rich, but a small bit of sugar, salt, or sweet oil to make them more enticing may be an appropriate trade off.

And for just plain junk food kid joy, I think this popcorn ball recipe could be adapted pretty easily.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Old-Time-Popc...lls/Detail.aspx

Apples and peanutbutter

Oranges

Rasins/peanutbutter/cellery stalks=ants on a log/in a boat

Ricecake/green frosting/broccoli/fruit&veggie bits/gluten-free animal crackers=jungle

I wonder if you could make "frosting" out of protien shake powder?

Peanut Butter Rice Chex Bars: Substitute crushed Rice Chex for Rice Krispies (Rice Chex have gone gluten free) Maybe consider adding dried fruit or almonds

http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1710,131185-250199,00.html

Recipes for kid:Celiac Disease has a category at the bottom

http://kidshealth.org/kid/recipes/index.html

Good luck with the plumping up.

SGWhiskers

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I'd love the recipe! I make most of what we eat, so homemade bread and jam are staples. We have peach trees, and as I type my kids are mashing peaches for yet another round of jam (5 dzn quarts of sliced peaches in apple juice are lining my counters...yipes!). Branching out in the jam department would be great LOL!

We also do a lot of hard boiled eggs, nuts, etc. If we can add some fresh new things to the menu I think it will help him feel hungry enough to eat...at least that's the hope!

Do you grind your own grains? Because one of the things that my kids loved is my home-made tortillas with salsa or almond cheese--I simply grind several grains together--teff, amaranth, organic (non-contaminated) oat groats & buckwheat groats, or any other gluten free grains I can find at the time--it makes a decent nutty flavored flour. Then take your desired amount of flour, add a little salt to condition the dough, and add shortening of your choice to get a very thick dough and hand pat or roll the tortillas. They cook on a hot skillit in about 60 seconds per side (no further grease or shortening needed if the skillit is well cured) and are ready to eat! They are also delicious with hummus, nut butters, salsa, jam, etc. They'd be great with meat spreads (deviled ham for example) if you're not a vegetarian. The raw tortillas will keep in the freezer quite nicely and you can take them out and cook them any time you want them. Enjoy! (If you can't grind your own grains, you may find a flour mixture that works--I just love to make my own flour--the flavor is divine!

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Depending on where you live, avocados might be kind of pricey... but they're healthy and they have a lot of calories. :P

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