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Entro Labs


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#1 Trust Birth

 
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Posted 02 October 2008 - 11:04 AM

I want to use this lab for a diagnosis. DH is concerned that it is on the up and up. Can someone direct me to solid evidence that it is a reputable lab?

Thank you so much in advance!

Cinthia
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#2 leadmeastray88

 
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Posted 02 October 2008 - 11:33 AM

I want to use this lab for a diagnosis. DH is concerned that it is on the up and up. Can someone direct me to solid evidence that it is a reputable lab?

Thank you so much in advance!

Cinthia


Hi there,

There is no such thing. You won't find anything, other than people's testimonies, which are (if you visit the website) pretty positive. As of yet, Dr. Fine hasn't officially published anything related to his findings. We don't really know why. Some people think Enterolab is bogus. Some people don't.

I personally believe it is reputable and here's why: they found I have active dietary gluten sensitivity as well as two genes that predispose to gluten sensitivity. As soon as I cut gluten out, I can honestly say I feel 100% better. The results of this test have kept me from thinking 'its all in my head', as I was always told. That, to me, was worth every penny that I paid them.

All I can tell you is that Enterolab can't give you a Celiac diagnosis, or any diagnosis really. Only a doctor can do that, and they base it on bloodwork and/or biopsy. Most doctors don't support Enterolab because of their old ways and narrow views. Enterolab can test for many active dietary sensitivities in the stool, such as gluten, casein, soy and eggs. They can also run malabsorption scores and gene testing.

Many people here forego the testing and just start the diet and are very happy with their decision. However, there are also some that later on find their problems haven't resolved yet and can't get testing done because they've been off gluten for so long. If you haven't cut gluten out yet, you should definitely get the bloodwork and biopsy done by a gastro. No matter what the tests say, you should go on the diet strictly for at least 3 months and see what happens.

Good luck!
-Kim
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~Kim~ Gluten-Free since July 2008
9 inguinal hernia surgeries in 3 years (2004-2007)
Symptoms Pre-Dx: constant abdominal cramps, acid reflux, nausea, vitamin B12 deficiency, chronic constipation, fatigue, hyperhidrosis, migraines
July 7/08 - tTG 1 (+>4) - Diagnosed with IBS, given Rx, sent home to "relax"
Gastro refused biopsy as I had "already been though enough"
Enterolab Results (Aug 2008) - Fecal Antigliadin IgA 11 (Normal Range <10 Units)
HLA-DQB1 Molecular Analysis, Allele 1 0202
HLA-DQB1 Molecular Analysis, Allele 2 0301
Sept/09 - New GP gave Celiac Dx based on response to diet and family history
National Celiac Disease Conference 2010 Volunteer

#3 ShayFL

 
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Posted 02 October 2008 - 11:41 AM

Enterolab did not find Celiac genes for me and neither did Kimball. It would have been questionable in my mind if the two were not consistent.

Enterolab did find 2 gluten sensitivity genes in me. One DQ3 is related to neurological disorders (which are my primary symptoms). After doing research on the DQ3 gene, comparing what I learned to my symptoms, and knowing I have the DQ3 gene, was enough for me to believe they are doing what they say they are doing. I feel comfortable with having paid them for their service.
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GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

#4 happygirl

 
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Posted 02 October 2008 - 11:46 AM

You'll get various opinions on this. I don't think it has to do with Enterolab, per se, (as they are not the only lab that does this type of testing) but the validity of the method of testing.

There is some research that supports it, but mostly, the 'experts' disagree with stool testing for this.

However, there is a lot that we don't know about Celiac and gluten intolerance/sensitivity.
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#5 Lukalovescats

 
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Posted 02 October 2008 - 05:59 PM

I guess I have the same question. My kid's father says he has found info that the tests are invalid for children and want to have a biospy done. I tested negative for both the biospy and bloodwork but was found to have the celiac genes through enterolabs. My one child's test has shown the celiac genes and the other gluten intolerance. All of us have responded well to the diet. Myself more so, but I have no guarantee of what they are eating at their father's house. I can say when they have admitted to eating gluten it has explained the 3 day tummy ache, D, and headaches. He won't agree, but then again, feeds them the stuff and I'm left to deal with reprocusions. I don't want to have the biopsy done (they've been off gluten at my house since April). Am I wrong?
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#6 Lisa

 
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Posted 02 October 2008 - 06:15 PM

http://www.celiacdis...C05-Testing.htm

Genetic testing for celiac disease

Celiac disease is a multigenic disorder associated with HLA-DQ2 (DQA1*05/DQB1*02) or DQ8 (DQA1*0301/DQB1*0302). HLA DQ2 is expressed in the majority (>90%) of those with celiac disease and DQ8 in about 8%. The expression of these HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 molecules is necessary but not sufficient to develop celiac disease and accounts for only about 50% of the genetic component of the disease. Studies in sibling (sib recurrence risk for celiac disease of 10%) [42] and of identical twins (concordance of 70%) [43] suggest that the contribution of HLA genes in celiac disease is less than 50%. The determination of the presence of HLA DQ2 or DQ8 is now available commercially. The role in the diagnosis of celiac disease is however limited because of the low specificity of the test for celiac disease. These HLA types are present in about 30% of the normal population. Their absence is useful in excluding celiac disease. The role in assessment of the presence of HLA DQ2 or is: 1. In the presence of an equivocal biopsy, 2. When someone is already on the diet, 3. To determine which family members should be screened for celiac disease.
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#7 Trust Birth

 
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Posted 03 October 2008 - 12:14 PM

Ok, this has been helpful. I know for sure I don't want to put DS back on gluten. His dietary response has convinced me that at the VERY least he has a gluten intolerance. He was an extremely sick little boy back in March, since gluten-free diet his health has improved so much. His DH is all but gone, along with eczema, weepy eyes, runny nose, wheezing/asthmatic type symptoms, severe abdominal pains, IBS and behavioral problems have decreased markedly. I assume it will continue to get better as we continue on the diet. To put him back on it makes me shudder, he has done so much healing I DO NOT want to reverse the process if I can help it! I think what we may do is get my DH and I tested in Canada. Either way nothing will change we will all go on a gluten-free diet. My eldest (a girl) doesn't seem to have a problem but I know Celiac can be silent also. I have completely avoided gluten for my 17 month old DD.

Thanks for the responses.

Cinthia
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#8 HAK1031

 
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Posted 03 October 2008 - 01:04 PM

while I too am slightly wary of enterolab as far as their antibody testing, I would say it is worth it for the genetics. I was diagnosed through genetics (I have the DQ2 gene, a celiac gene) which, combined with my symptoms and reaction to the diet, was enough for my GI to diagnose me.

However, I was tested through prometheus (as the doctor ordered), and insurance decided after the fact that they would not cover the $500+ test. So I would say the $99 for enterolab is worth it, and VERY helpful for skeptics looking for more concrete evidence for a "diagnosis."
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Gluten Free since 10/07
Mildly Lactose Intolerant, slight intestinal symptoms after eating milk products, but easily corrected with lactase enzyme
Endometriosis- DX'd 5/07

Gluten Antibodies- "negative"...don't know exact numbers, am highly suspicious...
DXed celiac 12-19-07 via genetics/elimination diet- DQ2 allele

Brother with Celiac, aspergers...his tests were all negative (he didn't have genetics done), including endoscopy, but he definitely is at the least gluten intolerant...highly suspect my mother has it as well- she has hyperthyroid, fibromyalgia, hemochromatosis, and now colon cancer, and she has been weak and exhausted and just generally sick. She's going to get tested.




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