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Millet
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Millet

Millet is highly nutritious, non-glutinous and like buckwheat and quinoa, is not an acid forming food so is soothing and easy to digest. In fact, it is considered to be one of the least allergenic and most digestible grains available and it is a warming grain so will help to heat the body in cold or rainy seasons and climates.

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Thought this would be useful info

Millet

Millet is highly nutritious, non-glutinous and like buckwheat and quinoa, is not an acid forming food so is soothing and easy to digest. In fact, it is considered to be one of the least allergenic and most digestible grains available and it is a warming grain so will help to heat the body in cold or rainy seasons and climates.

I can't eat millet at all. It makes me sick..

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It makes me sick too. I react more quickly and severely to millet than wheat. I wonder why. :unsure:

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Millet is, however, gluten-free. Just to not confuse new people to the disease and diet.

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Millet is, however, gluten-free. Just to not confuse new people to the disease and diet.

No, I agree. I'm not saying it's not (I was kind of wondering if people would start to think that. :P )

But, it is good to be aware that there may be a related sensitivity, it's always wise not to try eating too many new grains at once and confuse a millet (or other grain) reaction with a gluten one.

I'm not saying the two things are related. Millet just makes me sick.

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Boiled millet has a glycemic index of around 70-80 (depending on the lab) which is in the HIGH range. Millet flour cooked is even higher at around 107 (more than PURE GLUCOSE!!!).

When I used to eat it my blood sugar would skyrocket. I couldnt understand why because it was a "whole grain" and so nutritious according to the labels. Then I started reading and researching the glycemic index. There it was.....not good or me at all. :(

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I can't eat millet at all. It makes me sick..

Add me to the list. I cannot eat millet in any form without getting sick. I know it is gluten free, but have tried it baked in breads and in recipes of my own with gluten-free Bob's Red Mill flour and got sick everytime. What's up with that?

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No, I agree. I'm not saying it's not (I was kind of wondering if people would start to think that. :P )

But, it is good to be aware that there may be a related sensitivity, it's always wise not to try eating too many new grains at once and confuse a millet (or other grain) reaction with a gluten one.

I'm not saying the two things are related. Millet just makes me sick.

Millet makes me physically ill. I have tried the millet bread and cereal --each product made me physically ill.

I experienced abdominal cramping and other unpleasantness..lol

If, it makes you sick.. I recommend you avoid it like the plague. I do.

Recently, I read somewhere else on the net of other people with celiac disease having issues with the grain millet.

It turns out others have severe reactions to millet too..

<_<:D

Check out this link on the grain millet

http://www.immunocapinvitrosight.com/dia_t...n____28312.aspx

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Add me to the list. I cannot eat millet in any form without getting sick. I know it is gluten free, but have tried it baked in breads and in recipes of my own with gluten-free Bob's Red Mill flour and got sick everytime. What's up with that?

Don't eat it.. Millet Allergies are more severe than wheat allergies.

I am afraid to try buckwheat now too.. My mind tells me to avoid experimenting with any new grains.

Rice Flour and Chestnut flour are my friends...lol

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Jeepers. Here I was wondering what to do with it. I bought a package to make tabouli with, but daughter refused to eat the stuff. I never got around to making it. She hates tomatoes though so probably wouldn't like it anyway.

Then daughter won a bag of it in the stuff from Manna Mills. She got a tote bag of Bob's Red Mill products, including a $20 gift certificate. I am thinking we will use that to buy rice and spices because we don't really use a lot of mixes and flour.

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Millet makes me physically ill. I have tried the millet bread and cereal --each product made me physically ill.

I experienced abdominal cramping and other unpleasantness..lol

If, it makes you sick.. I recommend you avoid it like the plague. I do.

Recently, I read somewhere else on the net of other people with celiac disease having issues with the grain millet.

It turns out others have severe reactions to millet too..

<_<:D

Check out this link on the grain millet

http://www.immunocapinvitrosight.com/dia_t...n____28312.aspx

Interesting article. Thanks for the link.

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Throw me in with the sick from Millet group!!

When I was first gluten-free in Jan. A real nice lady at Earthfare was helping me navigate through the available eats here and had me buy the Sam's Bakery Millet bread and wraps. Did not work for me, and I had a hard time wrapping my mind around the fact I had other allergies too! Going gluten-free was very fustrating after that experience-very depressing.

If you are lucky enough to digest Millet with no problem, I highly recommend trying Sam's-they are delicious!

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Umm...Sam's is NOT gluten-free. They are made here in Tampa where I live. At my first Celiac support meeting the leader warned us about Sam's bakery. And sure enough the next time I went to the health food store, I read the label and it says that it is manufactured in a facility with wheat and they do not take any precautions and therefore do not claim it to be gluten-free. Many have gotten sick off of Sam's. So in your case, it might not be the millet. But I am sure you arent willing to try millet by itself.

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Throw me in with the sick from Millet group!!

When I was first gluten-free in Jan. A real nice lady at Earthfare was helping me navigate through the available eats here and had me buy the Sam's Bakery Millet bread and wraps. Did not work for me, and I had a hard time wrapping my mind around the fact I had other allergies too! Going gluten-free was very fustrating after that experience-very depressing.

If you are lucky enough to digest Millet with no problem, I highly recommend trying Sam's-they are delicious!

Millet makes me sick. I purchased this loaf of millet bread for $ 5.00 and the stuff made my stomach cramp.

That bread was a wasted investment. I think my gluten free millet bread was produced in a factory with wheat breads. It could have been cross contaminated by other breads.

It is depressing...

Going gluten free is almost like walking through landmines. The land minds are food.

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Boiled millet has a glycemic index of around 70-80 (depending on the lab) which is in the HIGH range. Millet flour cooked is even higher at around 107 (more than PURE GLUCOSE!!!).

When I used to eat it my blood sugar would skyrocket. I couldnt understand why because it was a "whole grain" and so nutritious according to the labels. Then I started reading and researching the glycemic index. There it was.....not good or me at all. :(

Yep. It messed with me too, but I am a type 1 diabetic. It is like eating pure mashed potatoes, for me.

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Maybe that's why Whole Foods doesn't carry Millet Flour...could it be too many returns?

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Don't eat it.. Millet Allergies are more severe than wheat allergies.

I am afraid to try buckwheat now too.. My mind tells me to avoid experimenting with any new grains.

Rice Flour and Chestnut flour are my friends...lol

Buckwheat is not a grain and has a low glycemic index.

Buckwheat refers to plants in two genera of the dicot family Polygonaceae: the Eurasian genus Fagopyrum, and the North American genus Eriogonum. The crop plant, common buckwheat, is Fagopyrum esculentum. Tartary buckwheat (F. tataricum Gaertn.) or "bitter buckwheat" is also used as a crop, but it is much less common. Despite the common name and the grain-like use of the crop, buckwheat is not a cereal or grass. It is called a pseudocereal to emphasize that it is not related to wheat.

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Buckwheat is not a grain and has a low glycemic index.

Buckwheat refers to plants in two genera of the dicot family Polygonaceae: the Eurasian genus Fagopyrum, and the North American genus Eriogonum. The crop plant, common buckwheat, is Fagopyrum esculentum. Tartary buckwheat (F. tataricum Gaertn.) or "bitter buckwheat" is also used as a crop, but it is much less common. Despite the common name and the grain-like use of the crop, buckwheat is not a cereal or grass. It is called a pseudocereal to emphasize that it is not related to wheat.

It also has a much more digestable form of protein. Cream of Buckwheat is one of my favorite things (especially when glutened) and Pocono brand is grown not far from me in dedicated fields and processed in a plant that only processes buckwheat.

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I was talking to a friend at work about what to eat for breakfast. She told me she has millet. I bought some Bob's at the health store near me, and I love it.

Although I was trying to simplify my breakfasts, I've taken to adding ham or bacon, cheese, carrots, potatoes, etc...

It fills me up, one of my primary goals for changing what I eat for breakfast. I was tired of eating sugary pancakes (or rather, the syrup is) and getting full that way. I also have a fruit-filled smoothie to start out. That won't change.

I'm pretty satisfied with the millet solution thus far. Then I ran out of Bob's and bought some Arrowhead mills.

Not nearly as good!

Plumbago

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Just curious what kind of reactions you all have had. I found a millet bread I have been eating since it is gluten free. But for the past 3 weeks I have had severe headaches. I didn't know if there could be a correlation. I've also had some stomach cramping at night. Is there a test to confirm a millet allergy or is it a matter of eliminating it from my diet to know for sure.

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It is mostly just stopping eating it and seeing if your symptoms go away. Since it is not a common grain, it's relatively easy to avoid.

Then if you wish to experiment, if you go a week and your symptoms disappear, you can always purchase some gluten free millet in some form, cook it, eat it, and see what happens. If the headaches return, that was likely it.

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Just curious what kind of reactions you all have had. I found a millet bread I have been eating since it is gluten free. But for the past 3 weeks I have had severe headaches. I didn't know if there could be a correlation. I've also had some stomach cramping at night. Is there a test to confirm a millet allergy or is it a matter of eliminating it from my diet to know for sure.

No adverse reactions at all. Just satisfaction. I even figured out how to cook Arrowhead - it takes much longer than Bob's.

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