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Cap'n Crunch Gluten Free?
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Does anyone know if Cap'n Crunch-Crunch Berries is gluten free? It looks to be from the label, but I'm not sure about the "natural flavoring" ingredient.

Ingredients:

CORN FLOUR, SUGAR, OAT FLOUR, BROWN SUGAR, COCONUT OIL, SALT, SODIUM CITRATE, PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN OIL**, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS, STRAWBERRY JUICE CONCENTRATE, MALIC ACID, MALTODEXTRIN, MODIFIED CORN STARCH, NIACINAMIDE*, REDUCED IRON, ZINC OXIDE, YELLOW 5, RED 40, YELLOW 6, BLUE 1, THIAMIN MONONITRATE*, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE*, BHT (A PRESERVATIVE), RIBOFLAVIN*, FOLIC ACID*.

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It has oat flour - it is not gluten free. Not safe for a Celiac to eat.

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I would be MUCH more concerned about the oat flour than the flavoring. Even if you tolerate pure oats, the oat flour is almost certain to be contaminated with wheat. So, my vote is that it is NOT gluten-free.

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I would be MUCH more concerned about the oat flour than the flavoring. Even if you tolerate pure oats, the oat flour is almost certain to be contaminated with wheat. So, my vote is that it is NOT gluten-free.

Thanks for the quick help. We're brand new to this, and didn't know that oat flour was a no-no! Thanks--I'm learning every day.

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Wheat, rye, barley, barley malt, and oats (unless a specialty gluten free oat) are off limits.

Here is some help with label reading:

http://www.celiac.com/categories/Safe-Glut...3B-Ingredients/

Here are lists of companies that will clearly disclose any gluten source. If you don't see wheat/rye/barley/malt/oats on their labels, then its not hidden.

http://www.glutenfreeinsd.com/product_updates.html (lots of great links)

http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/index.htm

Wheat is required to be listed as an allergen by FDA law. Wheat cannot be hidden.

Let us know if you need more help!

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If you are looking for mainstream cereals ('cause those specialty ones are so expensive :o ) try

Fruity Pebbles

Coco Pebbles

Rice Chex

Tiger&Pooh (kind of like a sweet Kix)

Dora the Explorer Stars (cinnamon-y)

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Are Fruity and Coco Pebbles still gluten free? I thought I read somewhere that they weren't any more. I can't remember where I read it though.

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Pretty sure rice chex has malt flavoring... as do most mainstream cereals. :angry:

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No, Rice Chex is now gluten-free! It used to have barley malt, but they now use molasses instead.

It even says "now gluten-free!" on the box.

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No, Rice Chex is now gluten-free! It used to have barley malt, but they now use molasses instead.

It even says "now gluten-free!" on the box.

YAY!! My DH will be SO happy! When we were early into the gluten elimination diet he ate the heck out of rice/corn chex until we figured out the malt thing. I guess corn chex still has the malt flavoring though?

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Here is a good list to refer to if you aren't sure which General Mills products are gluten free:

http://www.liveglutenfreely.com/products/default.aspx

You can click on the brands on the side to see which products are gluten free, and you can also print a pocket list to take to the store with you. :)

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Does anyone know if Cap'n Crunch-Crunch Berries is gluten free? It looks to be from the label, but I'm not sure about the "natural flavoring" ingredient.

Ingredients:

CORN FLOUR, SUGAR, OAT FLOUR, BROWN SUGAR, COCONUT OIL, SALT, SODIUM CITRATE, PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN OIL**, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS, STRAWBERRY JUICE CONCENTRATE, MALIC ACID, MALTODEXTRIN, MODIFIED CORN STARCH, NIACINAMIDE*, REDUCED IRON, ZINC OXIDE, YELLOW 5, RED 40, YELLOW 6, BLUE 1, THIAMIN MONONITRATE*, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE*, BHT (A PRESERVATIVE), RIBOFLAVIN*, FOLIC ACID*.

The ingredient "oat flour" always suggests the presence of gluten, according to Children's Hospital Boston. We just took a celiac nutrition class there this week and that was the advice we were given. They also said to be wary of seemingly gluten free cereals that are not labeled gluten free; as there is evidence of cross contamination in the factory. This is true for Cocoa Pebbles and Fruity Pebbles... they do not contain gluten in their list of ingredients, however Post Cereals makes gluten-containing cereals in their factory and tests showed that Children eating Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles frequently were ingesting significant amounts of gluten. The only other mainstream cereal I've found (not including those labeled gluten free, like Envirokids} is Chex, which comes in Cinnamon, Chocolate and Strawberry. They are labeled gluten free and do not risk cross contamination. My daughter likes them.

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If you are looking for mainstream cereals ('cause those specialty ones are so expensive :o ) try

Fruity Pebbles

Coco Pebbles

Rice Chex

Tiger&Pooh (kind of like a sweet Kix)

Dora the Explorer Stars (cinnamon-y)

Hi Janet

My husband and I took a course on Celiac disease for our 6 yr old daughter this past week at Children's Hospital in Boston. They advised us to stay away from Fruity and cocoa Pebbles as the hospital did a study on two celiac siblings who were eating these cereals. One of them had a high gluten count in her blood work and they traced it to her eating the cereal every day. The other rarely ate the cereals and was fine. It turned out, they said, that while the ingredients do not contain gluten, Fruity and cocoa pebbles are manufactured in a Post cereal factory that produces gluten containing cereals and therefore there was significant cross contamination. Hope this helps. Emily

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I contacted Quaker and asked if any of the Cap'n Crunch cereals are gluten free. Here is the response I received:

"We understand how difficult it can be to live a gluten free lifestyle. Please understand, however, that we cannot guarantee Cap'n Crunch to be gluten free.

Even when gluten is not present in any of the ingredients, the grains in this product could be grown, harvested, or stored with other gluten-containing grains and thus may contain trace amounts of gluten from those other grains. It may seem minor, but many individuals sensitive to gluten cannot tolerate even small amounts.

Presently, we only label one product line, Quaker Large Rice Cakes, as gluten free. You can find this claim above the Nutrition Facts Panel on the bags.

We're sorry to disappoint you, Heather. We hope this information is helpful.

Dan

Quaker Consumer Relations

A Division of PepsiCo

Ref# 027377882A

At Quaker, we're committed to reducing our environmental impact through creative solutions for minimizing waste - like using oat hulls as a renewable fuel source."

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