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Which Formula Is gluten-free?


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#1 mandigirl1

 
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Posted 09 December 2008 - 05:42 PM

Thank you to everyone who has answered my questions in the past 9 months, regarding pregnancy and celiac disease.
My latest concern is what to fee the baby once he's here.....
which formula is gluten-free? How will I know if my baby has celiac disease and reacting to formula or doesnt have celiac disease and just doesnt take to the formula for other reasons?
Im not going to breastfeed, although Ive heard its the best thing for the baby.
If the baby ws used to feeding off my gluten-free diet for 9 months, why should I introduce non gluten-free foods at all? Wont that get him sick because he never had it when he was in the womb? Does anyone have any ideas? Much appreciated.....Thanks
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#2 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 08:09 AM

Can I please suggest you look into breastfeeding l little more? It isn't only better for baby, it is better for you. It is way cheaper, formula is expensive. It decreases the chances of you getting certain cancers, it is easier in case of a power outage or traveling, no formula to mix, keep refrigerated, or heat. It makes you increase production of a hormone that is calming. It helps with bonding. It is a wonderful soothing device for a fussy baby, puts them right to sleep. It helps you loose that baby fat. No dieting necessary. Look at LLLI.org for more info. They were very helpful to me when I had my babies. I know not everyone can do it, so if you have any of those reasons, I'm sorry for bugging you.
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#3 Mother of Jibril

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 08:23 AM

There are some reasons why people can't breastfeed... cancer treatment, previous surgery, radioactive iodine therapy for Graves' disease... but like the last person said there are SO many benefits for both you and your baby. One of the most important is that formula-fed infants are at greater risk for develping celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. My son has a severe intolerance to casein... I can't imagine how sick he would have been if we were giving him formula.

La Leche League is really a GREAT resource. They'll give you free, individual counseling. I know it's not easy at first, but once you get the hang of it breastfeeding is very convenient.
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Gluten free 08/08
Son has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn
Hashimoto's, MCAD, pregnancy loss at 17 weeks
HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac), HLA-DQB1*0301 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,3 (subtype 8,7)
Extensive family history of autoimmune disorders and related symptoms

#4 MaryJones2

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 10:00 AM

I suggest you pick a few that interest you and call the companies. I know there are several that are gluten-free but don't know brands.
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#5 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 12:09 PM

I just wanted to second (or third!) the suggestion to breast-feed.

Before my first baby was born, I figured I 'd breast-feed until I went back to work, and then give formula.

But my first baby had all kinds of terrible complications: failure to thrive in the womb due to my pre-eclampsia and hyperemesis, jaundice and an enlarged liver at 7 weeks caused by not one but TWO holes in his heart--I could go on, but that's enough!

With all those difficulties facing him (and indeed, his life was on the line), I did EVERYTHING I could to give him the best possible nutrition, and that meant doing a lot of research--which meant, of course that I didn't give him formula once my colostrum came in (which took 5 days and nights of pumping, as I'd been on magnesium sulfate for the pre-ecclampsia, which hinders milk production). I pumped when I was at work, which was difficult,l but looking back, I'm awfully glad I did.

There is absolutely no comparison between formula and breastmilk.

Don't get me wrong--we are very lucky to have the option of formula, because certainly there are cases where it's just not possible to breastfeed.

But if you are on this forum, you likely have celiac, right? And that means that your baby is at risk for the kinds of problems that formula-fed babies are also at higher risk for, like diabetes and food allergies.

The proteins in formula, either dairy or soy, are some of the top known food allergens. Formulas are sweetened with corn syrup--sometimes high fructose corn syrup--which is associated with diabetes. Plus there are no antibodies in formula--but in breastmilk, there are antibodies to whatever virus or bacteria the mom comes in contact with.

You should also know that most of the posts on this forum that have to do with infants under 6 months who have intestinal symptoms--nearly all of those babies were formula-fed.

It's hard to have such a personal decision (after all, it has to do with YOUR body and YOUR baby) discussed by total strangers, isn't it? But I know I've been down the same road, and I would hope that my experiences and what I've learned could be of some benefit to you.

Best of luck, whatever you decide.
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#6 lovegrov

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 12:44 PM

While I wouldn't necessarily discourage you from finding gluten-free formula, most if not all celiac experts think wheat should be introduced to the diet at the normal time. There's even been research that suggests that doing this lowers the chance of developing celiac.

The odds are still high that your child will never develop celiac. I see no reason to force him or her to be gluten-free if not necessary.

richard
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#7 mandigirl1

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 05:29 PM

Thank you for your helpful suggestions.....
I should mention that I had breast augmentation and may not be able to breastfeed because of this. I guess I'll know more once I give birth and try to breastfeed.
Someone mentioned not to introduce gluten to my child until "the normal time"...Im not sure I know what normal time means????
So from what Im reading here/trying to understand is that it is especially important to breastfeed since the mother has Celiac? I may pass the celiac disease along to my baby, so therefore, its better to not give formula? I hope Im understanding this correctly.
Most formulas have the common allergens like soy and dairy?
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#8 lizard00

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 05:44 PM

I breast fed too, so I can't help you on the formula and allergen situation... BUT...

If you do end up doing formula, don't let people tell you to put cereal into the formula to make them sleep, fill them up, etc. That is introducing cereals too soon, and it's too thick and babies can choke on it. My ped told us around 5 or 6 months to start introducing cereals, not so much for nutrition, but to get a spoon in his mouth. We held off with the barley/wheat cereals for a few months as they are thicker and his digestive system seemed a little immature to us. We didn't want to bombard it with something that may have been too hard to digest (And this was WAAAAAY before I knew that I had celiac).

Breastfeeding is easier on the babies gut, gives all of your antibodies and really gets their immune system off to solid start. (among other things) So whenever possible, I would recommend it. But, if you can't; you can't.
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Be yourself, everyone else is taken.
Oscar Wilde

Gluten free November 2007
IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive
Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008
Soy free Jan 09

#9 Mother of Jibril

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 06:13 PM

Thank you for your helpful suggestions.....
I should mention that I had breast augmentation and may not be able to breastfeed because of this. I guess I'll know more once I give birth and try to breastfeed.
Someone mentioned not to introduce gluten to my child until "the normal time"...Im not sure I know what normal time means????
So from what Im reading here/trying to understand is that it is especially important to breastfeed since the mother has Celiac? I may pass the celiac disease along to my baby, so therefore, its better to not give formula? I hope Im understanding this correctly.
Most formulas have the common allergens like soy and dairy?


I know this is a bit confusing...

Your baby could inherit the genes for celiac disease, but you can't directly pass it on (it's not like a virus). The thing is... not everybody who has the genes develops the disease. The genes have to be turned on by some trigger... severe stress, trauma, infection, allergies, puberty, pregnancy, etc... A bottle-fed baby is more likely to develop food allergies and infections, which might trigger the genes. Make sense?

Standard formula does have casein (the protein in cow's milk). This is a common allergen. A lot of the "colic" or "gentle" formulas have soy milk instead... another common allergen. Allergies and intolerances cause inflammation in the digestive system and lead to all kinds of other problems. BUT... it's possible that your baby will be fine! A lot of babies are. If it turns out you don't have a choice, try not to stress out about it.
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Gluten free 08/08
Son has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn
Hashimoto's, MCAD, pregnancy loss at 17 weeks
HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac), HLA-DQB1*0301 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,3 (subtype 8,7)
Extensive family history of autoimmune disorders and related symptoms

#10 neesee

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 07:26 PM

All Enfamil forumlas are gluten-free. http://www.meadjohns...ngredients.html



neesee
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#11 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 08:13 PM

Advantages Of Breast Milk (from thenewparentsguide.com):

Pediatricians, midwives, nurses and even formula manufacturers all agree that breastfeeding is the best thing for your baby. With breast milk containing the perfect amount of antibodies, water, fat, carbohydrates, protein, vitamins and minerals, served at the perfect temperature and in the perfect container, formula will always come in second place as best for your baby. Below are some of the advantages of breastfeeding.

*

Breast milk is personalized for your baby – Your breast milk contains the perfect amount of everything your baby needs. With your breast milk continually changing to meet your baby’s needs, it’s always just right.

*

Protection from allergy – Your baby will be less likely to get allergies, which the strong proteins in cow’s milk can cause.

*

Can protect against respiratory problems like asthma.

*

Less chance of obesity – Since breast fed babies are able to follow the demands of their appetite, breastfeeding may help reduce the chance of becoming over-weight.

*

Nursing for at least one year has been shown to reduce stomach infections.

*

Easier to digest – Your breast milk is designed for your baby’s new sensitive digestive system. The amount of proteins and fats in your breast milk is individually tailored to your baby’s needs.

*

No constipation – Since breast milk has a natural laxative effect, infants who breastfeed will rarely become constipated.

*

Convenience – With breastfeeding there is no worry about keeping bottles and nipples clean, carrying bottled milk and keeping it at the proper temperature. Breast milk is always ready to use and at the perfect temperature.

*

Money saving – Breast milk is free, where bottle-feeding can get expensive for the formula, bottles and nipples.

*

Good for the mother – Breastfeeding creates a surge of the hormones in your body, which helps your uterus to contract and shrink to its pre-pregnant size. Breastfeeding can also delay the return of your periods providing you from a reprieve from that “time of the month”. Take note that this is not always the case; so don’t count on it.

*

Strong emotional mother-baby benefits – The skin to skin contact and cuddling during breastfeeding creates a wonderful bond between mother and baby. There is nothing better than the eye-to-eye contact, skin-to-skin contact, cuddling and talking time that takes place during breastfeeding.

*

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics - "Human milk is the preferred feeding for all infants, including premature and sick newborns."
"Epidemiologic research shows that human milk and breastfeeding of infants provide advantages with regard to general health, growth, and development, while significantly decreasing risk for a large number of acute and chronic diseases. Research in the United States, Canada, Europe, and other developed countries, among predominantly middle-class populations, provides strong evidence that human milk feeding decreases the incidence and/or severity of diarrhea, lower respiratory infection, otitis media, bacteremia, bacterial meningitis, botulism, urinary tract infection, and necrotizing enterocolitis. There are a number of studies that show a possible protective effect of human milk feeding against sudden infant death syndrome, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, lymphoma, allergic diseases and other chronic digestive diseases. Breastfeeding has also been related to possible enhancement of cognitive development."
"There are also a number of studies that indicate possible health benefits for mothers. It has long been acknowledged that breastfeeding increases levels of oxytocin, resulting in less postpartum bleeding and more rapid uterine involution. Lactational amenorrhea causes less menstrual blood loss over the months after delivery. Recent research demonstrates that lactating women have an earlier return to prepregnant weight, delayed resumption of ovulation with increased child spacing, improved bone remineralization postpartum with reduction in hip fractures in the postmenopausal period and reduced risk of ovarian cancer and premenopausal breast cancer." Read the complete American Academy of Pediatrics statement here or visit the AAP site for more information.
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#12 Fiddle-Faddle

 
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Posted 10 December 2008 - 08:31 PM

I also wanted to mention that all three of my kids were in daycare part-time. They were the only kids there who were breastfed past the time that they started daycare(9 weeks old), and all 3 of them got sick WAY, WAY less often than the other kids there.

One year, many of the kids in the infant room with my daughter ended up admitted to Children's Hospital with dehydration when a particularly nasty stomach virus went around. My daughter got the virus, but didn't become dehydrated, because she was breastfed.

You can breastfeed a baby with a stomach virus, and the breastmilk absorbs so quickly, even if they throw up 10 minutes later, a good deal of it will have been absorbed already, which both gives them the immunoglobulin A they need to fight the virus, and keeps them hydrated.

Contact your local LaLeche League about the breast augmentation question--I would bet that someone there could help you. Even those of us who NEVER had anything done to our breasts have had difficulty getting started nursing, and it's SO much easier if you have someone to coach you (doesn't that sound strange????) right from the beginning.

The best advice I got from anyone regarding the birth was to ask for the hospital's lactation consultant to come to your room BEFORE you even try to breastfeed. (My sister-in-law told me to ask the minute the baby popped out!)

Breastfeeding might be natural, but for some of us, it sure didn't feel natural right from the start! I felt like the world's biggest klutz--I couldn't figure out how to hold the baby (didn't help that he was only 4 1/2 pounds), I couldn't figure out how to get him to latch on, and I had no "built-in" instinct for it whatsoever.

But the Lactation Consultant helped me, and it worked!

Oh--I think the hospitals are still telling new moms to nurse every 2-3 hours, and that is NOT enough for most moms! Some moms can manage that way, but for most first-time moms, every 30-90 minutes during the day is the way to go!

I know it sounds insane, but the lactation consultant told me that this was best for several reasons:
1) the more you nurse during the day, the better the baby sleeps at night (TRUE!)
2) the more often you nurse during the first week, the less likely you are to get engorged. The reason many moms become engorged is that they aren't nursing often enough.
3)the more often you nurse during the first week, the sooner your milk comes in, and the more milk you produce.
4) the more often you nurse, the more often you get to sit down, put your feet up, and cuddle that baby!

The reason I thought I should provide you with this info is that I had a neighbor who had had breast surgery to remove some cysts, and she was told she might not be able to nurse.

She did produce milk, but was told that she didn't have enough. She was nursing the baby every 3-4 hours, as instructed by the doctor--and that's a formula schedule. Breast milk digests in less than an hour (because it's easy to digest); formula takes 3-4 hours (because it's not easy to digest).

And if you try, and it just doesn't work, well, at least you tried! Like the other poster said, don't sweat it!
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#13 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 11 December 2008 - 05:52 AM

You can contact La Leche League about nursing after breast augmentation. From what I remember, after augmentation usually isn't a problem. After reduction there are more likely to be problems. It has to do with how the surgery is done and whether or not the milk ducts are cut. Good luck.
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#14 lovegrov

 
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Posted 12 December 2008 - 01:03 PM

"Im not sure I know what normal time means????"

The pediatrician would be a better source of information than I would, but it's at least several months.
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#15 mandigirl1

 
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Posted 14 December 2008 - 07:55 PM

I also wanted to mention that all three of my kids were in daycare part-time. They were the only kids there who were breastfed past the time that they started daycare(9 weeks old), and all 3 of them got sick WAY, WAY less often than the other kids there.

One year, many of the kids in the infant room with my daughter ended up admitted to Children's Hospital with dehydration when a particularly nasty stomach virus went around. My daughter got the virus, but didn't become dehydrated, because she was breastfed.

You can breastfeed a baby with a stomach virus, and the breastmilk absorbs so quickly, even if they throw up 10 minutes later, a good deal of it will have been absorbed already, which both gives them the immunoglobulin A they need to fight the virus, and keeps them hydrated.

Contact your local LaLeche League about the breast augmentation question--I would bet that someone there could help you. Even those of us who NEVER had anything done to our breasts have had difficulty getting started nursing, and it's SO much easier if you have someone to coach you (doesn't that sound strange????) right from the beginning.

The best advice I got from anyone regarding the birth was to ask for the hospital's lactation consultant to come to your room BEFORE you even try to breastfeed. (My sister-in-law told me to ask the minute the baby popped out!)

Breastfeeding might be natural, but for some of us, it sure didn't feel natural right from the start! I felt like the world's biggest klutz--I couldn't figure out how to hold the baby (didn't help that he was only 4 1/2 pounds), I couldn't figure out how to get him to latch on, and I had no "built-in" instinct for it whatsoever.

But the Lactation Consultant helped me, and it worked!

Oh--I think the hospitals are still telling new moms to nurse every 2-3 hours, and that is NOT enough for most moms! Some moms can manage that way, but for most first-time moms, every 30-90 minutes during the day is the way to go!

I know it sounds insane, but the lactation consultant told me that this was best for several reasons:
1) the more you nurse during the day, the better the baby sleeps at night (TRUE!)
2) the more often you nurse during the first week, the less likely you are to get engorged. The reason many moms become engorged is that they aren't nursing often enough.
3)the more often you nurse during the first week, the sooner your milk comes in, and the more milk you produce.
4) the more often you nurse, the more often you get to sit down, put your feet up, and cuddle that baby!

The reason I thought I should provide you with this info is that I had a neighbor who had had breast surgery to remove some cysts, and she was told she might not be able to nurse.

She did produce milk, but was told that she didn't have enough. She was nursing the baby every 3-4 hours, as instructed by the doctor--and that's a formula schedule. Breast milk digests in less than an hour (because it's easy to digest); formula takes 3-4 hours (because it's not easy to digest).

And if you try, and it just doesn't work, well, at least you tried! Like the other poster said, don't sweat it!


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