Get email alerts Get E-mail Alerts Sponsor: Sponsor:

Ads by Google:

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE email alerts

Could I Have Celiac Disease?

3 posts in this topic

I've always had stomach problems, but over the last two years they have escalated. After a horrible breakup with a boyfriend, I lost twenty pounds. I started getting horrible stomach problems, terrible gas, reflux, burning sensations. My diet had changed, but it was actually a more healthy diet full of fruits and veggies and grains. It's two years later, and while I'm emotionally healed, my body is still troubled. I have constant gas and bloating and burning. I haven't gained an ounce, have actually lost weight even though I've been eating a ton. I've noticed changes in my teeth and nails, and sometimes I have strange sensations in my legs and tingling. They often fall asleep when I sleep. I've also been lactose intolerant on and off since I was a baby. My regular doctor suspected gluten intolerance and sent me to a specialist who laughed at me and told me I wasn't sick unless I was vomitting. He did do an endoscopy which turned out fine. He basically told me it's just my body and to deal with it, suggesting it's just IBS. Could I have this disease? Should I pursue testing?


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ads by Google:

You may very well be gluten intolerant, but without the intestinal damage severe enough to back up the diagnosis, they won't call it celiac disease.

Your best bet would be to check out the testing at Enterolab . The tests there are senstitive enough to pick up gluten intolerance (or gluten sensitivity) in it's early stages before the intestines are very damaged.

I've been where you are at, as have many other on this board. I've been laughed at by doctors and treated like a hypochondriac. But I am gluten intolerant and I am now on my way to better health. Thank God for Enterolab!

God bless,

Mariann :)


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

A visual inspection with an endoscope may not always reveal Celiac. While there is normally some inflamation present, it is not always the case. Furthermore, any inflamation that may have been present could easily have been attributed to some other cause.

You did not mention if biopsy samples were taken during the endoscopy. This is still the only sure fire method of verifying a Celiac diagnosis. The vilous atrophy associated with Celiac disease is not detectable via the endoscope. Several biopsies must be taken for external microscopic examination.

You also did not mention if you had the Celiac panel blood test. I would recommend you convince your G.I. doctor to at least have that done, and if it comes back positive, you may need to either get a second opinion of the biopsy slides, of if none were taken, to have the endoscopy procedure repeated. If your G.I. is unwilling to cooperate, I suggest finding a new one.

Best wishes,


Marion, IA


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
    • Total Posts
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • No, they didn't test my ttg igg, which I was surprised about considering the low IgA and positive DGP Igg. (The tests they did were IgA serum, Ttg IgA, DGP Igg and IgA and gene testing) If he ever returns my call, I was going to ask him about that.  He initially wanted to set up a endoscopy, but I told him I had one last year (with my prior GI) and he said he'd take a look at it and we'd go from there, except that was two weeks ago and I haven't heard from him.  My prior GI did take biopsies, I believe to rule out H.Pylori and I was told biopsy results were normal, however, I didn't receive a pathology report or anything like that.
    • What GEE EFF said!  Look for incubators, some business schools and even community colleges will have classes  about starting your own business & info about financing one.   There is a lot more to a business then just making and selling and getting someone else to buy the food  Taxes - paying and collecting in different cities or tax zones, health department codes, liability insurance (vehicular and general business ), renting a health dept approved kitchen,  a small business lawyer to help you "become a real company", permits, "booth fees", etc.  You can probably avoid some of it right now, just selling at a local farmer's market.   add- You might check with your state.  Some states have funds or low interest loans.  It helps if you are a "minority".  
    • i've researched a little about the genes i have you can find out if they are assosciated with other illnesses/autoimmune diseases. but i don't think knowing the details of every gene is going to help diagnose you any futher than just knowing you have the gene becuse either way it just means you have an increased chance.  if you're iga deficient did you have ttg igg as well?
    • I don't know if there are any grants specifically for gluten-free products Ennis.  But the SBA in USA deals with small business startups and may have information to help you.   There may be small business incubators in your area also.  Sometimes they are associated with university business schools and the SBA.  Marketing a product commercially and labeling it gluten-free is a possible issue though.  There are now FDA rules on labeling products gluten-free.  So you need to study those before getting to far into it.
    • Hi, WinterSong. What a lovely screen name! I don't know if what I have to share will be at all useful to you, but I often get areas of what is known as seborrheic dermatitis on my face and neck. They are common in front of my ears and around the chin - as well as in the folds near the nose and at the base of the neck. These patches are rougher than my normal skin, which is rather light and sensitive. These patches can appear whitish or pinkish in tone. I can get little flaky areas around my brows or even eyelashes that look almost like dandruff also. I seem to get these when I am eating more sugar than usual (i generally eat no to very little sugar) or when I have let up on my water drinking or am experiencing undue stress. The most effective method (for me) to address these patches is a combination of drinking lots of water and washing the areas with (believe it or not) dandruff shampoo; I was told to make a thick application of it and leave it on the areas for one to three minutes before rinsing thoroughly. It usually takes several applications over several days, but so far the protocol has cleared these patches, every time. I am recognizing and treating them sooner now. Your general physician or dermatologist could likely diagnose your trouble and suggest treatment for you, based on the diagnosis. Seborrheic dermatitis is fairly common and doctors may have other specific treatments as well when that is the diagnosis. I use good skincare products (gluten-free!) and find that ensuring that my skin is clean and well-hydrated, morning and evening, also helps avoid or treat flareups, which can be bothersome. I hope this information will be helpful to you in some way, WinterSong. Best to you! Mireille
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
    • Most Online

    Newest Member