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Homeless Celiacs


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49 replies to this topic

#1 Candy

 
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Posted 12 January 2009 - 10:57 AM

Where does a homeless Celiac go to get a good steak,onion and poatao dinner? And lots of milk and vitamins so our bones won't break? It could happen.

Me, I'm a real old teenageCeliac .....almost 40.
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I have DNA ancestry in NW.EUROPE,where CELIAC'S known to be common.

DEC. '05 TESTED POSITIVE for the Celiac GENES HLA-DQ2 , and DQ3 SUBTYPE DQ8
Celiac Negative Endoscopy-Aug.'08 - Diagnosed with Hernia and GERD(Gastric Esophageal Reflux Disease),and prescribed Acid Reducing Medication. I hadn't eaten WHEAT for a year prior to the Endoscopy-maybe that's why result was Negative. I need TTG test to determine Active Celiac Status/

Disgnosed with Sjogren's 9/19/2008- Internist referred me to Eye Doctor and Rheumatologist.

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#2 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 12 January 2009 - 02:59 PM

There is no place that I know of and this is one of the reasons why I try to donate regularly to my local food bank. I make sure everything is gluten-free including the toiletries and pet foods that I take.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#3 Jestgar

 
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Posted 12 January 2009 - 03:02 PM

There is no place that I know of and this is one of the reasons why I try to donate regularly to my local food bank. I make sure everything is gluten-free including the toiletries and pet foods that I take.

Me too.
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- James Watson

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- Ashleigh Brilliant

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#4 CaraLouise

 
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Posted 13 January 2009 - 04:01 AM

I think it would be a wonderful idea to start a non-profit for those with allergies and low income. Teaching them about good nutrition and how to eat good on a low budget.
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#5 Adelle

 
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Posted 13 January 2009 - 11:48 AM

Actually we do NOT give food to the food banks in our area. I've called every food bank I can find asking if the gluten-free food I donate would be set aside for gluten-free patrons (you know, like sugar free food for diabetics). NO. Each one of them told me that they just give people a box of whatever. They said that if someone doesn't "want" certain items they can return them (not in exchange for anything). So I don't donate to them. The local Celiac support group does tend to gather and give to individuals.... but that's it.

The answer is if you are homeless and Celiac, try not to be one or the other of those. :angry:
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#6 CaraLouise

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 03:59 AM

I have been thinking about this a lot lately, especially since it came up at this board. How would you go about starting a food pantry for those with extra special needs? I am really interested in this and would love to start one. I work at a church so I maybe it could be funded that way, what do you all think?
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#7 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:24 AM

I have been thinking about this a lot lately, especially since it came up at this board. How would you go about starting a food pantry for those with extra special needs? I am really interested in this and would love to start one. I work at a church so I maybe it could be funded that way, what do you all think?


I think that is a great idea. Does your church already have a food bank? If it does you could first go in and mark stuff that is safe. If not I would talk to 'the powers that be' at the church. If you get their permission then visit markets in your area and see if you can set up boxes for donations from the public to get started. Getting funding might be tough in these economic times, the poor are the first to lose when things get as rough as they are right now, but there may be many in your community that might help if they know there is a place to do so. If you have a local newspaper perhaps they might even run a piece on the food bank and your efforts to let the community know what you are doing.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#8 modiddly16

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 03:57 PM

I'm not trying to be insensitive here....but if you're homeless do you really care about the fact that you're a celiac. I mean if you're homeless...wouldn't you be more concerned with just eating in general...I don't know. I thought about this once before when I was visiting Atlanta and saw a bunch of homeless people. I just think if I was homeless...I'd probably worry about just eating in general. I think when y ou're homeless, your body might just react a lot different...I imagine when you're homeless you just learn to adjust and your body is a lot different
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#9 Jestgar

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 03:58 PM

If what you eat gives you diarrhea and inhibits absorption, you'll eventually die.
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"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
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#10 Aleshia

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:07 PM

I've actually thought about it alot over the last year or so... I talked to my husband about donating to food banks and stuff but he really likes to give to people in a more personal way so it sets an example for the kids so that they can see that you are helping real people and builds relationships in the process. I'm glad we didn't do the food bank thing though... since they don't set it aside... I think that is just crazy. I mean sure they are in need and its a thing of taking what you are given... but a food allergy or intolerance isn't just being a picky eater! anyway, if anyone comes up with a real tangible way of getting gluten-free foods to the people who need them I would be interested to hear it!
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#11 Lisa

 
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Posted 14 January 2009 - 06:12 PM

I have given my name and contact information if someone has gluten free needs through the Food Pantry. I haven't gotten any calls though.

You could contact your local Department of Social Services. They might know of a family in need.
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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#12 larry mac

 
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Posted 15 January 2009 - 09:48 AM

I'm guessing that very few homeless Celiacs have been diagnosed. The news stories suggest most people living on the streets have mental illness problems, drug and alcohol abuse problems, and don't always avail themselves of indigent health care services. Some are in and out of jail. They live in high-risk crime and abuse environments.

Throw in being exposed to the elements more, and an inferior or inconsistant diet, and it's a pretty good bet that many are in poor physical health.

Daily life is most likely more about survival (literally), and less about food intolerances, than those of us more fortunate.

best regards, lm
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colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

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#13 modiddly16

 
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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:43 PM

I'm guessing that very few homeless Celiacs have been diagnosed. The news stories suggest most people living on the streets have mental illness problems, drug and alcohol abuse problems, and don't always avail themselves of indigent health care services. Some are in and out of jail. They live in high-risk crime and abuse environments.

Throw in being exposed to the elements more, and an inferior or inconsistant diet, and it's a pretty good bet that many are in poor physical health.

Daily life is most likely more about survival (literally), and less about food intolerances, than those of us more fortunate.

best regards, lm



which is what I was basically trying to say but apparently didn't do a very good job!
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#14 Ms. Skinny Chic

 
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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:53 PM

Actually we do NOT give food to the food banks in our area. I've called every food bank I can find asking if the gluten-free food I donate would be set aside for gluten-free patrons (you know, like sugar free food for diabetics). NO. Each one of them told me that they just give people a box of whatever. They said that if someone doesn't "want" certain items they can return them (not in exchange for anything). So I don't donate to them. The local Celiac support group does tend to gather and give to individuals.... but that's it.

The answer is if you are homeless and Celiac, try not to be one or the other of those. :angry:



mmm.. It is a sad thought... Celiac disease & the gluten free diet can be rather expensive...
Maybe, someone should start a celiac foundation for the poor...
I can't imagine what is worst??? Starving or Eating gluten and getting painfully sick...
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#15 Jestgar

 
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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:58 PM

I'm guessing that very few homeless Celiacs have been diagnosed. The news stories suggest most people living on the streets have mental illness problems, drug and alcohol abuse problems, and don't always avail themselves of indigent health care services. Some are in and out of jail. They live in high-risk crime and abuse environments.

Throw in being exposed to the elements more, and an inferior or inconsistant diet, and it's a pretty good bet that many are in poor physical health.

Daily life is most likely more about survival (literally), and less about food intolerances, than those of us more fortunate.

best regards, lm

I guess I would have thought this as well, until I started going to the conferences at the hospital across the street from where I work. It's the county hospital, and also runs clinics in the homeless area of the city.

Celiac has not come up, but plenty of people are diagnosed with things that could be helped by diet (eg diabetes) or need meds that have to be taken with certain types of food (eg milk).

One case presented was a guy that had managed to maintain a strict vegan diet for enough years to become B-deficient.

Also, I have known people that lost their job and ended up living in their car for a period of time with NO medical issues at all.

There are people on my commute route that live under overpasses. They are always their and much of their existence depends on the people coming of the ferry to give them food. I can think of one with alcohol issues, but most have mental issues. One guy that had been 'adopted' by ferry commuters was as well taken care of as he would permit, including a bus ticket to visit his brother, and someone agreeing to take his dog when he died of cancer, which he chose not to treat.

There are many, many stories on the street...
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"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.




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