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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Brown Rice Syrup
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10 posts in this topic

I was looking through on e of my "forbidden list" from the hospital, and noticed that on the list of items was brown rice syrup. Does anybody know why? It seems non- intuitive that a rice product would be out. I do better with rules if I know the reasons behind them)

Libby

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Hi Libby,

It might be that they add something to it, like caramel coloring or something that makes it not gluten-free. I have a gluten-free cookbook that says Lundberg brand brown rice syrup is gluten free. So I suppose it depends on the brand...

God bless,

Mariann :)

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--they might add a malt... Seems like I read that somewhere...

Last time I tried a brown rice syrup it made me "gluten-sick"! But, I don't remember the brand!

Connie

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ive seen a lot of "gluten-free" things that had brown rice syrup in them and they all made me sick so i wouldnt take the chance.

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Can't imagine why your list would say that, unless you're also sweetener-free.

A great Rice Krispies sub, by Erehwon (pretty sure WIDEly enjoyed by celiacs), has it, as does my hazelnut milk.

I've never had a problem w/ either, nor w/ any other product w/ brown rice syrup.

I've also never heard of it having gluten.

And I'm really quite surprised to see others looking to blame it for glutening symptoms.

I've always thought the syrup itself is made from brown rice & brown rice only, tho it's often in products w/ a long list of ingred.

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My bottle of Lundberg Sweet Dreams Brown Rice Syrup says gluten free in big letters on the back and also "is gluten-free and wheat-free". The only ingredients listed are: organic brown rice, pure filtered water.

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Brown rice syrup often contains barley. For example, the Lundberg brand has always been safe, but there was a time when the brown rice syrup in Mrs. Mays products contained barley. You have to check on it to be safe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_rice_syrup

Brown rice syrup is a sweetener derived by culturing cooked rice with enzymes (usually from dried barley sprouts) to break down the starches, then straining off the liquid and cooking it until the desired consistency is reached. The final product is roughly 50% soluble complex carbohydrates, 45% maltose, and 3% glucose. The glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream immediately, while the maltose takes up to one and a half hours to be digested (see glycemic index), and the complex carbohydrates take from two to three hours, providing a steady supply of energy. Rice syrup has a shelf life of about a year, and once opened, should be stored in a cool, dry place.
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Keep in mind that the original post was over four years ago . . . as we all know, labels change. Some products may have had gluten then and OK now and vice versa.

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In regards to brown rice syrup, it is known to be high in arsenic even in organic foods.  It is something to be avoided.  Rice flour also has arsenic in it and how much depends on where it is grown.

 

 

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