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Article: Terrible Disease Found To Be Common
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This is one of the best articles I have read in quite a while. Has tons of info in one short article. -Jessica :rolleyes:

Posted on Sat, Mar. 19, 2005

Terrible disease found to be common

JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, Ph.D.

Knight Ridder Tribune News Service

Graduating medical students are sometimes told: "Half of what we have taught you is wrong . . . we just don't know which half." As amusing as this sounds, it rings true for a complex condition called celiac disease.

For decades medical students were taught that celiac disease is rare, that it affects the digestive tract and that afflicted children grow out of it. All these myths have now been disproved.

Celiac disease was once thought to affect only one child in 5,000. That would make it so uncommon that few doctors would ever make the diagnosis. With such statistics, a pediatrician might see a handful of cases in a lifetime.

But now researchers have found that celiac is actually quite common, affecting one person out of 100. Because genetics play a role, a person with a family member who has celiac disease has one chance in 22 of being affected.

Millions of Americans are afflicted, but most don't even know it. It might take years or even decades for the problem to be diagnosed. By then, it could be too late to undo the damage.

In celiac disease, the immune system reacts to a protein called gluten found in wheat, barley and rye. This triggers an inflammatory response in the small intestine that can interfere with efficient absorption of nutrients. Early recognition of digestive-tract involvement led doctors to pay attention to symptoms such as stomachaches and diarrhea.

But many patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome might not realize that their discomfort could be due to celiac disease. One study found that 12 percent of patients with IBS were gluten-intolerant.

Many patients don't have classic symptoms, however. Chronic fatigue and anemia that can't be attributed to other causes might well be signs of celiac disease. Other immune conditions, such as type-1 diabetes and thyroid disease, may be associated with celiac disease. A chronic, itchy rash known as dermatitis herpetiformis is another odd sign of an immune reaction to gluten.

People with gluten intolerance cannot absorb adequate amounts of calcium, magnesium, iron or other essential nutrients from food. As a result, their bones become weak and brittle.

New research shows that celiac disease is common among adults with osteoporosis, affecting more than three in 100 (Archives of Internal Medicine, Feb. 28, 2005). The investigators conclude that anyone diagnosed with osteoporosis should be screened for celiac disease.

Debilitating neurological disorders may also signal celiac disease. Some patients might appear to have early-onset dementia. Others experience chronic migraine or peripheral neuropathy (pain, tingling or burning in feet or hands).

For readers who would like to learn more about celiac disease, we offer a celiac disease of a one-hour radio interview with one of the world's leading experts. The show provides information on diagnosis and treatment. It is available for $15 from the People's Pharmacy (celiac disease-455), P.O. Box 52027, Durham, NC 27717-2027.

Many physicians practicing medicine today never learned about the range of problems celiac disease can cause. With evidence mounting that it is common, patients deserve to be tested. For those who are affected, a strict gluten-free diet can prevent many complications.

http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/living/11165587.htm

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That is a very good article--describes some general symptoms--some not so common ones--how common it really is and why it was never diagnosed...and its tie to osteoporosis, anemia, IBS...you're right--it's one of the better articles we've seen.

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That article is awesome! Now if only every GP and GI doctor could read it....

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These two articles were from yesterday...not very good, but interesting to compare them to such a good article:

http://www.clickondetroit.com/health/4300199/detail.html -- this article said that people in Celiacs, the body treats gluton, a protein found in wheat like poison.....no reference to barley, rye.... :D

http://sun.yumasun.com/artman/publish/arti...story_15403.php -- Can't really blame this person for not being as informative as in the other article; the celiac disease information is in an "Ask the Doctor" section.

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That article is awesome! Now if only every GP and GI doctor could read it....

I know! This is the type of article I would print out for people who don't understand, but are interested in learning more--or for regular doctors who don't know about celiac--or for confused relatives.......

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    • I'm glad I found these forums!  I will spend some more time this evening reading through them.  But I wanted to get my question out there just to see if anyone else might have answers quicker than I can sift through the forum for them.      I've been feeling terrible for about a year, and after an elimination diet last month, figured out that if nothing else, gluten/wheat is a problem.  After lots of research, I abandoned the elimination diet and added gluten back in, so that I could get tested for Celiac.   I was off gluten for 3 weeks, from mid-June until early July.  I've had it back in my diet for almost 3 weeks now.    My question is this: Since I was off gluten for 3 weeks, and now back on for almost 3, is that enough time on to yield a positive Celiac blood test, if that indeed is what I have?  All the research I've done says 4-6 weeks for a gluten challenge, but is that really necessary if I was only not eating it for 3 weeks?  I am desperate to get this testing done and over with.  I feel terrible all the time and getting through the day is a struggle.  My doctor ran allergy panels already and everything came back clear except for a mild wheat allergy.  So if nothing else, I'll have to give up wheat for sure at the end of all this.  I get the feeling she doesn't know a ton about Celiac though, so I'm doing a lot of the research on my own. Any advice or information would be so appreciated! 
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    • Hi Megan, Did the doctor test you for celiac disease?  You really shouldn't go gluten-free until all the testing for celiac disease is completed.  It is a little odd for a doctor to tell you to go gluten-free for no reason IMHO.  Did he/she explain the reason for it? Personally, I have learned over the years what I can eat safely and what I can't.  Occasionally I get hit but it is rare.  Simplifying your diet is a good first step.  Avoiding processed foods for a while and dairy also is good.  I suggest any change you make last for a month at least. Then try the food again. If you are eating 100 random ingredients/foods each day it is hard to figure these things out.  If you reduce it to a much smaller number of foods then things become simpler. Welcome to the forum!
    • Finally, proof that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is real. ... for the 30 percent of consumers who choose to buy gluten-free products and the 41 percent of ... View the full article
    • hey! Wondering if I can get some good info/help from you guys! I just signed up for this website couple weeks ago. Whenever I would Google things this was always the first to pop up and I always found info on things I googled. I am pretty new to the gluten free thing. I had a hernia surgery back in Jan and after that I kept throwing up after eating, the DR. told me it was probably acid reflex caused from surgery but all the meds I tried nothing helped. I went back and was told to cut gluten out. I have been doing so since. When I first started I felt like I had it under control and didn't throw up for 3 weeks, now I find it happening more often. I do buy gluten-free things and read labels to the best I can. My frustration comes from not knowing what its from. How do you know if its from the day before or what you just ate? I hate not knowing. Especially when I haven't had gluten (or so I think) I have been keeping a journal but I just find it so hard. I get this feeling in my stomach and can feel it in my throat. Sometimes I puke once sometimes 5 times! Yesterday for lunch I made an omlet with chicken mushrooms and feta cheese. I threw up almost 20 min after. I have also tried the no dairy thing and it doesn't seem to make a difference so I don't think dairy is an issue as well.
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