Jump to content





   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

PCOS And Celiac


  • Please log in to reply

24 replies to this topic

#1 Eliza13

 
Eliza13

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 166 posts
 

Posted 18 January 2009 - 02:14 PM

My doc confirmed that I have polycystic ovaries. I explained to her that when I don't eat gluten & millet that I get my period. When I eat gluten and millet the opposite happens: I don't get my period at all.

My doctor says that there is no relationship between my diet and the absent periods, but I beg to differ. The minute I change my eating, my menstrual cycle is affected. Does anyone know whether there is indeed a connection between celiac and absent periods. If there is a connection, how does it happen? I'm insisting here that there is a connection because I see it happening, but it's hard when you doctor denies the relationship. Who is right????
  • 0
Diagnosed by my doctor on the basis of symptoms only (May 2005). My symptoms include:

-amenorhea (all my life)
-high prolactin levels
-major bloating ("Are you pregnant?")
-swollen ankles
-possible DH: had the rash on my elbows and scalp (gone now)
-joint pain
-childhood arthritis
-all dairy allergy
-dry skin
-fat in stool sample (no connection was made at the time...I was being tested for something else...When the doctor told me of the fat I replied by saying: "I eat alot of olive oil". DUH!!!!)
-mother is allergic to wheat
-ravenous appetite: I eat for 5 people
-light coloured stool
-pass stool 7 times a day sometimes
-hemorrhoids
-get the hiccups alot (not sure if this is related)
-some reflux

I'm sure there are more that I don't recall at the moment. SIGH.

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 Mother of Jibril

 
Mother of Jibril

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,000 posts
 

Posted 18 January 2009 - 02:57 PM

I would trust your body over your doctor!! Personally, I have the opposite reaction to gluten (and corn)... it makes my periods long and heavy. Before I stopped eating gluten I had been having painful abdominal cramps, bloating, and continuous spotting for about six months :( I went to my OB/GYNs office about it... once they ruled out infection they were out of answers.
  • 0
Gluten free 08/08
Son has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn
Hashimoto's, MCAD, pregnancy loss at 17 weeks
HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac), HLA-DQB1*0301 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,3 (subtype 8,7)
Extensive family history of autoimmune disorders and related symptoms

#3 *lee-lee*

 
*lee-lee*

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 284 posts
 

Posted 18 January 2009 - 04:19 PM

I have the opposite reaction to gluten (and corn)... it makes my periods long and heavy. Before I stopped eating gluten I had been having painful abdominal cramps


this is interesting...i didn't really get my period until i was 15 but when it finally regulated to every month, it was terrible. extremely heavy with terrible cramps. it was unbearable so my mom took me to the gyno and i was put on birth control. that helped tremendously and i've been "regular" for over 12 years now. i wonder what will happen when i go off BC eventually and continue not eating gluten? i have noticed it's lighter even still since beginning the diet 6 months ago.
  • 0
5/23/2008 - blood positive for antibodies
6/24/2008 - negative biopsy
8/11/2008 - DQ2 gene present

7/1/2008 - gluten-free
(and dairy-light until 12/1/2008)

#4 Fiddle-Faddle

 
Fiddle-Faddle

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,159 posts
 

Posted 18 January 2009 - 05:29 PM

My endocrinologist initially told me that a low-carb diet is always recommended for PCOS patients.

When she diagnosed me with celiac (based on bloodwork and DH), she said, 'Hmmm, maybe the reason a low-carb diet works for PCOS is that it's low-gluten or no-gluten."

If your doctor doesn't see this, then maybe it's time to find another doctor, especially as yours doesn't seem to be interested in what YOU experience, and doesn't take you seriously. :ph34r:

I think your instinct is right on the mark; I don't think much of your doctor's instincts (if he even has any).
  • 0

#5 rubyred

 
rubyred

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 44 posts
 

Posted 18 January 2009 - 06:01 PM

I believe there is a connection, in my opinion at least. I missed my period for about 5 months prior to going gluten free (when my gluten intolerance symptoms were probably the worst in my life). I was tested for Celiac through one blood test (not the panel) and an endoscopy; my doctor said I didn't have Celiac but offered no other help (I'm getting a second opinion because the endoscopy showed blunted villi and muscosa atrophy). I decided to go gluten free on my own and what do you know....all of my symptoms subsided, including my period. I have been regular ever since going gluten free. Before I went gluten free, I went to my PCP who said I might have PCOS. I haven't been tested and didn't follow up with that though because for the last 5 or 6 months, my period has been regular. I really do think there is a connection, and it makes me question even more if I really do have Celiac. I know that gluten is affecting more than just my stomach.
  • 0

#6 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,741 posts
 

Posted 19 January 2009 - 03:06 AM

The connections between the female reproductive system and celiac are really poorly understood by doctors. There is a definate connection though and it has been noted in medical journals. Celiac can and does effect us. It can cause premature menopause, infertility and effect our ability to carry a baby to term when we do concieve. They don't know why but the correlation is there. One of the first things my OB/GYN said after my diagnosis was that my periods might return. They didn't but for many others they do.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#7 Lux

 
Lux

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 100 posts
 

Posted 19 January 2009 - 05:53 AM

Hiya,

I didn't get my period for three years and had always attributed this to my polycystic ovaries. I went gluten free and now I get it every month...

Coincidence? Really??
  • 0

#8 Lisa

 
Lisa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,799 posts
 

Posted 19 January 2009 - 07:09 AM

This just crossed my path from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. For those with stories..

3. The NFCA is developing a program related to women's health and wellness with a focus on reproductive health issues. Our goal is to escalate the recognition of celiac disease as a factor in several health issues facing women. Personal stories are an effective tool for relaying the true impact of this autoimmune disease. We invite you to share your story concerning women's health with us. Please send your stories to Nancy Ginter at ginter@CeliacCentral.org.
  • 0
Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#9 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,741 posts
 

Posted 19 January 2009 - 08:01 AM

This just crossed my path from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. For those with stories..

3. The NFCA is developing a program related to women's health and wellness with a focus on reproductive health issues. Our goal is to escalate the recognition of celiac disease as a factor in several health issues facing women. Personal stories are an effective tool for relaying the true impact of this autoimmune disease. We invite you to share your story concerning women's health with us. Please send your stories to Nancy Ginter at ginter@CeliacCentral.org.



Thanks so much for posting this info.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#10 princesskill

 
princesskill

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36 posts
 

Posted 29 March 2009 - 04:24 PM

i also have PCOS. on one of the pcos message boards im on there were a few articles about people with PCOS often having auto-immune diseases and the idea that maybe PCOS is also an auto immune disorder. i tried to find them but cant at the moment. anyway there are a lot of people on the PCOS bord that are celiac so there very well could be a connection.
  • 0

dx PCOS (poly-cystic ovarian syndrome) winter 2008
dx Celiac March 12/09

Liz/26/Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


#11 MaryJones2

 
MaryJones2

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,037 posts
 

Posted 29 March 2009 - 06:47 PM

I think it's certainly possible (although unproven currently). The underlying cause of PCOS is insulin resistance and it is often treated with the diabetes drug Metformin. There have been a few studies linking PCOS with Hashimoto's so the autoimmune connection is definitely there. It's generally accepted that if you have one autoimmune disease you are prone to developing others.
  • 0

---------------------------------

MP - celiac for 10 years

 


#12 rumbles

 
rumbles

    Advanced Community Member

  • Guests
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 114 posts
 

Posted 15 April 2009 - 07:44 AM

Interesting! - My doctor told me just the opposite, saying that
there absolutely is a link between PCOS and celiac. (It took
about five months from the point that I went gluten free, but
I haven't had cyst problems since them, - I use to get them
like clockwork, and sure don't miss them!)

If you consider that one of the symptoms of celiac is infertility,
then it shouldn't take too much of a leap to understand that
gluten can have a direct effect on the ovaries.
  • 0

#13 SalmonNationWoman

 
SalmonNationWoman

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts
 

Posted 16 April 2009 - 12:44 PM

Traditionl Chinese Medicine and Naturopathy both see a connection between diet and reproductive issues in both women and men. Why is it that allopathic medicine doesn't? I don't know but if you always remember this when working with an MD, you'll get a lot farther towards proper treatment and control of your care.
  • 0

#14 SleepyMommy

 
SleepyMommy

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
 

Posted 26 April 2009 - 08:17 AM

*Gasp!*

I have been going through HORRID periods my whole life, and CLEARLY have hormonal issues besides that. Docs can't figure it out. They'll say it sounds like PCOS, but tests never show it. My menstrual cycle is like dying a horrid death every month! Now that I'm gluten-free, I wonder what will happen. (I'm only about 2 weeks into my gluten-free journey.)

Frankly, I've never been on a site where symptom after symptom is being addressed! Not just PCOS stuff, but everything. Exciting.
  • 0

#15 SalmonNationWoman

 
SalmonNationWoman

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts
 

Posted 27 April 2009 - 05:27 PM

I'm about 16 months gluten-free and had horrid periods before. It's taken a while but I don't experience the severe cramps, clotting or as heavy bleeding. On a scale of 0-10 with 10 being the worst pain/adverse menstrual problems I was 9.5-10 pre-diagnosis. Id' say I'm a 3 now and I'm out of my supplements.

I'm also perimenopausal at age 49 and not experiencing any new problems. It makes me wonder A LOT if all this BS about PMS, PMDD, etc, aren't varying degrees of GI. In the recorded history of food, wheat grains were viewed as poison for centuries. I really wonder if ANYBODY should eat wheat.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: