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Question About Raw Honey


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26 replies to this topic

#16 Syrinx413

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:24 PM

Chasbari--you are brave! I got rid of all flours when I went gluten-free. The only thing my husband has is bread/buns, and beer. He even eats gluten-free pasta now! When I returned home, it was like I had been glutened, and I'm not sure what from, since I hadn't eaten anything out of the ordinary when I got back. I'm basically grasping at straws here. If it's a CC issue that's causing it, my husband already said he'd go gluten-free. I'd prefer not to do that if I don't have to, as it would be MUCH more expensive. He's also a ridiculously picky eater and can't/won't eat half the stuff I will.

RiceGuy--I am so glad that you believe this could be a real possibility! I feel like I'm going crazy some days, but my symptoms and problems HAVE to be related somehow to where I live. I wasn't even aware of harvest schedules before. I only figured out the link when making a timeline for my doctor, a timeline of symptoms and incidences of being ill. During each harvest, my symptoms would worsen and I would be VERY sick.

I'm definitely staying away from the honey, I guess DH will have to eat it.

The nearest large city in the area is the ACTUAL windiest city in N. America. This whole area is constantly dusty and windy. It's impossible to escape. We also live in an older building and the windows do not seal properly, so we always have dust/dirt from the outside getting in that way. I think we will definitely be moving much sooner than we anticipated.


I know I'm a year or so late here, but I'm wondering whether your symptoms subsided when you stopped eating the honey? I have all of the sudden had a return of symptoms, and I thinking it might some honey from the local farmer's market that I recently started eating a lot of. I'm going to stop and see what happens.
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#17 CeliacAndCfsCrusader

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Posted 22 May 2010 - 10:20 PM

Just my two cents:

I do think being in a heavily "infested" wheat harvest area may be an issue. I live in Denver and it's often windy here too, you can see the dirt and pollen being blown for miles. Remember, you have to INGEST the wheat to cause your Gastro symptoms, not simply "be around it". If it's that busy of an Agricultural area, this may be fairly easy to do.

I love the air cleaner filter idea, brilliant.

Here are some other thoughts.

I'm highly sensitive, but honey has never bothered me. I do buy local honey, but most of this isn't necessarily harvested near the major wheat producing areas in CO, maybe it's been luck so far.

Do you use separate toasters in your house? This is a must! Some go so far as having to use separate everything.

Does your hubby stick his knife in the butter, jam, peanut butter, mayo, etc etc when he uses it? Does it CC you?

Do you share a bread machine?

You should eliminate the possible CC in your household first, IMHO, before you panic. Have him go gluten-free for two weeks and see how you do!

Best of luck.

PS: You're not any more crazy than the rest of us trying to figure this all out!
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#18 minamoo

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 04:27 AM

I apologize if this question has been asked before.

Normally, I would assume that raw honey is gluten-free and safe to eat. BUT, what if the beehives are kept in an area that grows wheat and/or is surrounded by wheat fields? Is there a chance that gluten would be in the raw honey, or is that me being a worrywart?

The reason I ask is because I ate some raw honey in my pumpkin puree last night, and I had stomach issues all night and currently am experiencing all the warm, fuzzy feelings of a good glutening.

It could very well be something else causing this, but I'd like to know if this raw honey is OK to eat in my situation--we have a HUGE tub of it and I would hate to waste it!


The bad news about honey is that manufacturers are cheating by adding Glucose syrup to the honey. I've been ill and couldn't understand why. After ruling out all possibilities I got to Honey. I confirmed the Gluten content by using a Gluten flow through test on expensive 100% pure Honey. I was shocked to discover the honey was full of Gluten! Now I steer clear of all Honey in the shops.
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#19 rdh22_99

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:15 AM

Hello all! I am new to the forum and was excited to see this topic! For the past 2 weeks I have made gluten free pancakes on Sunday morning and have felt sick afterwards for the entire day. I used 100% pure maple syrup and the gluten free pancake mix. Well, the pancake mix calls for honey. I found it hard to believe that this would make me sick and I feared that maybe my gluten intolerance diagnosis was crap now. I researched online and found that honey can contain maltose. I was floored. I also found out that commercial honey is usually thinned and has syrup added to it. I bought a new pancake mix that does not require honey so I will let you know how it goes! ;)
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#20 psawyer

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:35 AM

Maltose, despite the name, is not malt and is gluten-free. It is a form of sugar.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#21 rdh22_99

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 06:04 PM

Maltose, despite the name, is not malt and is gluten-free. It is a form of sugar.


Well that's good to know thank goodness! Thank you for the info. I do know that the honey I used was commercial, but I guess I'll have to look for other ingredients that may be the culprit. Totally made me sick twice now. Hmmmmm.....going to have me thinking now.
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#22 sensiblyparanoid

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 12:49 PM

Hi, guys. Just wanted to mention that I recently read a beekeeper's post, & that I was totally CRUSHED , as I LOVE HONEY!! (Especially the Really Raw Honey)! He was sharing the fact that when pollen is scarce, bees are known to roll around in any kind of dust, such as open flour sacks, coal dust, etc... I'm quoting what he posted below:

"As a beekeeper, I would like to adress a topic I haven't seen much about. Bee Pollen. During the times when actual pollen is scarce, bees gather up any kind of dust, including grain dust...

http://www.hiltonpon...Week060122.html

Chip Taylor, the University of Kansas entomologist best known for his project on Monarch Watch butterfly tagging, tells us dust collecting by Honeybees is actually quite common in spring. If pollen is unavailable, Honeybees collect all sorts of dust that contains carbon--even coal dust. Dr. Taylor reports that in open markets in Central and South America it's not uncommon to see bees collecting flour from open sacks or spillage--a behavior also well-known in Africa--and that beekeepers sometimes put out "pollen substitutes" such as high-protein soy flour in spring and fall."

(NOTE: The above post was quoted from "acjeff" at another celiac forum/blog).


I have no idea if there really is such a thing as "gluten-free" honey- trust me, I've been looking! Now I know WHY I used to be bent over in PAIN after eating some pure raw bee pollen! God Bless & be well.
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#23 T.H.

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 04:34 PM

Wow - I'd never heard of the dust collecting. That...might explain a few things with honey. Interesting.

Re: the original question on wheat fields (I know it's old, but we're all interested again, yeah?). I do know that some of the protein used in the making of honey remains in the honey afterward. The protein is not completely destroyed when the bees make the honey.

This is a problem for the corn allergic, because some beekeepers are feeding bees corn syrup, and the corn still remains in the honey afterward in high enough amounts to cause an allergic reaction.

I'd never heard of any farmers using wheat based syrups, but this got me curious, and now...now I know better. Syrups based on wheat aren't used, but wheat can be used as part of a supplemental feeding of bees during the winter time.

"None of the protein supplemental foods fed to honey bees is a complete replacement for natural pollen; however, several brewer’s yeast products, Wheat, and soybean flour, fed singly or in combination, can be used to improve the nutrition of colonies when natural pollen is scarce. Cane or beet sugar and isomerized corn sirup can be used to supplement the bees’ diet of nectar or honey." http://www.beesource...y-bee-colonies/


This is older information (although put out by the USDA), and so I don't know how common the practice is for most beekeepers. Probably worth checking out, if you think you've reacted to honey, yeah?

Another issue that might make one ill (although may not be gluten related) is all the medication they add to the beehives now. Mite infestations are so ubiquitous that almost all hives have to be medicated. One way of doing this is to put in strips with the medication, for the bees to walk over and spread around. It's preferred that this is done when the honey isn't being made, but it's not required.

I haven't been able to get a lot of information on what's in the medication, unfortunately, so I have no idea if it's gluten free or not.
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#24 psawyer

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 05:00 PM

From Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide, by Shelley Case, 2008 edition, page 33:

Foods allowed: Honey

The same information appears in the 2006 edition, also on page 33.

Shelley Case is a recognized expert on celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. I don't really know about the beekeeper.
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Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

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#25 T.H.

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 06:44 PM

...Foods allowed: Honey

...Shelley Case is a recognized expert on celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. I don't really know about the beekeeper.


I wouldn't deny that there are experts on the disease, and the diet, but honestly? We're nowhere near a full understanding of this disease or the foods involved, so their expertise only stretches so far. Even the experts are still learning and refining what is 'true' about our disease, as new information comes to light. Honey is probably fine for most celiacs; I honestly don't know. But based on what people have said here, some people are having issues with it.

We wouldn't be human if we didn't question why, or search for answers. I don't think anyone here was trying to imply that we should all run away screaming from honey if we're a celiac. I think it's more that we're trying to search for why some of us seem to have trouble with it. We know that people like Shelley Case think it's fine for us; that's why we ate it in the first place.

Unfortunately, Shelley doesn't have the answer for why we got sick, which is why we're talking here, yes?

Relying solely on the experts, for a lot of us, is agreeing to lie down and get sicker. Because if they're right, then all our issues and problems are just in our heads. All the foods that make us react, consistently, couldn't possibly be a problem.

Well, for years, celiacs' neurological issues were 'all in their head' or solely due to malnutrition, too. Now the experts have had to eat their words as they find evidence to the contrary. The allowed/not allowed list of foods has changed over the years, as well. Researchers still haven't even done studies on some of the grains that are listed as safe for Celiacs to eat. Until recently, they'd only done studies on oats, rice and corn to see if they were safe.

We're nowhere near the end of research on this disease OR the foods that we can have. If we were, I figure probably a lot more of us would be doing better than we are.
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T.H.

Gluten free since August 10, 2009.
21 years with undiagnosed Celiac Disease

23 years with undiagnosed sulfite sensitivity

25 years with undiagnosed mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) 

 

Daughter: celiac and MCAD positive

Son: gluten intolerant
Father, brother: celiac positive


#26 lovegrov

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 07:49 PM

I eat honey with no fe3ar.

richard
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#27 Happytobefree

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 08:41 AM

Hello all! I am new to the forum and was excited to see this topic! For the past 2 weeks I have made gluten free pancakes on Sunday morning and have felt sick afterwards for the entire day. I used 100% pure maple syrup and the gluten free pancake mix. Well, the pancake mix calls for honey. I found it hard to believe that this would make me sick and I feared that maybe my gluten intolerance diagnosis was crap now. I researched online and found that honey can contain maltose. I was floored. I also found out that commercial honey is usually thinned and has syrup added to it. I bought a new pancake mix that does not require honey so I will let you know how it goes! ;)


A little late.

I would be concerned with the pan that was used to make the pancakes. When going gluten-free, I think it is important to consider all the places you have put wheat containing products and the likelihood that residual proteins have remained there.
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