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Other Intolerances


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#1 thleensd

 
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Posted 01 March 2009 - 11:35 PM

I was diagnosed two and a half weeks ago. Been totally gluten free for three weeks (gluten light before I *knew*). I'm getting stronger, and usually feeling better, but I am definitely reacting to SOMETHING.

I've exorcised my house of all gluten! Including lotions, soaps, etc! So, I've been very careful. Only eating at home, new toaster, etc.

Went to an allergist, and have ZERO food allergies according to the 89 scratches on my back.

That being said, there is something I'm reacting to, and I can't figure out what. After feeling much better for over a week - my throat feels tight (might be a sensation in my esophagus...that used to happen when I ate gluten), and I feel anxious. Those things haven't been happening since I went gluten-free.

If I don't have any "allergies" ...how do I figure out what the reaction is to? Do you have any good resources?

I've heard of the Enterolab stuff...but I'm not sure how much I trust it. I know there are people on both sides of that issue with plenty to say. I'd be interested in hearing stories about experiences with them as well.

Frustrated. =(
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Diagnosed 2/12/09 by biopsy after years of anemia, neuropathy, dizziness, brain fog, pain and more.
Negative blood tests (following gluten light diet)

Still healing with time, harmony, and good food.
Grain-free 1/11/11

Blogging Gluten-Free

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#2 mushroom

 
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Posted 02 March 2009 - 12:53 AM

I was diagnosed two and a half weeks ago. Been totally gluten free for three weeks (gluten light before I *knew*). I'm getting stronger, and usually feeling better, but I am definitely reacting to SOMETHING.

I've exorcised my house of all gluten! Including lotions, soaps, etc! So, I've been very careful. Only eating at home, new toaster, etc.

Went to an allergist, and have ZERO food allergies according to the 89 scratches on my back.

That being said, there is something I'm reacting to, and I can't figure out what. After feeling much better for over a week - my throat feels tight (might be a sensation in my esophagus...that used to happen when I ate gluten), and I feel anxious. Those things haven't been happening since I went gluten-free.

If I don't have any "allergies" ...how do I figure out what the reaction is to? Do you have any good resources?

I've heard of the Enterolab stuff...but I'm not sure how much I trust it. I know there are people on both sides of that issue with plenty to say. I'd be interested in hearing stories about experiences with them as well.

Frustrated. =(

The only way I know of is an elimination diet. However, you haven't told us what symptoms you had before giving up gluten. Were they gastrointestinal, neurological, or what? The answer to your question would really depend on knowing how you were before. Did you have a biopsy showing villous atrophy? This would indicate that you should eliminate lactose, for example.

Let us know your symptoms, before and after, and what you are eating now and we would be better able to offer suggestions.
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Potato starch free July 2009
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#3 MELINE

 
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Posted 02 March 2009 - 02:28 AM

add one food every 4 days and right down your reactions. the reactions may come within 2-72 hours, that is why you must wait for 4 days before you introduce something else.

Meline
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#4 Mother of Jibril

 
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Posted 02 March 2009 - 04:41 AM

Is there anything you started eating a lot more of when you went gluten-free? For me, that was corn... and it gives me the same kind of abdominal pain as gluten :(

The most common foods that cause problems for people (intolerances) include dairy, corn, soy, grains in general, and nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers, eggplant). An elimination diet is honestly the best way to diagnose an intolerance, so if there's something you suspect is a problem try keeping that food out of your diet for a couple of weeks and see how you feel. If you're still not sure, you can do the "challenge" (for dairy, that might mean a couple slices of cheese and a glass of milk each day). If you think a lot of foods are causing you problems and you're not sure where to start, you could try a good basic diet like the SCD to let your intestines calm down. And then... you could slowly try adding those other foods back in.

You might also want to start keeping a food diary along with some notes about symptoms you're experiencing! I've been doing this for a month now and it really helps. I had to eliminate a few more foods due to allergies, but it's encouraging to see the progress I've made.
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Gluten free 08/08
Son has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn
Hashimoto's, MCAD, pregnancy loss at 17 weeks
HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac), HLA-DQB1*0301 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,3 (subtype 8,7)
Extensive family history of autoimmune disorders and related symptoms

#5 thleensd

 
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Posted 02 March 2009 - 10:02 PM

Wow. Ok. Here goes:

Probably some less significant things before this past year (except low iron for all of adult life), but...

One year ago I got the flu (real flu, not stomach flu). Developed lower right abdominal pain. Nearly passed out, was very weak, and had my first ambulance ride. Tests, tests, tests, you know the story. After that, I had a very hard time becoming functional. My digestion stopped (no BM of significance for weeks), went on a near liquid diet (like ensure, but with gluten in it! I'm SURE that helped!). Hard lumps in my GI track, but not a "blockage". I was very, very fatigued (like, needed help to function - eat, use restroom) and missed over a month of work. Iron dropped to 4, Ferritin dropped to 2. Lost too much weight.

Since then, I've had: tingling fingers and toes, crazy fatigue, constipation, anxiety, feeling of regurgitation (without acid), abdominal pain, tight throat, dizziness, light headedness, brain fog, hard to swallow, extremely tired limbs, and all of the aches and pains that go with malnutrition. Dx by biopsy. Blood work was negative, but I was already eating gluten-light for months.

My body is getting stronger, but I'm still having intermittent feeling of pressure in my throat (feels tight, but I don't think it's actually my wind pipe closing, I think it's my stomach/esophagus). It's actually kind of scary. Allergist assured me I'm not allergic to anything so I shouldn't worry. I recognized the feeling from when I ate wheat... which is why I feel like it's food. Maybe it is corn. I'll lay off it for a few days. I think I haven't allowed enough time in between new foods and supplements.

Hard for me to figure out because I've never had allergies...not to anything. And, I'm getting really tired of eating plain chicken and rice. I've been experimenting with plain diets since November, but either I'm not a linear enough thinker and organizer (or too ADD or something!) to figure it out. I feel like I need a chart and someone telling me what to eat and when. Is there a book out there that will do this for me??

Thanks.
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Diagnosed 2/12/09 by biopsy after years of anemia, neuropathy, dizziness, brain fog, pain and more.
Negative blood tests (following gluten light diet)

Still healing with time, harmony, and good food.
Grain-free 1/11/11

Blogging Gluten-Free

#6 Mother of Jibril

 
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Posted 03 March 2009 - 05:43 AM

Hard for me to figure out because I've never had allergies...not to anything. And, I'm getting really tired of eating plain chicken and rice. I've been experimenting with plain diets since November, but either I'm not a linear enough thinker and organizer (or too ADD or something!) to figure it out. I feel like I need a chart and someone telling me what to eat and when. Is there a book out there that will do this for me??


I'm really sorry you're having such a hard time! :(

I never had allergies either (tested negative six months ago), but they CAN develop in adults. Last month I had an anaphylactic reaction to a soup with too many members of the "umbelliferae" family (celery, parsnips, carrots, parsley). Intolerances don't show up on skin tests, but the symptoms can really affect the quality of your life.

"Breaking the Vicious Cycle" is a good book. You can also check out some of the SCD websites like www.pecanbread.com. They'll give you very specific instructions and lots of recipes. :P
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Gluten free 08/08
Son has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn
Hashimoto's, MCAD, pregnancy loss at 17 weeks
HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac), HLA-DQB1*0301 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,3 (subtype 8,7)
Extensive family history of autoimmune disorders and related symptoms

#7 AliB

 
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Posted 03 March 2009 - 10:51 AM

I have been recovering on the SCD too and it has been very helpful for many of my previous health issues, most of which are either much improved or gone completely, however, I still have issues with my digestion and am coming round to the idea that it may be due to a lack of certain enzymes.

I suspect that has been the problem for a long time but it got to the point in the end where it just could hardly cope any more. Certainly carbs have been a problem for me for years and having now been doing some research on this I suspect that the damage that the 'bad food' has done to my body has somehow restricted its ability to produce enough of the relevant enzymes to enable my gut to digest carbs properly.

Other people may have problems with protein digestion or fat digestion due to a lack of protease or lipase, etc. My Doc changed my Diabetes drug and everything fell apart after that - I suspect that somehow what digestive enzyme activity I had left was diverted as my body struggled to cope with the darned drug.

When I eat I get a banging/thumping going on that I can feel through my body - I have noticed that the only time it tends to go is if I just eat mainly raw food and that, I am sure, is because of the enzymes in the food.

Apart from fresh fruit and veg (and intensively farmed stuff grown in poor soil will be much lower in enzymes too) most of us get very little in the way of any supplemental enzymes. Illness, trauma, stress and injury can further deplete our body of the enzymes we do have. Pasteurisation kills all the enzymes in the milk so we get nothing from that - the lipase for instance which could digest the fats in the milk is not there, and that is one of many. Traditional diets would include things like yogurt, kefir, natto, tofu, tempeh, and other fermented foods, all of which help to supply enzymes, and most of which the like of us eating the 'Western' diet would rarely, if ever, touch.

I always said that we don't need carbs to function. That, to a certain extent is true. I would always pull up the example of the Inuit who eat mostly protein and fat and very little, if any, carbs, yet function quite adequately on their diet - have plenty of energy, are rarely sick and manage to function in one of the coldest parts of the earth. What I hadn't realised until I was researching the enzyme thing is that they eat a lot of (often quite putrid) fermented fish, whale, walrus, etc., foods that make up staples, so their diet is full of enzymes.

The digestion uses a huge amount of energy and the greater the lack of enzymes the harder it has to struggle to digest the food. I don't know about you but I have always gotten more fatigued after eating than at any other time. I used to get times when I could easily have laid down in the street I was so exhausted. It's been like living on borderline Chronic Fatigue all my life.

I am researching enzymes at the moment - I have realised to my cost that not all brands are good - I just took some Solgar enzymes for a few days and it has knocked me right back! I suspect that I did not need the Betaine which ended up over-acidifying my stomach and damaging my gut again, so I am looking for a good source without that. I understand that plant-based ones are better than animal-based too, which is what the Solgar are - with Ox Bile - since when do Oxen eat a roast dinner?? Is it even the same as our bile? Yuk.

I tell you, it is a nightmare trying to figure out what is wrong, and when you do get some idea it is a minefield trying to find the right remedy!

My theory on your sudden descent into food intolerance is that the bout of flu drew so much enzyme activity in order to facilitate recovery, that it may well have left you deplete of enzymes in other areas.

People often say that it took a trigger to set off their Celiac or gluten intolerance or whatever - just maybe that is because that trigger set off a cascade of events due to an enzyme depletion and the enzyme depletion left the body unable to cope in other areas.
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Ali - 50 - struggled with what I now know to be GI symptoms and poor carb digestion for at least 35 years! Diabetic type II (1997). Mother undx Celiac - lifelong diabetic Type 1 & anemic (plus 1 stillborn and 10 miscarriages after me). Father definitely very GI.

Stopped gluten & dairy, Jan 08, but still other issues so dropped most carbs and sugar and have been following the Specific Carb Diet (SCD) since March 08. Recovery slow but steady and I can now eat a much broader range of foods especially raw which are good for my digestion and boost my energy level.

Not getting better? Try the SCD - it might just change your life.........

#8 Felidae

 
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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:27 AM

This is a very helpful thread.

After years of being gluten-free, I seem to have developed some intolerances too. Luckily they are not as severe as a gluten reaction. But they are annoying and require immodium! I've possibly narrowed it down to soy or xanthan. It's such a pain. I was feeling good for years and this just sucks. Anyways as usual, people are posting great advice here. I guess I'll have to keep a food journal. I would love to try the SCD also, but I'm unfortunately living with my senior parents and sharing a small kitchen, etc. When I lived in my own house (with my husband) my kitchen was gluten-free, maybe that's part of the problem. I miss my kitchen. Oops, try to stay on topic!
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#9 coldnight

 
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Posted 19 March 2009 - 12:02 PM

Not to say misery loves company, I wish you all felt better, but I kind of felt like I was alone. Gluten kills me, I have no doubt about that. But a lot of other things are pretty miserable as well. I've been able to get off my medicine for weeks at a time, but one wrong thing and bam, sick again... not as sick as gluten sick, but sick for several days, requiring some medicine, although 1/30th of what I was taking on a daily basis before.

I think Mother of Jibril gives really good advice, and has helped me a lot thus far. Like when I was trying to add in some vegetables and kept getting sick, had no idea bell peppers were nightshades. It makes sense, tomato paste in gluten free bbq sauce does not bother me, raw tomato does. I think I'm just going to have to accept these limitations as long as I have them.

I hear you Thleensd, plain food is alright, but it's hard to remember all the stuff you can't eat. I'm not dx'ed, it may just be intolerance for me. You however know, so... one assumes you have intestinal damage? From what I have read, it may take 6mos to a year to repair. You may find you are not as intolerant after that, perhaps keep to the simple stuff for long enough, and give your body time to heal?

Meline is right, the best way to do it, for me this has worked alright so far, is just go very basic, get to a point you know is safe, and slowly add in foods, one at a time. This was the advice from my allergist, no allergies here either. Keep a journal of the food, as it helps. Hopefully you can build up a repertoire of things that do not bother you, and then you can try things later on.

I have found, for instance, I can tolerate gluten-free corn chips, in moderation. Some things I just can't eat every day. Salsa, is always bad for me, always. I have never eaten it and felt alright. I'm stupid though, and I keep trying it again. I should make my own tomato-less salsa or something. I think it just depends on your specific symptoms, I want a chart too. I want someone to tell me exactly everything I can eat that won't make me sick, but no one knows. It's just a process of trial and error.

I wouldn't suggest getting attached to any serious stomach calming medicines, because they have been rough for me to get off, but maybe something for the real bad times, imho, something that doesn't have ibuprofen, aspirin or tylenol. And maybe give your body a little time if you react badly to something after 3-4 days before you try something new. I think only a journal can help you do this. It's a horrendous pain... but I think a lot of us are feeling it with you.
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#10 coldnight

 
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Posted 19 March 2009 - 12:09 PM

I have been recovering on the SCD too and it has been very helpful for many of my previous health issues, most of which are either much improved or gone completely, however, I still have issues with my digestion and am coming round to the idea that it may be due to a lack of certain enzymes.

I suspect that has been the problem for a long time but it got to the point in the end where it just could hardly cope any more. Certainly carbs have been a problem for me for years and having now been doing some research on this I suspect that the damage that the 'bad food' has done to my body has somehow restricted its ability to produce enough of the relevant enzymes to enable my gut to digest carbs properly.


This sounds a lot like me. Rice is fine, sugar is fine... those carbs. Other carbs are not fine at all. I usually stick to meat and rice. Occasionally banana... corn chips as I said, on occasion, they will make me sick if I eat too many. As will most carbs. I would really like to find out if you find some place that sells amylase or whatever you get that you think helps. It seems like the complex carbs do not digest well at all. Meat is fine... seems to be one of the few things that doesn't bother me.

I like what you said about the way corn is farmed too, in Michael Pollan's book he talks quite a lot about the nutrients lacking in food, compared to say.. 60 years ago. He references something that says one apple from the 1940s is equivalent to 3 apples today in terms of vitamin content and such. Because everything is mass produced in the cheapest way, and very little is returned to the soil. That part resonates... I think it's possible, at least for me, that I have been damaged over a long period, suppressed it heavily with motility slowing agents, and probably should have went to a basic simple diet years ago, now it's hard to find anything that doesn't cause me some distress.

I tried betaine too, I don't think that's my problem, I had heartburn. =)
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