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Gf Vaginal Yeast Creams


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10 replies to this topic

#1 tammy

 
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Posted 21 February 2004 - 07:26 PM

Hi Ladies,

I did the research and contacted the company. K-Y personal lubricating jelly is sometimes wheat-free. Yes, they said sometimes it doesn't have wheat and sometimes it does. :huh:

Has anyone found a vaginal yeast cream, such as Monistat, that is gluten-free? Are the generic brands of vaginal creams gluten-free (Rite-Aid)??

It would be helpful, thanks!!

:blink: :huh: ;) :D :lol: :unsure:
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#2 Guest_Blackheartedwolf_*

 
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Posted 23 February 2004 - 06:36 PM

Um, I thought that you only need to have gluten-free products if there is some danger of them getting in your mouth and being ingested. (Like shampoo can get in your mouth when you are showering, and lipstick gets in the mouth.)

Why would KY jelly and Yeast cream need to be gluten-free? I mean, those are not things that would accidentally wind up in my mouth.

Do you have a skin allergy to it?
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#3 tammy

 
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Posted 23 February 2004 - 06:46 PM

Not according to my Doctor. Wheat containing skin products are not allowed either. Are you able to use all body lotions?
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#4 Guest_Blackheartedwolf_*

 
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Posted 23 February 2004 - 06:52 PM

I know you shouldn't use lotion near your face or on your hands if it has wheat in it, in case you put your fingers in your mouth or get the lotion on your lips.

I don't see how vaginal products would be part of that unless you have a skin allergy. It can't get in your small intestines through the vagina, after all.
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#5 lovegrov

 
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Posted 24 February 2004 - 10:40 AM

I'd like to say respectfully that the doctor in this post is wrong. You cannot absorb gluten through your skin or your vagina.
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#6 Guest_Blackheartedwolf_*

 
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Posted 25 February 2004 - 08:14 PM

Thank you, that is what I thought. :)
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#7 seeking_wholeness

 
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Posted 26 February 2004 - 08:28 AM

I have been wondering about something lately, but I haven't had time yet to research it: Has it been conclusively determined exactly WHERE gluten triggers the autoimmune reaction in celiacs? My thoughts are somewhat nebulous at the moment, but I am thinking that because the (supposedly) primary symptoms of celiac disease are intestinal, everyone assumes that the reaction STARTS and ENDS there. I am not completely convinced that this is true. Our immune system is present virtually everywhere in our body, so who is to say that the presence of gluten elsewhere in or on the body will NOT trigger a reaction, at least in some people? Also, even if the reaction does occur ONLY within the intestines, celiacs almost invariably have some degree of leaky gut syndrome--which I believe works BOTH WAYS! Not only to proteins in the intestines "escape" into the bloodstream, but substances from the bloodstream may also pass into the intestinal tract. Hence, if gluten has somehow found its way into the bloodstream without passing through the gastrointestinal tract, it MAY still be able to travel "backwards" through the gut wall and trigger a reaction at that time! Also, some substances CAN be absorbed through the skin (just consider all the "patch" products on the market today). Gluten may not be one of them (I don't know for sure), but even so, if your skin is even slightly damaged it would be theoretically possible for gluten to gain entry into your body, and potentially cause a reaction.

My personal opinion on gluten-free cosmetic and hygiene items is, "better safe than sorry"! I just get a BAD feeling when I consider putting gluten-containing products on my skin, and I am learning to trust my intuition regarding gluten--it has been right before!
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Sarah
gluten-free since November 1, 2003

#8 lovegrov

 
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Posted 26 February 2004 - 08:53 AM

I'm simply quoting all the top celiac experts I've ever read or heard, Fasano, Green, Rudert and others -- the gluten must be ingested and hit the intestines to cause the antibody reaction. And gluten molecules are too large to be absorbed through the skin. I tend to believe them.
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#9 kejohe

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 05:17 PM

I have to say, I think that Sarah has an extremely valid point. Just consider all the symptoms related to celiac disease that have no connection the the digestive system, like hair loss, acne, miscarriage, brain fog, bone loss etc., etc.

If her theory can be disproved then I would like to know how. Because in all the research I have done, I have never seen any information that guarantees that the immune response begins in the gut. All I have read is that ingestion is the more common because it is the easiest way to get gluten into the system. But again, no hard and fast facts have come to my attention, I tend to think the entire "skin absorption" issue has not been explored enough.

I'm not trying to be argumentative here, but I really would like some rock solid information, if anyone has anything to offer, I'd love to read it.
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Kathleen
Son has been gluten-free since December 2001

#10 tammy

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 05:19 PM

Thanks for the replys. This may make my life easier. ;)
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#11 tammy

 
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Posted 28 February 2004 - 08:32 PM

I see Sarah's point. I agree with the fact that anything that compromises my immune system is not worth using. Of course, how far does one wants to take this standard is completely a personal choice. Until I feel stronger or research proves otherwise, I prefer to be sensible but cautious.

Although I have never had any skin reactions to touching any subtance, I do have the most common symptoms of gluten sensitivity, bone loss, brain fog, acne etc. Currently, I am on the most amount of supplemental, and medicinal support in my life. This is a good thing but I thought I would feel like a champ! I don't, yet I feel 50% better than I did one and two years ago. So I am realizing the impact of this chronic genetic disease on a daily basis. However I am grateful for acidophilus, glutamic acid, aloe vera juice and other nutritional support that does produce healing.

Besh wishes to all!
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