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Can't Stop Binging On Gluten!


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48 replies to this topic

#1 Rachel Keating

 
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Posted 08 March 2009 - 09:47 PM

I've been diagnosed with celiac disease for almost 5 years and I've never stayed true to the diet. I immediately starting binging on gluten right when I got diagnosed with celiac disease... my excuse was "tomorrow I will start being gluten free and eating healthy so I can overeat today". Five years later and 100 pounds heavier, I'm completely done. I can't stop eating and am completely lazy. It's affected my social life, my school work, and everything else. I used to be up for anything and be so energetic, now I am self-conscious and afraid to go places because I am scared I will get sick. I have a gym membership but never go because I'm too depressed and have no motivation. I need help or some kind of boost to help me out. I don't know if anyone else has dealt with the situation of binge-eating on gluten because you have been told u can never eat it again but it's obviously a problem for me. I don't know what I'm looking for here, maybe some inspiration or knowing that I'm never alone? I'm only 20 years old and feel like this is so stupid I am already dealing with physical issues like possible diabetes. Thanks for reading :)
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#2 MollyBeth

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 01:09 AM

Rachel! Stop eating Gluten! You are going to kill yourself! The effects may not happen tomorrow or in five years or even ten...but eventually down the road it is likely that you will have long term problems develope from eating gluten. You have got to stop planning your future diet and start living cause guess what? Tomorrow is Today! It's will power that is going to get you through this and you have to make the decision to start living a healthier life. You will find this web site to be very helpful and supportive. I hope you decide to stop eating gluten today.
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Gluten Free 10/11/08
Negative Blood test 08/08
Positive Biopsy 10/08
No family members diagnosed...but Symtoms seem to be the same.
Father- Diverticulitis
Paternal Grandmother Died from Colon Cancer when she was 38.

If you're going through hell, keep going.
-Winston Churchill

#3 Roda

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 04:55 AM

You definately need to follow the diet and probably need labs to see if you have any deficiencies from damage done while you are eating gluten. You could try and find something else to focus on. There are a lot of support groups out there maybe you can find one and get some ideas on how to cope and eat. There are a lot of good things to eat and with a little planning you can make a lot of good food. I originally lost 10 lbs before being diagnosed and since gluten free I have gained it all back. I am appx 30 lbs overweight, so I am not starving by any means. :lol: I am treating some vitamin deficiencies now and gaing a lot more energy. I feel like I can start doing some exercise now to help burn off the extra pounds.
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Me:
Celiac disease(positive blood work/biopsy- 10/2008), gluten free oat intolerent, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis/Disease, Raynaud's Disease


DS2(age 9):
celiac disease(positive IgA tTG, no biopsy- 11/2010)


DS1(age 13):
repeated negative bloodwork and negative EGD/biopsy. Started on a gluten free trial(8/2011). He has decided to stay gluten free due to all of the improvements he has experienced on the diet.


#4 kmcr80

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 06:00 AM

I've fallen into that rut as well...the whole "I'm going to binge today and do better tomorrow" routine. It is a vicious cycle that you should take care of asap...it could have really detrimental long term effects.
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#5 teemaree

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 06:04 AM

Rachell, do you not feel pain after eating gluten?...........don't you get a foggy head?.. or headaches?
or stomach pains?... or bad gastric?
Cause I can assure you, if you keep on eating gluten, you will regret it, you will end up with all the above and maybe worst...
You don't want to put yourself through that do you?.........having to go through pain and agony and mind altering problems , even from a simple accidental glutening?................
It's hell............and I can promise you , you will not get a moments rest from it.....

Maybe it is easier for me to stay the hell away from gluten, because of all the damage and pain it has caused me..and continues to cause me, even looking at a picture of wheat gives me the heeby jeebeys.... I hate it, because of what it has done to me...IT IS POISON!..........

Maybe each time you grab for the gluten goodies.... picture it as a nail in your coffin?... not as yummy food... but as nails...placing you one step further to bigger problems.........
Please sweetie..........look at the posts here, the pain and agony so many endure..........Why do you want that for yourself?..........

And when you look at gluten free stuff.........just tell your mind that it tastes great , and there is worst things you could have to eat.....instead of yummy fruits and vegetables and meat!... it's crunchy full of goodness...
Please Rachell... be kind to yourself...........

I must say though, when my family sit there and eat all the things I once enjoyed, I do get a little jealous, but that soon disappears when I think about the pain it causes me...........just replace the want and need with the thoughts of most excruiating pain ............because that is what will happen if you eat gluten!
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#6 Judyin Philly

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 06:41 AM

Morning
Well, at 67 years old and un dx'd for 20 years.............I'd do anything to have know obese people could be celiac..........course at that time they'd never heard of celiac
I have a friend who has had 2 rounds with celiac related cancer...........
I pray your reconsider your decision.
Judy
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Judy in Southern CA

#7 luvs2eat

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 07:34 AM

You sure must not have the gastric issues I have when glutened. I can't IMAGINE eating gluten on purpose. When I was diagnosed, I sort of OD'd on the foods I COULD have cause I was so upset at all the foods I could no longer have... and gained about 30 lbs.
I'd only repeat what everyone else has said. Even if you don't have the immediate physical reactions to eating gluten... you're CERTAINLY doing damage to your body!

Maybe there's a gluten free organization if your local area? Meeting other peeps w/ Celiac might help a lot.
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luvs2eat
Living in the beautiful Ozark mountains in Arkansas
positive blood tests and later, positive biopsy
diagnosed 8/5/02, gluten-free (after lots of mistakes!) since that day
Dairy free since July 2010 and NOT happy about it!!

#8 sbj

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 07:51 AM

Rachel:

Please get your butt over to a meeting of Overeaters Anonymous.

https://www.oa.org/

One hour is not asking too much - please give it a try!
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#9 Mtndog

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 08:15 AM

Hey Rachel- I too was going to suggest you see someone. It might help you understand why you won't follow the diet.

If you're 20 years old and feel like that (no energy, motivation, depressed, weight gain and possible diabetes) it CLEARLY is affecting you!

Think of it as an addictive behavior- and you are certainly NOT alone in that. Please get help!
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***************************
Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.
Albert Careb


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#10 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 08:25 AM

Hi Rachel :)

I want to add that depression and anxiety are common symptoms of Celiac (I had/have both), and very possibly once you adhere to the gluten-free diet 100%, you may find that you will begin to have more motivation to stick to it.

Please, begin the diet in earnest now--get help if you need to. I wasn't diagnosed until I was 49, even though I had symptoms for well over 20 years. The sooner you go gluten-free, the less chance you have of developing related problems.

We're here to help.
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#11 Rachel Keating

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 11:45 AM

Thanks everyone, I had no idea that so many people would have responded so quickly, and it definitely makes me feel like I'm not alone. My sister has Celiac Disease too and she deals with it amazingly. I never had the immediate symptoms of eating gluten right away until just this year and it's been going on for a couple of months. I am definitely listening to what you guys said, even if it made me a little teary-eyed, because at 20 years old I guess I wasn't really thinking about the long-term affects of what I'm doing today. I'm sure 30 years from now I would have looked back and kicked myself in the butt. The whole cancer thing scared me to death, seeing as cancer already runs in my family. Thank you so much for all the support.... and the kick in the butt. :) I didn't realize how much that would help.
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#12 Takala

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 02:08 PM

One of the problems with this disease is that when it damages the lining of the intestines it also leads to nutrients not being absorbed properly by the body anymore, and the lack of those nutrients can make one act in ways that they wish they weren't. The cravings are quite "real," not imaginary and not a matter of willpower so much as eating the foods that don't do this and that work better for people who metabolize simple, easy to digest carbohydrates differently than the general population. You may also want to start taking a gluten free B complex multi vitamin, and a calcium and a magnesium supplement. I swear, based both on my research and personal experience, the B complex and the calcium and magnesium all interact and they will help kill these cravings. Doctors have now also said to increase the Vitamin D levels, also, because the previous RDA have been too low. (have been told this by my own doctor)

You've seen those skinny people who eat a lot of carbs and are hyper..... that's not us.

There's a subset of people, who get what is called "insulin resistance," and gain a lot of weight from yo- yoing back and forth on high carb starvation diets, that can do better on proteins, good fats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and maybe some dairy and some starchy vegetables and a little bit of grains, maybe. Their bodies convert extra sugars to fat on the body more easily. That could more likely you.

Some of the diets that tend to fight this reaction to carbohydrates are ones like the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, Atkins, South Beach, Zone, they tend to be the meat and veggies type diets with fat. And when I say fat, I mean things like Olive Oil and Avocados and Nuts, Coconut milk, real dark chocolate and oils, etc. This might not sound attractive at first, but it depends on how you cook with it. The fanciest, classic restaurants actually serve a lot of food like this. The problem with American cooking is that it tends to be a lot of gravy and breading and fried bread and fried grains. Atkins took a lot of criticism about his diet, especially the "intro phase", but the one thing you notice on one of these meat and veggie type routines is that when you eat fats, you don't get hungry, because fat is the slow burning fuel that lasts the longest.

Females also are (unfortunately) to fear "fat" in the diet and to eat lots of grains and carbohydrates by our culture, which is geared towards less exercise and much access to fast food that is full of sugars, corn syrups, and simple carbohydrates. When you eat simple carbs combined with fats and sugars, that is the fastest way to put on weight. Your blood sugar immediately spikes up, you feel sated for a little while, and then it crashes, and you feel like you MUST eat sugars or carbs like bread, immediately, to bring it back up again.

People don't even know to eat VEGETABLES these days, several servings a day, to help kill hunger pangs. And real fruit instead of junk. But if you eat too much fruit, the fructose levels can cause too much problems with the way calcium is regulated, which is why you also need magnesium to regulate this.

Another problem is when you gain a lot of extra weight in the form of body fat, you actually have to eat less to maintain it, and exercise less, than muscle weight. So it is not your imagination that you might be eating less than thinner people right now. This can change as you try to exercise a bit more as you start to feel better.
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#13 Rachel Keating

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 02:51 PM

I'm not going to lie, I'm a little freaked out by how perfectly u just described me haha I am on a prescription for Vitamin D from my doctor, and have been told that I have Metabolic Syndrome. Which is insulin-resistance. Wow. U summed me up to a T right there lol
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#14 Jamie

 
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Posted 09 March 2009 - 05:56 PM

You definately need to follow the diet and probably need labs to see if you have any deficiencies from damage done while you are eating gluten. You could try and find something else to focus on. There are a lot of support groups out there maybe you can find one and get some ideas on how to cope and eat. There are a lot of good things to eat and with a little planning you can make a lot of good food. I originally lost 10 lbs before being diagnosed and since gluten free I have gained it all back. I am appx 30 lbs overweight, so I am not starving by any means. :lol: I am treating some vitamin deficiencies now and gaing a lot more energy. I feel like I can start doing some exercise now to help burn off the extra pounds.



How did you gain that 30 lbs? Was it just simply from going gluten free and there was nothing you could do to stop it? I was just diagnosed today. I have hypothyroidism and I already have a very tough time keeping weight off. But I do...by excercising like a maniac and eating really healthy... all I need now is to gain more weight out of nowhere and not be able to do anything about it.
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Hypoglycemic -since 1993
Hypothyroid- since 2000
Celiac- since 3/10/09

#15 Nancym

 
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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:06 AM

How did you gain that 30 lbs? Was it just simply from going gluten free and there was nothing you could do to stop it? I was just diagnosed today. I have hypothyroidism and I already have a very tough time keeping weight off. But I do...by excercising like a maniac and eating really healthy... all I need now is to gain more weight out of nowhere and not be able to do anything about it.

Well first thing get your thyroid straightened out because losing weight when you're hypothyroid is dang near impossible. You can cut your calories/carbs drastically and maintain though.

Next I'd avoid the gluten free replacement products. They're worse than what they replace as far as starches and sugars. Concentrate on eating whole foods. Avoid starches and sugars. Eat non-starchy veggies, low sugar fruits like unsweetened berries, meat, fish, eggs, nuts. That should put the brakes on weight gain and when you get your thyroid issues worked out you should lose weight. Make sure you get plenty of protein and fat too. Protein and fat keep you full a loooong time and don't spike your blood sugar or make you over-secrete insulin like cereal or something starchy does. That just sets you up to be hungry in short order.
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