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Celiac Disease In The News
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113 posts in this topic

:(

Couldn't access these - and too many pop-ups on site - and political propaganda...

:):):)

BUT - thank you for looking out for so many UK stories!!!!!

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Sure :) . When you mentioned that one was from the UK (that I got through the Google alert for "gluten"), I made a new alert for any articles that have "coeliac" in it...since it's more commonly spelled that way in the UK...

I couldn't get one of them (the second) to open this time, but the first one:

What the big supermarkets said about availability of gluten-free products Jun 13 2005

Madeleine Brindley, Western Mail

 

Morrisons

A spokesperson said, "We offer a number of gluten-free products in our Free From range, which can be found in the majority of our stores.

"In order to help provide for our coeliac customers this range is designed specifically to help people who have allergies, one of which is a gluten allergy.

"These products are under various reputable brands from specialist suppliers and include bakery products and snacks such as cakes and biscuits.

"We also contribute a list of own label products to the Coeliac Society for inclusion in its information and a list containinga selection of our products is available for customers from the Head Office Customer Service Department or by request from their local store."

Tesco

A spokesperson said, "Many of our shoppers have special dietary needs, often caused by a food allergy or intolerance.

"That's why we introduced the Free From range, which has more than 150 everyday items, free from gluten, wheat or milk.

"Feedback tells us that this has made the shopping trip easier for thousands of customers."

Sainsbury's

A spokeswoman said, "Our Free From range consists of over 60 tempting sweet and savoury products which havebeen rigorously taste-tested and competitively priced, and is endorsed by Britain's leading charity for allergy sufferers.

"Our range features delicious products you couldn't find before, such as gluten-, wheat- and dairy-free fish fingers or toffee and walnut iced dessert, as well as everyday products like gluten- and wheat-free corn and rice fusillipasta.

"These products are set out in special Free From sections in stores, and Sainsbury's to You has dedicated a Free From aisle to make it even easier to find these products online."

Asda

Despite repeated requests, Asda was unavailable for comment.

and the second one:

What is coeliac disease? Jun 13 2005

Madeleine Brindley, Western Mail

 

COELIAC disease is a life-long inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract caused by gluten, a protein in wheat, and similar proteins in rye, barley and oats.

In a coeliac, gluten damages the lining of the small intestine which reduces the ability of the gut to absorb adequate nutrients from food.

Wasting can occur, leading to severe illness resembling malnutrition.

In the 1950s it was thought to be a childhood condition but now it is recognised that many more adults than children are diagnosed.

Coeliac symptoms can occur at any age and, according to Coeliac UK statistics, most coeliacs are diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 45.

Coeliac patients may be acutely and severely ill with weight loss, vomiting and diarrhoea or they may have chronic, but almost trivial symptoms, such as tiredness, lethargy and breathlessness, according to Coeliac UK.

Adults may have a history of abdominal or intestinal upsets, or they may suddenly develop the condition at any time.

A coeliac baby is usually fit and well until after the introduction of gluten-containing solids.

The only treatment necessary to return the intestine to normal is a strict gluten-free diet. Coeliac disease used to be a rare condition, but more and more doctors are beginning to recognise the disorder in their patients.

It is thought that one in 100 people in the UK has the condition, which runs in families.

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:D

Thanks celiac3270, must have been doing it wrong.

Coeliac UK are giving out the message more and more clearly in the last few months in my opinion :D

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