Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

What Else Can I Eliminate? I Still Don't Feel Better.


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#16 B R I A N A

B R I A N A

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:20 PM

If you're hypoglycemic, and eating a lot of potatoes and fruits, and no meats (and I didn't see mention of nuts in there).... well, you might want to reconsider eating meat. Eating a little throughout the day, if it's stuff that *YOUR* hypoglycemia reacts quickly to, will have you going up and down all day, never feeling good. Being gluten and dairy free, and hypoglycemic myself, I *can't* eliminate meat, because there is no way for me to get enough protein in each of my meals to keep my hypoglycemia at bay.

(Eating frequently is not the only/best way to control hypoglycemia - each meal needs to be balanced for fat/protein/carbs/fiber. From what I've read from people's experiences, everyone seems to have a different "ideal mix" for themselves. I seem to do best somewhere between 25%/25%/50% and 30%/30%/40%. If much more than 50% of my calories come from carbs, even fairly complex ones like beans, I do not feel my best. And using one single food - like soy - to substitute for this, generally just makes it worse.)



So you think eating meat might be my only like possible solution?
  • 0
B R I A N A

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 lonewolf

lonewolf

    Gluten Free pancakes over the fire!

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,877 posts

Posted 27 April 2009 - 02:52 PM

So you think eating meat might be my only like possible solution?


If you really don't want to eat meat, what about something like eggs? Are you committed to a vegan diet? Vegetarian might be easier - you could try goat or sheep milk cheeses to. Some people can handle those even if they can't do cow dairy.

I agree that soy could be your problem (it's horrible for me) and that you might not be getting enough protein. I was vegetarian (not vegan) for a while and got my protein from peanut butter, eggs, beans and cheese. I know you can't have dairy, so that really limits it.

Also, you might want to try hemp milk - it has more nutritional value than rice milk.
  • 0
Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

#18 tarnalberry

tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts

Posted 27 April 2009 - 04:29 PM

So you think eating meat might be my only like possible solution?


Only? Not necessarily, but I'd suggest that you not behold yourself to veganism at the expense of figuring out your health. As lonewolf says, perhaps try starting with eggs and dairy. See if that works. Look into a wider range of food sources (hemp milk/seeds, flax seeds, nuts, etc.). Scour vegetarian websites and recipe books and get creative to figure out where you can bump your variety and protein/fat. But don't leave meat off the table if that doesn't work. You have to figure out what works for *YOUR* body, and no one can really tell you what that is. Hypoglycemia manifests differently for different people. (I can eat bananas - but I like to eat them fairly underripe, just past green - and some people can't eat them at all. Gotta figure out YOU. For me, eggs two days in a row will not work for breakfast, especially if not *well* balanced with carbs - just doesn't sit well with me and give me *enough* carbs for the blood sugar to get up from the nighttime low.)
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#19 B R I A N A

B R I A N A

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 06 May 2009 - 12:06 PM

I'm allergic to the dairy, so I couldn't have the goat milk or the cheese.
I don't think I can go back to eating just eggs or meat again, I sorta just like grossed myself out by it. Even some of the substitutes that taste almost real gross me out cause it reminds me of eating flesh. You know?
I've never had I'm sorry but I forgot what the milk was called that you had mentioned, so maybe I will try and find that.
I'm not looking at soy for protein, I just eat it alot with most of my meals.
Soy butter, tofu, milk for cereals, so I just need to find something to replace that.
I am trying to cut back on my soy intake as much as I can.
For instance I don't just drink chocolate soy milk anymore I just stick with water.
  • 0
B R I A N A

#20 Zachnap

Zachnap

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 14 posts

Posted 06 May 2009 - 03:28 PM

I know what your problem is. It is Oxalates - you need to reduce the oxalates in your diet. Spinach, (Red) tomatoes, oranges, Potatoes, Soy, Chocolate and fruit juices are very high in oxalates. I can't eat ketchup but I can eat small amounts of orange tomatoes(lower oxalate content than red tomatoes). Read here about high oxalate content in Spinach

I have a frequent need to go pee about every hour or so, which causes lack of sleep due to having to get up a couple times a night. I do actually urinate about ninety percent of the time but sometimes its only about a tablespoon or so. I don't drink VERY often but when I seem to have just a cup of water it seems to almost go right through me like ten minutes later, I go.

Because of inflammation in your urinary tract due to oxalate crystals (check out link) and oxalate in your blood-stream due to separation of tight junctions of small intestine. You should notice that once you eliminate oxalates you will be able to "go" much easier and completely empty your bladder. Drink lots of water. Once you figure out which foods contain too much oxalate for you, you can take Ibuprofen (make sure you don't have a problem with it) occasionally to reduce intermittent inflammation and help you "go". Don't just start popping Ibuprofen everyday, it is not good for you.

I was taking Caltrate calcium supplements, until the doctor told me about two months ago I have crystals in my urine, so I was on bicitra hoping to make a difference and it made none.

These are probably oxalate crystals - stop taking Bicitra (pills just mask problems they don't fix them) and Bicitra will not prevent oxalates from entering into your blood stream throw tight junctions in the small intestine - stop going to that doctor, he doesn't know what he is doing and should lose his ability to write prescriptions until he figures out how to be a real doctor - doctors are supposed to treat the root cause of symptoms not the symptoms themselves. Continue to take calcium some how. People whose bodies can't break-down oxalates or produce too much oxalate are at high risk for kidney stones and long-term damage to kidneys etc.

Bloating is a problem, most of the time after I eat my stomach blows up.

Me too, when I eat high oxalate foods.

Under my left breast I get this like stabbing pain almost like a knife were going through me and all I want to do is lay down.

Yes, me too, when I eat high oxalate foods - these pains and burning are caused by "indigestion", "heart burn". Do you ever get mild acid reflux?

I'm a fruits and veggie fanatic, they're a big portion of what I eat.

You aren't going to be able to eat these like you have been until you are healed - most vegetables have medium to high oxalate content.

It is very difficult to eliminate Gluten, Dairy and oxalates - you won't be able to eat much of anything except rice and meat and a few fruits and vegetables. If you limit your oxalate intake you might be able to eat small amounts of potatoes here and there.

I believe though that the oxalate problem should only be temporary until your small intestine has healed but it may take a while or never - I'm not sure yet. You might be able to slowly begin eating them after some time. I think that what happens is that the tight junctions in your small intestine open which allow oxalates to pass through without being broken down. They can get into your bloodstream and cause inflammation etc. in various parts of your body. Typically most people have a special bacteria which breaks these oxalates down but damage to the intestine can kill-off the cultures in your stomach.
  • 0

#21 GFinDC

GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,111 posts

Posted 06 May 2009 - 04:23 PM

Hi Brianna,

Since you mentioned you get pain in your stomach area after eating, I wonder if it might be H. Pylori? H.Pylori can cause ulcers, but it is treatable. Just a thought.

Another thing to look into is goitrogenic foods. If your thyroid levels are low, you might want to avoid foods that are considered goitrogenic, or thyroid hormone lowering. I think spinach is one of them actually. Living on spinach was great for Popeye, but may not be wonderful for people with borderline thyroid function.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogen

Goitrogens are substances that suppress the function of the thyroid gland by interfering with iodine uptake, which can, as a result, cause an enlargement of the thyroid, i.e., a goitre.

Did you know soy is considered a goitrogen also? Anyhow, the list of goitrogenic foods is pretty long. There are also foods that promote thyroid function, like avocados and coconut.
  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#22 LadyBugLuv

LadyBugLuv

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 23 posts

Posted 07 May 2009 - 08:20 AM

I am going to make a suggestion that will likely make you shudder but.....How much soy are you consuming? It is not uncommon for some of us to also be intolerant to soy and unfortunately it seems to be in almost as much as gluten is.


Yeah, I agree... soy seems to actually make me feel worse than gluten...
I get incredibly nauseous from it (even the soy lecithin in chocolate, sad to say)...
and I did test positive for an intolerance to gluten and soy.
funny thing is, as a baby, I was on soy formula because I couldn't have the dairy kind... go figure.
and like gluten, soy is in everything.... gotta love vegetable oil and soy lecithin ;).
good luck.
  • 0

#23 caramckelvey

caramckelvey

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 10 May 2009 - 04:51 AM

I think corn could be the culprit or at least it is for many people. Think about how much corn we have in the American diet, almost everything processed has either corn or wheat (corn syrup, corn as a starch, etc., carmel color). I agree, the best thing is probably eliminate everything and then slowly add different food groups. Good luck!
  • 0

#24 emcmaster

emcmaster

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 607 posts

Posted 10 May 2009 - 08:07 AM

Someone might have mentioned this already, but try eliminating corn. My corn intolerance showed up about a year after going gluten-free.
  • 0
ELIZABETH

gluten-free (04.17.2006)
corn-free (03.27.2007)
xanthan gum-free

#25 hurrican_drea@yahoo.com

hurrican_drea@yahoo.com

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 12 May 2009 - 01:12 PM

I have had to become a strict vegan in the USA and will not eat ANY preservatives. I did not see you list anything about eatine organic. I must eat completely organic I react to pesticides on fruits and vegetables etc. I also use organic shampoos, makeup, lotions. I will even have reactions to dish soaps as they leave residues on my plates etc. I joke with my friends that I am the canary in their mine. Best of luck. I suggest an elimination diet. start with one food only and slowly add other foods.

I agree with what otheres have said about both corn and soy I do ok with these but know many celiacs who don't. Although I do avoid soy because of my thyroid troubles and history of breast cancer
Drea
  • 0

#26 B R I A N A

B R I A N A

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 25 May 2009 - 02:19 PM

So I don't mean to be like a downer and I mean this as just not a bad way.
But like the oxalate diet I was looking into it and soy is a high oxalate and I eat a lot of soy, not because I think it's healthier but because I'm a vegan. Peanuts also they were saying is a high oxalate food, and I eat them for protein.
I don't mean to sound complicating or anything, I really appreciate the feed back. I just... don't know what I'll eat for the time I am watching my oxalate intake. You know?
I don't know why, but like when I stopped eating gluten, I didnt mind, it was easy same with dairy and not eating meat. Just... I'm not sure.
The constant urination, is definately annoying. If anything I'd like to fix that.
  • 0
B R I A N A

#27 B R I A N A

B R I A N A

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 25 May 2009 - 02:21 PM

So I don't mean to be like a downer and I mean this as just not a bad way.
But like the oxalate diet I was looking into it and soy is a high oxalate and I eat a lot of soy, not because I think it's healthier but because I'm a vegan. Peanuts also they were saying is a high oxalate food, and I eat them for protein.
I don't mean to sound complicating or anything, I really appreciate the feed back. I just... don't know what I'll eat for the time I am watching my oxalate intake. You know?
I don't know why, but like when I stopped eating gluten, I didnt mind, it was easy same with dairy and not eating meat. Just... I'm not sure.
The constant urination, is definately annoying. If anything I'd like to fix that.
  • 0
B R I A N A

#28 Zachnap

Zachnap

    New Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • Pip
  • 14 posts

Posted 30 May 2009 - 05:50 PM

^Well, I am very certain that your problem is with oxalates - almost 100% from what you have said. In fact, I think that many of the people here who are claiming problems from corn and soy are actually problems with oxalates. I though the same for a while until I figured it out.

You say you are a vegan - that is fine, I don't want to tell you that there is something wrong with that. But, you don't have to be a vegan. You can continue to eat foods which are causing chronic problems for your body at the moment like soy and the others or I'll post some stuff that you should be able to eat. Maybe you can just eat some meat here and there for now - I don't know your reasons for being a vegan but...

Low-Oxalate Diet
Low Oxalate Foods
Recipes/Food Lists - Low Oxalates

So, I guess dairy is out too right? Can you get by with going just vegetarian for now or do they not eat dairy either? I mean not all animals are raised on factory farms - there are organic farms and such. Just imagine if plants, animals and people all had the same rights - we could only eat rocks. Sucks to think about that. Just having fun, forget that, I know you are serious about not eating animal stuff.

But essentially there are some vegetables(some lettuce (romaine, iceberg I think), cauliflower, broccoli, I've been okay with small amounts of orange/yellow tomatoes), herbs and a couple nuts and beans (black-eyed peas, split peas and mung beans). Now, once you get your daily oxalate content down, you can get away with small amounts of Medium Oxalate foods but it might be possible for you to eat Low and Medium now - it just depends on you. I seem to be very sensitive to oxalates at the moment but those symptoms we talked about are gone 75% of the day now only occurring when I eat to much of something with medium content. Again, you might only be unable to eat foods high in oxalate, find some stuff of low to medium content and swap them out for soy. See if that helps. Eat Black-eyed peas and split peas instead of peanuts for Protein and Flax seed for folate. You'll need some B12 and Vit D since you aren't eating meat and dairy. See what happens. Just try it for a couple weeks.

They are working on a probiotic containing Oxalobacter Formigenes (think I spelled that right) which is a natural bacteria that breaks down oxalates and present in the digestive tracts of most people. Things like Celiac can destroy the bacteria cultures in the intestine which could be one of the reasons why you and I have problems with these foods. This probiotic will help re-culture the intestine.

Ultimately, what you do is your decision. Eat some stuff that you may not want to at the moment(such as meats/dairy) and eliminate soy/peanuts, continue taking anti-inflammatory meds which may cause severe problems down the road or just deal with the pain. Did you say you were taking calcium supplements? Continue to take that as it locks up oxalic acid (oxalates) into calcium oxalate before it can enter the blood-stream. Just drink lots of water to flush that out.
  • 0

#29 shirleyujest

shirleyujest

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 109 posts

Posted 02 June 2009 - 05:36 AM

Have you been tested for bladder infection and/or kidney infection? Just an idea. I would definitely drink more water, 8 glasses/day and don't forget extra salt cuz the water w/o salt is not good either. Someone here correct me but think we need 1/3 tsp. salt daily and when you cut out all processed food you don't get enough unless you add it.

In my case I have very low blood pressure and get light-headed w/o making a point of adding salt to food or eating salted nuts.

There's a ton of nuts and nut butters out there so you don't have to eat peanuts for protein. I eat a alot of almonds and almond butter, plus chopped walnuts, sprinkle them on my gluten-free waffles.

Also I'm inclined toward one of the other posters who suggested adding a little meat or at least eggs to your diet. Healthy people can get sufficient protein being vegan but you have enough health problems and are so limited in foods it may be that you are one who needs small amounts of meat. If you're concerned about how animals are treated you can buy free-range eggs pretty much everywhere now; organic meats are also widely available. I don't want to disrespect your choice though, if you have a strong conviction about eating vegan then I'm sure you'll find your way.
  • 0
SUJ

..............
dx fibromyalgia '02
dx lupus '03
dx raynauds '05
but luckily i'm much more than my disease(s)!
may '09: tested neg. for celiac but have extremity numbness, ataxia, headaches etc. -- in other words enough reason to go gluten free to test my response

#30 yttap

yttap

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 04 June 2009 - 04:09 PM

[quote name='songstressc' date='Apr 25 2009, 01:56 PM' post='528475']
I am shocked! If Rice Dream contains gluten for sure then that is where I have been glutoned from 2 weeks ago! I have wracked my brain trying to figure out where. For sure gluten ? Why?
[/quote
=============

why do you use rice milk if you re concerned about the gluten?? I use almond and goat milk. I use the Pacific brand of almond milk (from Trader Joes) but I think Whole Foods has it too. It doesn't have all the crap in it like the other brands. Just because you are watching the gluten/wheat-- doesn't mean you can't be sensative or allergic to other stuff like MSG or regular table salt. I use only sea salt.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: