Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Chocolate Processed With Alkali
0

12 posts in this topic

what do you know about chocolate alkali? Is it safe? When I first went gluten free and researched it some old information said ketchup, vanilla, some alcohol wasn't safe... is this the same for chocolate alkali? That perhaps it was thought not to be safe - but is it? I've been known to eat my fair share of it and never had a problem, but some just told me today it's not gluten free, so I'm very curious.

Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


First off, alkali is not alcohol. Even if it was, the alcohol would be evaporated. Some think some alcohol products made from grains could present a gluten problem. Same for some grain vinegars. I'm not one of them.

Secondly, chocolate processed with alkali is called dutch chocolate. The alkali, a base chemical, removes some of the acidity, makes it more water soluble, and gives the chocolate milder properties. I've always preferred it for chocolate milk. I'm no chemist, but I don't see why this would give the chocolate gluten ingredients.

Anyone?

best regards, lm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are most chocolate safe? What should I be looking for to make sure it is gluten free? Thanks for sharing your tricks.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are most chocolate safe? What should I be looking for to make sure it is gluten free? Thanks for sharing your tricks.

Whether the ingredients list wheat, barley, or rye. It's really that simple. There are no tricks. :rolleyes:

best regards, lm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've come across barley malt in some lindt truffles before. The bag was an assortment, and it didn't look like all the flavors contained the barley malt, but it's something to look out for.

I didn't eat any of them, just because I wasn't sure.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are actually a lot of things to consider. This goes for all food, not just chocolzte. I thought barley, wheat and rye were the only things to look for, but there are a lot of derivatives of those things that aren't lzbeled as derived from wheat, rye or barley. If it has modified food starch and doesn't specify that it's from corn, it may be from wheat (or potato). Malted barley syrup, malt, barley malt, dextrose, wheat dextrose (in quite a bit of chocolate products), soy sauce, seitan, some chocolate is sweetened with grains, so you have to ask. Imitation meat or imitation seafood is often a problem, gravy, salad dressing, artificial flavors are sometimes derived from gluten-containing grains and don't specify what they are. Ice cream often has gluten products in it. There's probably more, but i've exhausted my brain of ideas for now.

Whether the ingredients list wheat, barley, or rye. It's really that simple. There are no tricks. :rolleyes:

best regards, lm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are actually a lot of things to consider. This goes for all food, not just chocolzte. I thought barley, wheat and rye were the only things to look for, but there are a lot of derivatives of those things that aren't lzbeled as derived from wheat, rye or barley. If it has modified food starch and doesn't specify that it's from corn, it may be from wheat (or potato). Malted barley syrup, malt, barley malt, dextrose, wheat dextrose (in quite a bit of chocolate products), soy sauce, seitan, some chocolate is sweetened with grains, so you have to ask. Imitation meat or imitation seafood is often a problem, gravy, salad dressing, artificial flavors are sometimes derived from gluten-containing grains and don't specify what they are. Ice cream often has gluten products in it. There's probably more, but i've exhausted my brain of ideas for now.

There is very little fact in that post. You are working from very out-of-date material. Wheat must be clearly disclosed. Rye doesn't hide (never did). Chocolate which is sweetened with barley malt will say so in the ingredients list.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are no nasty surprises in chocolate, thank heavens. As others mentioned Lindt truffles have barley malt, and in most chocolate with "krispies" the crisp rice has barley malt in it. It will be clearly listed in the ingredients.

Occasionally you'll see a label warning "made on shared equipment with wheat". It's so easy to find chocolate without any wheat warning at all, like Ghirardelli, that I skip those brands.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lindt and Godiva are pretty clear that they are not gluten free. Dagoba and Scharffenberger are gluten free. Lecithin can be wheat-derive but usually the manufacturer will label the source. Guittard is gluten free also.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have NEVER seen wheat-derived lecithin and I've been reading labels for seven years.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also as far as the Lindt brand is concerned they have many plain chocolate bars, if not most of them, that have no gluten ingredients. My children and I get the 90% cocoa bars about once a month as a treat and for the bit of iron that is in dark chocolate.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0