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All My Make-up, Shampoo, And Lotion Has Gluten!


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35 replies to this topic

#16 Gemini

 
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Posted 10 June 2009 - 01:53 PM

For the person who said the Lady was incorrect about using products that contained wheat, you are the one that is wrong....
I have had celiac since 2002. Anytime that I put any type of product on my body that contains wheat, barley, rye, and gluten I break out.. Including the top of my head when I use shampoos that are contaminated. IT really depends on what type of celiac you have and how severe your reactions are.
My brother too has celiac. His at first was just the bowel problems but now it is becoming the skin problems too.
Mine was the skinl,dermatitis herpatiforms, now it is becoming the bowel,.......


No, my information is correct. If a person has a topical reaction from touching gluten, that's an allergy, not a Celiac reaction. There are no "types" of Celiac as far as that is concerned. For a Celiac reaction to occur, you MUST ingest a product internally. This is what triggers the autoimmune system to react.

You really ought to read the book I mentioned so you can educate yourself further on Celiac Disease. Many Celiacs also have wheat allergies to boot so that would explain your reaction.
I'm sure you have the reaction you say you do but that would fall into the allergy category.

I was diagnosed at end stage of celiac disease and was deathly ill. After recovery, I can touch a wheat product with zero problems. Different story if I ingest it. I do not screen anything topical for gluten, except lip and mouth products and my blood work is right where it should be. If gluten were absorbed through the skin, I'd be back in the hospital by now. It's really important that people learn how this disease works so they can make informed decisions based on medical fact and not give erroneous information to someone new to this. If someone wants to eliminate gluten topically, that's perfectly fine but any reaction they are having is not a Celiac reaction, unless they eat the product.
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#17 ravenwoodglass

 
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Posted 10 June 2009 - 02:33 PM

No, my information is correct. If a person has a topical reaction from touching gluten, that's an allergy, not a Celiac reaction. There are no "types" of Celiac as far as that is concerned. For a Celiac reaction to occur, you MUST ingest a product internally. This is what triggers the autoimmune system to react.

You really ought to read the book I mentioned so you can educate yourself further on Celiac Disease. Many Celiacs also have wheat allergies to boot so that would explain your reaction.
I'm sure you have the reaction you say you do but that would fall into the allergy category.

I was diagnosed at end stage of celiac disease and was deathly ill. After recovery, I can touch a wheat product with zero problems. Different story if I ingest it. I do not screen anything topical for gluten, except lip and mouth products and my blood work is right where it should be. If gluten were absorbed through the skin, I'd be back in the hospital by now. It's really important that people learn how this disease works so they can make informed decisions based on medical fact and not give erroneous information to someone new to this. If someone wants to eliminate gluten topically, that's perfectly fine but any reaction they are having is not a Celiac reaction, unless they eat the product.



People can of course have an allergy as well as celiac. A reaction that is solely on the skin would likely be an allergy as you have stated. However it is also possiible to injest enough gluten with toiletries to cause a autoimmune or celiac related issues. This could occur when shampooing or if you are using gluten lotions the residue on your hands could be enough to start the antibody reaction. IMHO it is best to be overcautious in the beginning and then once a person has healed they can add back in stuff that might be riskier to that person. I am glad you are doing well with gluten derived toiletries but not everyone will. Even the experts are learning more every day and stuff that they think is safe now may not be considered safe once more research is done. This can be seen in the newer definition of gluten free for labeling purposes in food. Not long ago the standard was 200ppm was safe. That has now been lowered to 20ppm. Quite a difference.
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Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#18 sylviaann

 
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Posted 10 June 2009 - 03:13 PM

No, my information is correct. If a person has a topical reaction from touching gluten, that's an allergy, not a Celiac reaction. There are no "types" of Celiac as far as that is concerned. For a Celiac reaction to occur, you MUST ingest a product internally. This is what triggers the autoimmune system to react.

You really ought to read the book I mentioned so you can educate yourself further on Celiac Disease. Many Celiacs also have wheat allergies to boot so that would explain your reaction.
I'm sure you have the reaction you say you do but that would fall into the allergy category.

I was diagnosed at end stage of celiac disease and was deathly ill. After recovery, I can touch a wheat product with zero problems. Different story if I ingest it. I do not screen anything topical for gluten, except lip and mouth products and my blood work is right where it should be. If gluten were absorbed through the skin, I'd be back in the hospital by now. It's really important that people learn how this disease works so they can make informed decisions based on medical fact and not give erroneous information to someone new to this. If someone wants to eliminate gluten topically, that's perfectly fine but any reaction they are having is not a Celiac reaction, unless they eat the product.


I respect your opinion..every celiac and gluten sensitive person reacts differently. In my experience and in my Celiac Specialist's experience (she lectures all over the country), she believes that topical products can,,and have caused reactions with many of her patients.
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#19 luciddream928

 
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Posted 10 June 2009 - 05:26 PM

Hi, I'm new to the forum and I need major help. Even after eating gluten free, I was still feeling very ill. I just found out that not only does what I put in my body need to be gluten free, but also what I put on it. I did find out that Bare Minerals make up is gluten free (correct me if I'm wrong) so I'm covered on make up now. Here is a list of products that I need. I would really appreciate it if someone could give me some recommendations.

Acne facewash
Volume shampoo
conditioner
body wash
lotion
mouse
hair spray

Any help would be appreciated :)


Shampoo/Conditioner - I buy Matrix Biolage and Trader Joe's brand ("Replenish"?)
Lotion - Gold Bond, Unilever (an umbrella company - look on the back),
Lotion - Seven Palms is great (just bought Lavender/Relax kind in a blue bottle at Smith's grocery store)
Mouse/Hair Spray - (Aussie? Not sure but I've heard people mention it here)
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gluten-free since Aug. '08

Went gluten-free after high fat score results from Enterolab (291).
No celiac gene but two DQ1 genes.
Scope tests both normal, biopsies for celiac and Crohn's normal (on gluten-free diet).

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1    0301   
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2    0502   
Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ   3,1  (Subtype 7,5)

#20 Lisa16

 
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Posted 11 June 2009 - 04:40 AM

Here are some non-supermarket brands to try (all but burt's bees) available from Sephora, the Skin store or otherwise online:

Acne facewash: korres, caudalie, ecco bella, 100% pure, LUSH (coal face and fresh pharma esp,) burt's bees, sundari-- ditto these for moisturizers

Volume shampoo and conditioner: phyto, Lush (big), rene furterer, korres (conditioner only, ) burt's bees

Body wash: korres (check label), LUSH, burt's bees

Lotion: 100% pure, LUSH, korres (very nice!), burt's bees, caudalie, sundari

Mousse and hairspray: phyto (hairspray, leave-in conditioner, etc.), furterer-- try LUSH and korres (yucca soft shine wax) for mousse alternatives

I have found that LUSH and korres (though expensive) have great lines with a number of safe products.

Good luck. As always, check the labels. There are other lists on this site if you do a search.

Also know that this topic (as you can tell from the posts) represents a kind of schism in the celiac community between those who believe you don't have to worry about it and those who feel just as strongly that you do. There have been some fights here.

I come down on the "be very careful about it" side because I know anything I put outside my body can end up inside. I sing in the shower!
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#21 Gemini

 
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Posted 11 June 2009 - 11:29 AM

People can of course have an allergy as well as celiac. A reaction that is solely on the skin would likely be an allergy as you have stated. However it is also possiible to injest enough gluten with toiletries to cause a autoimmune or celiac related issues. This could occur when shampooing or if you are using gluten lotions the residue on your hands could be enough to start the antibody reaction. IMHO it is best to be overcautious in the beginning and then once a person has healed they can add back in stuff that might be riskier to that person. I am glad you are doing well with gluten derived toiletries but not everyone will. Even the experts are learning more every day and stuff that they think is safe now may not be considered safe once more research is done. This can be seen in the newer definition of gluten free for labeling purposes in food. Not long ago the standard was 200ppm was safe. That has now been lowered to 20ppm. Quite a difference.



I do agree with your statements as you defined them correctly. Yes, a person can have a reaction if they swallow enough shampoo but I personally am at a loss over this one. The smallest, tiniest amount of shampoo will be noticed, taste-wise in the mouth. Even if a person was not a Celiac or GS, who would voluntarily swallow shampoo all the time? I would be sick from that alone, never mind a Celiac reaction. The only reason a person would have a problem from toiletries is by swallowing them routinely so I guess if someone feels they cannot accomplish this, they will choose to go entirely gluten-free. Not a problem. I just have a problem with people giving erroneous information, especially to newbies. Unless you are not a young adult or adult, it shouldn't be too hard to not ingest products.

As far as the "learning more everyday" mantra is concerned, I think this in not new science. It's easy to establish whether a product will or will not be absorbed into the skin to the point where it reaches the GI tract. This is done all the time with meds. I also believe, from what I have read and questioned the AMA on personally, that they know at what point, in PPM's, a person will have villi blunting and damage. They may not have a cure other than the gluten-free diet or be good at diagnosis yet but the disease process is well understood. What it really takes for this diet to be successful with anyone is learning about the disease process itself along with the diet aspect.

I have no problems with anyone choosing to go completely gluten-free, for whatever reasons they may have. However, it is wrong and incorrect for someone to give out information to a new Celiac that gluten can be absorbed through the skin and you have to go entirely gluten-free. Ask any Celiac expert in the medical field and they will tell you the same. At some point you have to include information from the experts because you cannot make decisions based on what someone said on the internet that's been proven otherwise. I am in the science field myself so maybe this flavors how I look at research and the information that's available.
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#22 sylviaann

 
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Posted 11 June 2009 - 12:55 PM

I do agree with your statements as you defined them correctly. Yes, a person can have a reaction if they swallow enough shampoo but I personally am at a loss over this one. The smallest, tiniest amount of shampoo will be noticed, taste-wise in the mouth. Even if a person was not a Celiac or GS, who would voluntarily swallow shampoo all the time? I would be sick from that alone, never mind a Celiac reaction. The only reason a person would have a problem from toiletries is by swallowing them routinely so I guess if someone feels they cannot accomplish this, they will choose to go entirely gluten-free. Not a problem. I just have a problem with people giving erroneous information, especially to newbies. Unless you are not a young adult or adult, it shouldn't be too hard to not ingest products.

As far as the "learning more everyday" mantra is concerned, I think this in not new science. It's easy to establish whether a product will or will not be absorbed into the skin to the point where it reaches the GI tract. This is done all the time with meds. I also believe, from what I have read and questioned the AMA on personally, that they know at what point, in PPM's, a person will have villi blunting and damage. They may not have a cure other than the gluten-free diet or be good at diagnosis yet but the disease process is well understood. What it really takes for this diet to be successful with anyone is learning about the disease process itself along with the diet aspect.

I have no problems with anyone choosing to go completely gluten-free, for whatever reasons they may have. However, it is wrong and incorrect for someone to give out information to a new Celiac that gluten can be absorbed through the skin and you have to go entirely gluten-free. Ask any Celiac expert in the medical field and they will tell you the same. At some point you have to include information from the experts because you cannot make decisions based on what someone said on the internet that's been proven otherwise. I am in the science field myself so maybe this flavors how I look at research and the information that's available.



Fyi...You do not have to have full blown Celiac Disease to suffer from the effects of ingesting or using topical products containing gluten. Many patients who are gluten sensitive suffer symptoms that are worse that Celiacs...but without the villous atrophy. At the recent GIG Conference held in Seattle, Dr. Peter Green said that he has changed his mind and, yes, gluten sensitivity without Celiac Disease (without villous atrophy) is real. He previously did not believe in gluten sensitivity. I am living proof of this as I suffer from neuro symptoms if I ingest a drop of gluten. I have myoclonus for several days and nights at sleep onset from ingesting or applying a cosmetic product topically (i.e. my husband rubbed my head with a towel after using a hair conditioner containing gluten). I had periodic limb movement all night, causing extreme insomnia from this. My celiac specialist diagnosed me with secondary myoclonus caused by gluten ingestion.

Siesta Key :)
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#23 Mountaineer Josh

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 06:07 AM

http://www.mayoclini...disease/AN01623
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Positive Biopsy - February 2006
Positive Bloodwork - December 2005

#24 sylviaann

 
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Posted 15 June 2009 - 05:17 AM

http://www.mayoclini...disease/AN01623

Fyi..that info on skin absorption (Cosmetic products is outdated). Althought the Mayo Clinic is well respected, they only speciialize in treating selected health conditions. They are not known for their expertise in Gluten sensitivity or Celiac Disease.

Sylviaann
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#25 Lisa16

 
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Posted 15 June 2009 - 06:55 AM

If you look at the original post, you will see that it is from a person who is requesting a list of gluten-free products to try in the hopes that she will feel better. This is a reasonable request.

It seems to me that this person has made an informed decision to try going gluten free in all areas of her life. She was not asking for anybody to weigh in on the debate. She was asking for concrete information about gluten-free products.

We can go back and forth ad infinitum here (and it has been done before,) but we should honor the original request. I see only two lists with the information she requested here.

People who feel the need to "police" this issue ( as well as a few other issues) and pass out "correct information" (that may not be correct at all) would do well to stop for a nanosecond and consider their true motivation. Why do you care if somebody decides to use a gluten free shampoo? She is not foisting her beliefs on others nor is she telling new people they must do this. She simply wants to know which ones are gluten-free. This is the right place to ask that question. And no erroneous information regarding her request was given.

If I were a new poster and I got this kind of response to my thread, I would be both oddly fascinated and disturbed.

I forgot to say that many of the juice beauty and juice organic products are gluten-free as well.

Good luck and welcome to the original poster. I bet you didn't think you were stepping into a hornet's nest, eh?
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#26 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 15 June 2009 - 06:59 AM

Very well said Lisa, thank you :)

I'm currently using Goldwell Color Shampoo and Conditioner that I found at Ulta.
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#27 KPanther

 
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Posted 15 July 2009 - 03:21 PM

I'd like to share the fruits of my research. I just spent the better part of the last week calling companies and corresponding with them via email to find out if their products are gluten/soy free. Since I can not have gluten AND soy, these items listed below are free of both. I hope this helps others in the forum!

Deodorant - Johnson's and Johnson's (specifically the cucumber melon scent) baby powder (gluten-free SF) - I use this instead of deodorant and it works fantastically. I can't find a nice-smelling gluten-free SF deodorant that received good reviews on Amazon/drugstore.com.

Mouthwash - Act cinnamon (gluten-free SF)

Shampoo - Gluten Free Savonneire Shampoo; California Baby Tea Tree & Lavender; Rene Furterer Naturia Gentle Balancing Shampoo, Rene Furterer Asteria Soothing Shampoo (all gluten-free SF)

Conditioner - Desert Essence Lemon Tea Tree & Desert Essence Fragrance Free; Gluten Free Savonneire Conditioner; California Baby Super Sensitive Conditioner; Rene Furterer Fioravanti Shine Enhancing Detangling Cream Rinse (all gluten-free SF)

Facial Wash - Aubrey Organics Vegecol (for sensitive skin); Avene Cleanance AC; Avene Cleanance Soap-Free Gel Cleanser; Avene Gentle Cleanser for Intolerant Skin (all gluten-free SF)

Facial Moisturizer - Avene Cleanance Oil-Control lotion; Avene Cream for Intolerant Skin; Avene Soothing Eye Cream (all gluten-free SF)

Body Moisturizer - Gluten Free Savonneire Lotion (gluten-free SF)

Lip Gloss - Afterglow Organic Hydra Lip Gloss (gluten-free SF)

Body Wash - Whole Foods 365 Value Grapefruit scented shower gel (gluten-free SF)

Hand Soap - Gluten Free Savonneire has several kinds that are gluten-free SF (gluten-free SF)

Makeup - Bare Escentuals Foundation, All-over color (Warmth, Bare Radiance), Mineral Veil, Eye liner & shadow. All are gluten-free SF.

The specific items I am sharing above were the ones that I am interested in....meaning...I have both sensitive AND oily skin. So I looked for a facial moisturizer meant for oil control - but the face cleansers are for my sensitive skin. I'm sure many of the companies I called have other products that are SF gluten-free for dry skin, normal skin, etc....but I didn't investigate those since I don't need that type of product.

Now, here are some UNSAFE items, or companies that were totally UNHELPFUL in my quest to find out if items were gluten-free and SF:

UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED BELOW UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED BELOW UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED BELOW UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED BELOW
Germ-X hand sanitizer (unsafe....and company was rude)

Neutrogena moisturizers (body and facial....unsafe...and company was rude)

Estee Lauder (foundation, lip gloss, moisturizers...everything I checked on! But the company was helpful and kind...I'll miss Estee Lauder.)

Aveda (all items I checked on were unsafe....and company gave me the runaround by just forwarding an ingredient list to me even though I had one in front of me....I needed to press them for info on ingredients "derived from" wheat/soy, etc) No more Aveda for me.

Udder Cream (soy filled, but gluten free)

Ban deodorant (the reason why I switched to baby powder) - company was unhelpful and gave me the "we can't control what our vendors add to ingredients they supply us with" line of bull. So...a vendor could supply them with a "fragrance" that also had a touch of rat piss added? And they can't tell the consumer that??

Giovanni shampoo/conditioner (soy filled)

Clinique All About Eyes (eye cream) - gluten filled, but soy free

UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED ABOVE UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED ABOVE UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED ABOVE UNSAFE ITEMS LISTED ABOVE
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HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac)
HLA-DQB1*0602 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,1 (subtype 8,6)
Gluten-free since July 2007
Celiac (lab confirmation in January 2009)
Soy intolerant/allergic (lab confirmation on 2/11/09)
Soy-free since 2/11/09

#28 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 15 July 2009 - 05:33 PM

This is truly a hot topic. It doesn't matter what anyone else thinks, it only matters how you feel, and what you think. I know I am gluten intolerant, much more reactive than many are. There is an acceptable level of 20ppm to justify saying a product is gluten free. Some of us cannot tolerate 20ppm, nor 10ppm, or even 5ppm. All grains cause a reaction in me. Just as gluten ON my body causes a reaction, most grains on my body cause a reaction. Gluten in a lotion or soap, burns my skin...within seconds of touching my skin with gluten, I feel the burn. I used Tresemme Shampoo to wash my car, knowing it contained gluten and not using for my hair, I didn't even think about reacting to it when washing the car...I broke out in hives. Oats make me itch, exactly the opposite of what we have always been told about oats, it's suppose to be soothing. So, I know I can't use products with gluten or other grains.

I use Pantene Shampoo and Conditioner, Garnier Nutresse is ok, Softsoap for the shower and handwashing, Dove Body Lotion, Sauve Hairspray..I still use Gleem toothpaste, which many do not even remember, and have to buy it off the internet, no longer available in the stores, Garnier Hair Color, and some of the Bath & Body works lotions and body sprays are safe, Johnsons Baby Powder, Dr. Bronner's Peppermint Soap, Lady Bug Blessings Peppermint Oil Lotion....there is a lot out there that we can use. It's a personal choice to give up gluten containing products for our bodies.
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Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#29 still tiredofdoctors!

 
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Posted 15 July 2009 - 05:58 PM

KPanther --

Thank you for a GREAT list! That is fantastic.

I don't know about soy-free, but my kids' friend (my kids are grown . . . ) started selling Arbonne. She got a list of gluten-free products for me -- I'd be happy to share it -- and I can give you her email address, if you'd like it.

With regard to Estee Lauder? YIKES. They own an INCREDIBLE amount of cosmetic companies: MAC, Clinique, Philsophy, Origins (I think), Jane (available in drug stores, etc.) . . . I'll have to think about the others. When I called them years ago, they were incredibly rude, as well. Also -- evidently Neutrogena hasn't changed their customer service attitude! When I called them years ago, I was told -- in a VERY snippy voice, "You need to ASSUME that all of our products contain gluten." Assume? Let me tell you how tempting that one was . . .

Thanks again for a great list.

Darlin Deb: I agree. My dermatologist INSISTED that gluten on my skin could NOT cause a reaction. Perhaps he would like to explain why any time I use something with gluten I get these really AWFUL lesions on whatever area I used it . . . He rolled his eyes -- and I asked him to tell me why I was bleeding at all these spots . . . he never did give me an answer. Thanks for your input, too! Where do you get the Lady Bug Blessings peppermint lotion?

Oh -- also, I found this out: while Bare Essentials is gluten-free, RARE Essentials -- the one you can wear at night -- ISN'T!! Also, I think it is "L'Orac" (?) I don't know - it was outrageously expensive at Sephora - is NOT gluten-free!

I have found that our local Sephora is fantastic about checking on gluten-free status for me. THEY actually call the company rep while I'm there . . . and will either say, "It is DEFINITELY gluten-free" or they have even said, "I didn't like the answer I got . . . sounded questionable -- don't buy it!" It's been a really good experience shopping there.
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Lynne Previously "tiredofdoctors!!!", but I had SO much difficulty retrieving a lost password
Diagnosed with "Sprue-Related Ataxia" January 2005; Gluten-Free Lifestyle since August 2005 (Denial ain't just a river in Egypt)
To see additional diagnoses and what predisposed me to the seroconversin to celiac vs. gluten interolerant, view "About Me" page
"If you have to choose between being right and being kind . . . pick kind. Wayne Dyer, PhD

#30 KPanther

 
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Posted 16 July 2009 - 04:03 AM

Hi -
I totally forgot to add some hair styling products to my "safe" list that I posted yesterday. To "still tiredofdoctors!" - thank you for the offer to put me in touch with your friend (the one who sells Arbonne). I think I'll be set now since I found a lot of safe alternatives for my body care/beauty products.

Here are some additions to my SAFE list. These items are gluten free AND soy free:

Hair styling products: Rene FurtererAnti-Dehydrating Vegetal Styling Spritz (good for wet hair while blow-drying it); Rene FurtererStyling Wax Sheer Shine (great for thicker hair with flyaways - use on dry hair to add texture); Rene Furterer Finishing Spray (hair spray - I believe this is good for all hair types); Rene Furterer Styling Paste (good for NON-thick/course hair. I spoke with an educator at Rene Furterer, and he told me to use the Wax Sheer Shine instead of paste. With my hair - thick, coarse, flyaways - the Paste was not for me!! The Rene Furterer Styling Paste is gluten-free/SF.) You can find Rene Furterer on drugstore.com/beauty.com

Lip balm: Gluten Free Savonnerie lip balm (http://www.gfsoap.com/)

Rene Furterer was AWESOME and so helpful. When I called their toll-free number for assistance, they gave me the name and phone number of one of their educators to speak with. I called him and it was his cell number. He was literally traveling for business when I was on the phone with him - yet he patiently helped me find safe products. He knew exactly what was in each product (off the top of his head) - incredible!!! Rene Furterer's sister company is Avene - they make facial care products. I highly recommend both companies (Avene facial care, and Rene Furterer hair care). Both companies were so helpful and were dedicated to standing behind the safety of their products, and they ensured their customer (me) received the product information needed in order to make an educated decision. You can find Avene on drugstore.com.

I have a call in to Kiehl's (http://www.kiehls.co...home/index.aspx) to check on their lip gloss. Their team of experts are checking on the product's soy/gluten content. Same with Matrix regarding their Proforma hair spray. Once I have updates on those two products, I'll add it to the forum here.
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HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac)
HLA-DQB1*0602 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,1 (subtype 8,6)
Gluten-free since July 2007
Celiac (lab confirmation in January 2009)
Soy intolerant/allergic (lab confirmation on 2/11/09)
Soy-free since 2/11/09




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