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Legumes A Problem Now?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 samcarter

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 04:32 AM

So after going gluten free, it became clear that my "mild" food allergies (bananas, apples and green beans) were intensified. I cut those out. Then I noticed I'd get a rash when I drank soy milk, so I stopped using that.

Now it seems that any legumes--baked beans (which were gluten free, I checked), peanut butter---are causing the same kind of effect gluten once had on me. UGH. Basically horrible gas, and diarrhea in the morning after eating them. Literally, they go right through me, just like green beans used to.

Not that I mind particularly, but it seems the longer I'm gluten free, while I feel great, the more foods I have to eliminate to KEEP feeling great. Gluten, dairy, bananas, apples, green beans, soy, peanut butter.

Is it possible to develop a legume allergy after having a green bean allergy, since they're in the same family?

And when will this food elimination stop? I feel like the protagonist in Margaret Atwood's "The Edible Woman" where food after food was rejected by her body, unti she was eating nothing. Gah.
  • 0
Negative EMA test 8/08
Gluten free 8/08
Positive response to dietary change
Dairy free 3/09
Citrus free 5/09
Allergies: bananas, apples, green beans, mold.

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#2 jerseyangel

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 05:12 AM

If I'm any indication....it's possible :D

I uncovered/developed (?) an intolerance to legumes after going gluten-free. I noticed pretty quickly that peanuts and other beans didn't agree with me anymore, but it took a while for it to dawn on me that green beans were actually legumes, too. I felt much better after cutting those out, since I ate a lot of them.

I've tried legumes again on 2 different occasions--both times I got terrible nausea and stomach pain similar to food poisoning. Much worse than my gluten reaction.

There was a sports doctor who used to post here. I asked him about this and he said that it's not uncommon for people with autoimmune disorders to be sensitive to legumes.
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#3 Gfresh404

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 05:43 AM

So after going gluten free, it became clear that my "mild" food allergies (bananas, apples and green beans) were intensified. I cut those out. Then I noticed I'd get a rash when I drank soy milk, so I stopped using that.

Now it seems that any legumes--baked beans (which were gluten free, I checked), peanut butter---are causing the same kind of effect gluten once had on me. UGH. Basically horrible gas, and diarrhea in the morning after eating them. Literally, they go right through me, just like green beans used to.

Not that I mind particularly, but it seems the longer I'm gluten free, while I feel great, the more foods I have to eliminate to KEEP feeling great. Gluten, dairy, bananas, apples, green beans, soy, peanut butter.

Is it possible to develop a legume allergy after having a green bean allergy, since they're in the same family?

And when will this food elimination stop? I feel like the protagonist in Margaret Atwood's "The Edible Woman" where food after food was rejected by her body, unti she was eating nothing. Gah.


How long have you been gluten-free?

I would attribute the issues you are having with legumes to their high fat (peanuts) and high fiber (beans) content. Nearly all digestion of fats occurs within the small intestine. So it makes sense that you are going to have issues digesting them. Fiber is also very rough on the system; they don't call it roughage for nothing.

Like I said I doubt you developed another allergy.

I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes no foods seem to agree with me at all. I don't necessarily take out all foods that bother me. If I did, I'd be screwed. What you have to do is just take out the foods that bother you the most. I personally have nearly cut out all insoluble fibers. And when I do eat them, I take it easy on the fats for a couple of days because they really seem to throw off my digestion of fats. I also try to take it easy on all fibers, insoluble or not because they can still irritate the GI tract. Have you noticed that all the foods you have problems with are relatively high in fiber?

You don't necessarily have to cut out all the foods that cause you issues. Just eat them very sparingly. Everything in moderation, except for the gluten of course ;)
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#4 samcarter

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 05:56 AM

How long have you been gluten-free?

I would attribute the issues you are having with legumes to their high fat (peanuts) and high fiber (beans) content. Nearly all digestion of fats occurs within the small intestine. So it makes sense that you are going to have issues digesting them. Fiber is also very rough on the system; they don't call it roughage for nothing.

Like I said I doubt you developed another allergy.

I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes no foods seem to agree with me at all. I don't necessarily take out all foods that bother me. If I did, I'd be screwed. What you have to do is just take out the foods that bother you the most. I personally have nearly cut out all insoluble fibers. And when I do eat them, I take it easy on the fats for a couple of days because they really seem to throw off my digestion of fats. I also try to take it easy on all fibers, insoluble or not because they can still irritate the GI tract. Have you noticed that all the foods you have problems with are relatively high in fiber?

You don't necessarily have to cut out all the foods that cause you issues. Just eat them very sparingly. Everything in moderation, except for the gluten of course ;)


I've been gluten free for nearly a year. I can eat other high fiber foods (berries, other fruits, high-fiber gluten-free crackers, raw broccoli) with no issues. I kind of suspect the beans because, as I said, they pretty much go right through me. Green beans give me horrible intestinal cramps; the other legumes don't, but they have the same effect.
  • 0
Negative EMA test 8/08
Gluten free 8/08
Positive response to dietary change
Dairy free 3/09
Citrus free 5/09
Allergies: bananas, apples, green beans, mold.

#5 Gfresh404

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 03:43 AM

I've been gluten free for nearly a year. I can eat other high fiber foods (berries, other fruits, high-fiber gluten-free crackers, raw broccoli) with no issues. I kind of suspect the beans because, as I said, they pretty much go right through me. Green beans give me horrible intestinal cramps; the other legumes don't, but they have the same effect.


What do you usually eat with the beans and green beans?
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#6 samcarter

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 06:54 AM

What do you usually eat with the beans and green beans?


The last time I had green beans I just had them lightly steamed with a bit of butter. I tolerate butter fine with other foods. The last time I had any other kinds of beans, I think it was Bush's Baked Beans. And the last time i had peanut butter it was a tablespoon with a few gluten-free pretzels and some dried fruit.

Every time I had those--beans, that is--they literally passed right through me without being digested.
  • 0
Negative EMA test 8/08
Gluten free 8/08
Positive response to dietary change
Dairy free 3/09
Citrus free 5/09
Allergies: bananas, apples, green beans, mold.

#7 jerseyangel

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 07:59 AM

Sounds like you may have an intolerance to legumes--it's not uncommon, there are others here, besides me, who share the situation.

You could test it out by omitting all legumes for a week or so, and then reintroducing them, one at a time, about 4 days apart. That's a modified elimination diet, and the best way to determine your intolerances.
  • 0
Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev


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