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Sugar Free?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 MySuicidalTurtle

 
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Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:26 PM

My Mom's GI told her to try being dairy and sugar-free. The dairy-free is no problem since she is used to me and my future sister-in-law being dairy-free, but this whole sugar-free thing is new to her and to us!

What should she look out for sugar-wise?

What can she have to replace sugar?

Is Agave okay for her?

Thanks to anyone who can offer us some advice and help!
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#2 AliB

 
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Posted 12 June 2009 - 04:57 PM

Um, my take on sugar free means, well, sugar-free, the same as dairy free means no dairy?

Sugar is a big trigger for some people. Did the GI not give any information??

The only possibility that may help is Stevia. You can usually get it from a Health Store. It is very sweet but does not work in the body the same way as sugar so you don't need much. It can leave a bit of an aftertaste depending on the brand/type but some don't mind it.

Honey and Agave can be ok if you are not dealing with SIBO or Candida. Personally I would steer clear of chemical sweeteners, especially Aspartame, horrible stuff. They just add more toxic burdens to the body as it tries to deal with them.

Most Candida-type diets are sugar-free. They rely on savory foods rather than sweet. Sweet is habit-forming. It's surprising how quickly you can get used to not having it when you don't consume it for a while - like dropping sugar from your tea and how disgusting it tastes with it. After following the SCD for the last year or so, very sweet things are too much now for my palate to cope with and I am happy with unsweetened fresh fruit if I fancy a little sweet something.
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Ali - 50 - struggled with what I now know to be GI symptoms and poor carb digestion for at least 35 years! Diabetic type II (1997). Mother undx Celiac - lifelong diabetic Type 1 & anemic (plus 1 stillborn and 10 miscarriages after me). Father definitely very GI.

Stopped gluten & dairy, Jan 08, but still other issues so dropped most carbs and sugar and have been following the Specific Carb Diet (SCD) since March 08. Recovery slow but steady and I can now eat a much broader range of foods especially raw which are good for my digestion and boost my energy level.

Not getting better? Try the SCD - it might just change your life.........

#3 MySuicidalTurtle

 
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Posted 13 June 2009 - 02:55 PM

Thanks for your reply. She doesn't want to add chemicals, either. The GI gave her no information that I am aware of.

What I meant by what should she look out for sugar-wise is hidden sugars. I don't know if it is like gluten, where you have to look for many different names.
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#4 Juliebove

 
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Posted 13 June 2009 - 03:45 PM

To be on a truly sugar free diet, one must not consume any form of carbs whatever, because carbs convert to sugar in the diet. That means no grains, no fruits, no vegetables. Even nuts contain some carbs. That leaves meats and fats. Hardly doable for any length of time.

It could be that what the Dr. means is not to eat anything with what we know as the white powdery stuff in it. But this is pretty meaningless if you live in the US because HFCS has replaced sugar in so many foods. Your mom should really ask the Dr. what he means by this. He could mean not to eat any sweet foods. If so, that would include fruits, juices and even agave.
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#5 missy'smom

 
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Posted 13 June 2009 - 06:13 PM

You are right. There are many different names for sugars that appear on labels. I did a quick search and this is just one source that will give you some. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar
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Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11
Son: ADHD '06,
neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07
ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08
ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08
Gluten-free-Feb. '09
other food allergies

#6 AliB

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 05:56 AM

Oh right! Sorry, didn't get your point first off.

Absolutely they can be hidden in all sorts of forms but things like corn syrup is by far one of the worst culprits - usually labelled as things like dextrose.

Fancy telling your Mom to try sugar-free and then not explaining what he/she meant by it? Duh.

Personally, I would interpret it to mean anything processed. Not having the 'white stuff' would be pretty obvious, but avoiding processed foods would ensure that none is consumed 'accidentally'.

If it is for Candida, or because her body is intolerant to sugar then the less she has the better.

I have to avoid sugar but the diet does allow, if sugar intolerance and Candida is not an issue, a little honey or agave and a bit of fruit. I definitely tolerate those sugars without any problems, but sugar in other forms can be an issue for me.

The sugars in fruit and vegetables are mono-saccharides which means they are absorbed straight into the bloodstream, unlike carbs, starches and other sugars which are di or poly-saccharides and need to be broken down first. Damaged guts cannot always break them down efficiently enough and that is when they become a food-fest for rogue bacteria and yeasts, which can contribute to gas and bloating.
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Ali - 50 - struggled with what I now know to be GI symptoms and poor carb digestion for at least 35 years! Diabetic type II (1997). Mother undx Celiac - lifelong diabetic Type 1 & anemic (plus 1 stillborn and 10 miscarriages after me). Father definitely very GI.

Stopped gluten & dairy, Jan 08, but still other issues so dropped most carbs and sugar and have been following the Specific Carb Diet (SCD) since March 08. Recovery slow but steady and I can now eat a much broader range of foods especially raw which are good for my digestion and boost my energy level.

Not getting better? Try the SCD - it might just change your life.........

#7 MySuicidalTurtle

 
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Posted 14 June 2009 - 08:50 AM

You guys are so helpful! I told my Mom what you all have said. She is to avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup, regular sugar, sweets, candy, etc. Fruit and carbs are fine.

She has been dairy and sugar-free since the 12th and already is feeling better! She told me today that her bloating is almost gone and she can fit in her clothes, again. I am so pleased it is working for her! Hopefully she keeps getting better and better.


Thanks for all your replies.
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