Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

I Am Also Having Problems With Gluten Free Chex
0

52 posts in this topic

Could it be possible a product isn't gluten free after announcing it as such? :angry: It's not the milk I'm sure of that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

my first thought is that could you possibly be intolerant of other things too? I have discovered I am intolerant of rice also and thats an alternative that is usually used when making something gluten-free.

My only other thought is that perhaps they don't do all the cleaning that's necessary to be "certifiably" gluten-free between their making of the gluten-free cereals and their other products? I know some people can tolerate that kind of cross-contamination and others can't. I can't. Just an idea. You might call and ask what their procedure is to guarantee its kept seperate from the other products.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could it be possible a product isn't gluten free after announcing it as such? :angry:

I *still* haven't seen the gluten-free cinn here, even tho the plain rice chex were here from the beginning, I think.

Read a box yesterday.

Soooooooo .. ..I gotta ask - for all I know someone else picked it up for you - any chance it was pre-gluten-free box?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be the cinnamon flavoring. I used to have trouble with cinnamon life but not the regular before going gluten free. I have not had an issue however with the cinnamon chex.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've had several boxes without any problem. I doubt cc is a problem, they've put too much into this gluten-free line too be lazy about something like that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I already mentioned in the other post that the cinnamon one does bother me. Its the milk powder, I am very dairy sensitive. Soy lecithin is an ingredient as well. Not every reaction necessarily means gluten.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been pretty lucky that my local Wal-mart carries gluten-free Rice, Honey Nut, Corn and Cinnamon Chex. BUT...I had an experience of my own with that.

I bought a box of Honey Nut Chex that had the gluten-free designation on the front. Ate half the box, no problem. Had a bowl one morning, prepared as I always do with fruit on the top and the same brand and type of milk as usual. As I was eating, I noticed 2 slightly smaller and darker appearing Chex in the bowl. It brought me up short and I hemmed and hawed around about eating them and/or finishing the bowl. Eventually, I figured they were nothing more than over-browned, over-cooked Honey Nut Chex and that I was just getting paranoid about nothing.

Yeah, wish I had THAT one to do over. Just those 2 little Chex glutened the crap out of me and I felt horrible for 4 or 5 days. The next time I went to the grocery store I made it a point to look at the box of Wheat Chex and compare what had been in my bowl with the photo on the front. Yahtzee! We had an exact match. How just those 2 got in my box of Honey Nut Chex is anybody's guess, but they were there, alright.

I've bought another box since then and have done just fine, but I will tell you that I look at each and EVERY spoonful to make certain I don't find any more stray Wheat Chex lurking there. There are times that I wish people and manufacturers could experience, just once, what it is that we go through when we get glutened. I'd hazzard a bet they'd be a H

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I THINK I had a problem with the Cinnamon Chex, but am not 100% sure that was what it was. A Wegman's just opened up here and I've been trying out a lot of new "gluten-free" stuff. I LOVE the Cinnamon ones to eat for a snack just plain, but for now will stop. The Chocolate ones are also on my shelf now (my Hubby bought them for me as a surprise), and I'm reluctant because they, too, are flavored. In any case, my reaction wasn't severe, so I suspect it might have been just a bit of cross contamination - which I can normally tolerate.

I have no problem with the Honey Nut, Corn, and Rice ones though.

Hopefully some of us are telling General Mills so they can investigate if they have any training, cleaning or ingredients problems.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put me down for having a problem with the Cinnamon. I can't say I was glutened because my reactions are usually long and bad, but I definitely felt some gut pain for a few hours. I tried a little a couple of days later and felt the same. I've had no probs with the Rice or Honey Nut.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could be the whole grains.

I still have slight issues with any type of insoluble fiber, although I have gotten a lot better.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it can't be related to cinammon because I've had some desserts containing it and I didn't experience any problem. Today I still feel bad and my feces are a mess again. I really take care of the food I'm eating so I know it is not a cross contamination on my side.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was having problems with the cinnamon one too. Today I went to the store and decided to look at the ingredients list again. Barley malt. My freakin grocery store put them in the gluten free section even though these are apparently STILL the pre-gluten-free ones. I am ashamed to admit that I cried. Aaaaaaaaaaargh.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up a box of the cinnamon ones just the other day - both the Cinnamon AND Chocolate had barley malt in them. I put them right back on the shelf.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I picked up a box of the cinnamon ones just the other day - both the Cinnamon AND Chocolate had barley malt in them. I put them right back on the shelf.

Ugh. I didn't see barley malt in the strawberry, but can we assume the "mixed tocopherols" are safe?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The new version packages have the words "Gluten-Free" in big letters on the front. If you don't see that, then you have the older version. I understand both are on store shelves.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't remember which one i saw but one of the gluten-free ones has peanut flour in it

Judy

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sigh. Are there any good, reasonably inexpensive, reasonably healthy cereals out there? I'm not into Kix and coco puffs and that kind of thing (cinnamon Chex is about as far down that path as I'll go) but I can't afford EnviroKids all the time either.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to know thier manufacturing process too.....as for us, we aren't buying any more. My dd was acting glutened for weeks, and I could not figure it out. I finally just quit buying Chex all together, even the Rice Chex that I thought she was fine with at first.

She has been her old self again, it's so nice to have my sweet little girl back! I do think it was the Chex, it was the only thing I cut out of our diet, and I waited forever to do it b/c I thought for sure that couldn't the culprit. She is now eating other whole grains just fine, which I originally thought was the problem instead of the cereal itself. So, I don't hink you are crazy for thinking it's the Chex!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought they said that they had dedicated lines and a room just for the gluten-free cereals b/c that's what the people wrote and said they wanted

I'll try to find the article i read.

found this article just now but guess it didn't address the cc issue

does anyone know if they wrote this somewhere else?

shoot........know i read it some where.

[Social Media Allows Giants to Exploit Niche Markets

General Mills No Longer Needs Huge Budgets to Talk to Specific Segments

By Emily Bryson York

Published: July 13, 2009

CHICAGO (AdAge.com) -- The package-goods model has always been a no-brainer: Create a mass-appeal product; distribute it nationally; stoke demand with big-budget, shotgun-style advertising to spray the widest possible market; and hope sales hit the magical $100 million first-year benchmark.

HOT TOPIC: News of product spread fast.

But in this age of personalized web pages, super-sophisticated direct marketing and social-media tools that allow like-minded consumers to share and promote products, that traditional model is evolving at major marketers like General Mills. The $14.7 billion package-goods giant is now offering gluten-free baking products aimed at the 2% of the population with Celiac disease (which is characterized by an intolerance to gluten), and the additional 10% interested in avoiding gluten -- a niche the industry would once have dismissed as too small to target profitably.

"The classic new-product-development model was all around finding costs to pay for TV advertising," said Ann Simonds, General Mills' president-baking. But while TV is still the best way to generate mass trial and awareness, it's "not the only way anymore." Especially to reach consumers who require gluten-free foods, who are, of necessity, savvy social networkers.

But it's not just 88-year-old Betty Crocker adopting a more forward-thinking marketing recipe when it comes to package foods. Supermarket Guru Phil Lempert said the major industry players aren't just looking to develop billion-dollar brands anymore. "Just like fragmentation of TV viewing, we're seeing the same thing on supermarket shelves," he said. "It's not just about coming up with a product and selling a $1 billion or $100 million. They have to carve out these niches that very own-able and brand reliant." He added that package-food companies have grown increasingly responsive to consumer requests, removing high-fructose corn syrup, antibiotics and growth hormones whenever it makes financial sense.

Moreover, in many cases, package-goods players are developing their own niche products rather than relying on the old model of waiting to see if an upstart niche brand will be successful and then snatching it up, much like Coca-Cola did when it purchased the now-mass Vitaminwater. "For a while, the larger companies said, 'We'll let someone else do it, and then buy them if they're any good,'" said Bill Bishop, chairman of consulting group Willard Bishop. "Now it's become evident that you give up too much in opportunity by letting it get developed by the smaller players."

More variety

But what about the second key ingredient to product success, mass distribution? After all, gluten-free products would appear to run counter to the trend of retailers decreasing their product assortment counts 15% or more. But Mr. Bishop said stores are really shedding duplication, such as dozens of kinds of olive oil, and that frees up room for new products that target a need.

"What we're finding is the stores aren't really getting smaller; the retailers are saying, 'We're going to take the No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 brands and our store brands, and that's it,'" Mr. Lempert said. "So there's more shelf space available than a year ago, and it allows for more [varieties] of the No. 1, No. 2 and probably No. 3 brands and store brands."

In the past year, gluten-free baking products became the most consumer-requested item at General Mills, a fact Ms. Simonds said was partly gleaned from social media as the company has more and deeper conversations with consumers. What was once a call to the consumer hot line or a two-paragraph letter is now an in-depth conversation about feelings and need states.

"The combination of talking to our own employees who have this challenge and the consumer requests we've been receiving -- the number there were, their depth and the passion -- was really compelling," Ms. Simonds said. "The fact that it happens to be a niche or smaller group of people than we traditionally serve didn't faze us, because we have this vehicle in the internet that allows us to reach those folks."

General Mills launched a gluten-free version of Chex cereal last year, and gluten-free Betty Crocker baking mixes hit the shelves last month. The platform is launching with mixes for chocolate-chip cookies, brownies, devil's food cake and yellow cake.

Passionate interest

Dena Larson, marketing manager-baking products at General Mills, said while consumers with Celiac disease are a small percentage of the population, they are well-connected. She said rumors that General Mills was developing gluten-free baking products spread across Twitter like wildfire.

Since the audience was already clamoring for gluten-free news, General Mills knew consumers would carry the message. "We felt that this was a product that was going to be marketed almost entirely digitally," said Kelli Ask, interactive-marketing manager at General Mills. "We knew this was a group of very passionate consumers, always talking to each other and looking for solutions."

The company has partnered with the major Celiac disease foundations, and invested in search-engine optimization. That's a logical move, since Ms. Ask said once a person gets a Celiac diagnosis, "the first thing they do is turn to the search engine to figure out what they can eat." And when they do, "We want them to enter 'gluten-free' or 'Celiac' and be directed to our website."

Advertizing Age Mag.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gluten free doesn't mean absolutely no gluten. It just means under some certain amount. Soon to be set at 20 ppm, I think. Some of us might be sensitive to smaller amounts. That might have something to do with why the gluten free amount is set to under 5 ppm in Australia and New Zealand.

When I ate rice chex I seemed to get a gluten reaction too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have ate two boxes of the honey nut gluten free without a problem. My reaction is pretty obvious too that is distinctive to gluten. I havent tried the cinnamon yet as we dont eat milk.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rotate between the rice, corn, and honey nut every morning now for months. Have also had the strawberry, chocolate, and cinnamon. Haven't had any problems with any of 'em.

best regards, lm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When this topic of problems with the Cinnamon Chex posted I thought to myself, "well, they don't bother me". But then I got to thinking I'd only eaten the Rice and Honey Nut gluten-free cereal.

So last week, being out of cereal, I pull out the Cinnamon Chex that said gluten free across the front. I've eaten it three different times within the last week. Once in early morning, once late afternoon and now today about 30 minutes ago.

I can hardly keep my eyes open. I was fine when I got up this morning, filled with energy and ready to go. Have had great sleep habits for several weeks. I figured it was a good time to check the chex.

All three time I've become overly tired when eating the Cinnamon Chex. Next I'll make something with cinnamon, probably Crock-pot pumpkin pudding to see if it's the cinnamon making me tired. This is the recipe I use. I just substitute my gluten free flour for the Bisquick. I've never noticed before getting this tired after eating cinnamon.

http://myallrecipes.wordpress.com/2008/10/...umpkin-pudding/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When this topic of problems with the Cinnamon Chex posted I thought to myself, "well, they don't bother me". But then I got to thinking I'd only eaten the Rice and Honey Nut gluten-free cereal.

So last week, being out of cereal, I pull out the Cinnamon Chex that said gluten free across the front. I've eaten it three different times within the last week. Once in early morning, once late afternoon and now today about 30 minutes ago.

I can hardly keep my eyes open. I was fine when I got up this morning, filled with energy and ready to go. Have had great sleep habits for several weeks. I figured it was a good time to check the chex.

All three time I've become overly tired when eating the Cinnamon Chex. Next I'll make something with cinnamon, probably Crock-pot pumpkin pudding to see if it's the cinnamon making me tired. This is the recipe I use. I just substitute my gluten free flour for the Bisquick. I've never noticed before getting this tired after eating cinnamon.

http://myallrecipes.wordpress.com/2008/10/...umpkin-pudding/

mmm the pumpkin pudding sounds really good. Can I use soy instead of the milk? I eat pumpkin in the morning for breakfast hehehe

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,642
    • Total Posts
      921,566
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hello I'm happy to join, any help is greatly appreciated as it can be difficult by times for sure. Unfortunately, I have been told my doctor has definitely not been doing anything correctly and very backwards about Alot of things. I live in canada, and there are celiac support groups I have found but I am about 2 hours away from any. I live in a pretty rural area. Although,  I have still received some help from them , they prefer a diagnosis before helping out to much. My doctor has me on a waiting list to see a gastrointestinal specialist but whenever I called her office to inquire about an appointment time I was told there was a very long wait and that I was considered to be a non emergency. So I am waiting to get an appointment. I have seen a dermatoligist for some of my rashes and she said it was dermatitis and gave me different creams for them.  It is frustrating because I don't know how to go about getting a actual diagnosis besides this biopsy. I was told to request a different specialist, but supposedly there is a waiting period for most in our area. 
    • Thanks for all of the replies. I've just found out I'm not getting to see a dietician because of not having a definite diagnosis which is another blow. I've had loads of bloods done but they just say they're all normal. I did have low vitamin D and high parathyroid but it's sorted itself out after a course of high dose vitamin D and they're not checking it again for a year. No chance of getting referred to endocrinology, gastro won't do it and neither will my gp. I've tried giving up coffee and all fizzy juice and it hasn't made a difference. I'm exhausted and scared and still have no clue what to do next. My gp has zero experience dealing with this type of thing - last time I was there she said it could be because I've restricted my diet too much and I should eat more gluten-free replacement products - everything I've read online says this is the worst thing to do! I'm asking for a copy of the last blood results this week so I can go through them myself but other than that I'm pretty stuck. 
    • I really am iffy on talking about this side of my gluten issues, I think I am about to ruin my reputation on this forum coming about as some extreme crazy guy saying this but I wanted to get this off my chest and perhaps see if anyone else might share a similar trauma. I get emotional recalling it, this side of my reactions, as it is most ingrained and very traumatizing experience, and I am not proud of it as the mentality I have now disgust me but I am going to come out about it. One of the scariest things in this world is when your own mind turns against you, when you can not think about what you want to think about, when you can not do what you know you should be able to do. When I got glutened really bad these where things I felt with my own mind would start looping, and thoughts would not come together. I would loose comprehension, feel like I know I should be able to think about something but my mind was not working. The same thing looped over and over and over like a broken record, This led to anger, anxiety, depression, panic, top it off with loss of feeling in my hands and feet, and the pains in the gut......it was a nightmare. I would go as far as beating my head against walls and punching them out of frustration as to why my own body and mind where not working, I just wanted it to end the pain to stop. I still have scars on my fist from punching into a nail in a stud once and kept going.....I scared everyone and myself distanced my self from loved ones. And started running a bucket list accepting that I was going to die soon. Hell to this day parts of the brain damage seem to be permanent as I can no longer do computer programing or some forms of math, they just no longer make any sense or connect. Then we learned what was causing it, and once the symptoms started to fade, I would get very angry if someone in the shared house did something stupid and got me sick again. The fear of going back to that caused violent and drastic actions to get away from what was making me sick. The sheer fear of my own mind turning on me led me to drastic actions to prevent it, throwing everything away I thought could make me sick, making sure no one else used that kitchen, used freezer paper and gloves when fixing my foods and working in there. I really destroyed and burned all bridges I had then and alienated myself from others. In the end it motivated me to learn how to cook, to get and renovate my own apartment in a building downtown, and start a business to pay for my new diet, by selling safe food to others with this issues locally at farmer markets. But it changed me on a very deep level, that traumatic experience to this day I have a issue looking at others and dealing with other humans who eat that stuff.......the stuff that breaks my mind and body so horrifically. If I have to compare it to something its like watching aliens drinking antifreeze and eating poison.....it causes a subconscious level of disgust and slight envy. I really can not even look at the stuff without recall what it does and feeling a twitch. I know I am the alien here, but it feels vise versa, and I look down on the normal people as odd creatures.  I go to the store and find myself overly avoiding contamination, keeping stuff in my own bags, asking the cashier to scan and bag it as I pass it not letting it touch that flour I see on the belt. I am hyper sensitive to the stuff I know and that fear semi dominates my mind as crazy as it sounds.  I am recovering and am forcing myself to try to mingle with other humans overlooking that one thing, but that deep rooted trauma still flares up as a protective measure especially around foods.  I could talk on and on about the other side effects but this one is the hardest to talk about it, and I feel others might be able to relate to it.    
    • Time.  You need time to heal.  Yeah, I am like a broken record!  😄 So...Lycra is your best friend for now (that and old baggy sweats!).  Hang in there!  Hugs!     
    • So far dairy seems to be OK, as are eggs. I like canned chickpeas so will carry on with those. Beans I had ruled out at one point with the doctor's recommendation to go with the low FODMAPs diet but will reintroduce those now I know it probably wasn't that causing the problems.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,647
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    iFitCeliac
    Joined