Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

What Is Polenta & What Do I Do With It?


  • Please log in to reply

22 replies to this topic

#1 K-Dawg

 
K-Dawg

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 118 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 09:08 AM

Ok. So I"m grocery shopping (a chore I kind of despise since being diagnosed with celiac disease) and I see this yellow tube. A closer inspection reveals it to be something called polenta.

Obviously I"m completely clueless about polenta. Never seen it before in my life (oh what a sheltered life I must lead).

Now that I have it, does anyone have any idea what I should do with it?? lol. Something SIMPLE (without tomatoes, which I am allergic to).

Maybe you just fry it up or something? I"m pretty excited to find an entirely new food.

Also, I saw some Shirataki Noodles at my grocery store -- they are also gluten free. WOAH. It was a big day - two new foods. ;-)

K-Dawg
  • 0
Many autoimmune disorders: Graves Disease in 1998, Psoriasis on or about 2000, Hashimoto's in 2008.

Severely anemic in 2007 (undetectable iron levels)

Elevated liver enzymes (ALT and AST) as of October 2008.

Negative blood test for celiac disease in February 2009, followed by diagnosis of celiac disease in April 2009 after positive biopsy.

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 lizard00

 
lizard00

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,528 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 09:24 AM

My favorite way to eat polenta is to cut it into thin slices and fry it in olive oil. I had some for breakfast this morning :)

I've heard of people putting tomato sauce (wouldn't work for you, but maybe some other sort of sauce) and some cheese on top and then either broiling it or baking it. I think I tried that once... but I just prefer it by itself.

New foods are fun. I found sugar plums today at Whole Foods... never had them, so of course, I had to buy them. :lol:
  • 0
Be yourself, everyone else is taken.
Oscar Wilde

Gluten free November 2007
IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive
Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008
Soy free Jan 09

#3 daphniela

 
daphniela

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 204 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 09:30 AM

you can cut it up into fry shapes and dip it in oil and put it in the oven and make polenta fries.
  • 0

#4 jerseyangel

 
jerseyangel

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,939 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 09:32 AM

All these ideas sound so good--what is a good brand of Polenta to look for? I've never had it.
  • 0
Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#5 ranger

 
ranger

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 562 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 09:52 AM

I eat fried polenta with maple syrup and sausage a couple times a week. If you make your own, you can be more flexible, and its easy to make. I make a pepper gravy and add cheddar cheese to soft polenta- really good. You can slice it and use it for a crust for a savory pie, fry in olive oil and top with alfredo sauce, a million things. Anything that goes good with cornbread will work. You can bake or fry it to make croutons to float in chili or chilled as croutons on a ham chef salad. But the fried in butter with maple syrup is still my favorite. Btw, before polenta became popular that was called fried mush!
  • 0

#6 Tim-n-VA

 
Tim-n-VA

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 577 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 09:58 AM

Help me here. I thought polenta was sort between corn meal and corn grits. I'm either wrong about that or I don't undertands the suggestion to cut it into strips and fry.
  • 0

#7 Mtndog

 
Mtndog

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,254 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 10:02 AM

I eat fried polenta with maple syrup and sausage a couple times a week. If you make your own, you can be more flexible, and its easy to make. I make a pepper gravy and add cheddar cheese to soft polenta- really good. You can slice it and use it for a crust for a savory pie, fry in olive oil and top with alfredo sauce, a million things. Anything that goes good with cornbread will work. You can bake or fry it to make croutons to float in chili or chilled as croutons on a ham chef salad. But the fried in butter with maple syrup is still my favorite. Btw, before polenta became popular that was called fried mush!


Finding new foods is funny sometimes- it's like What is THIS and What the HECK do I do with it? That's how I felt about quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) and now I LOVE quinoa pasta (but still don't know what the heck to do with real quinoa).

Ranger's ideas sound yummy! I make a polenta lasagna (you could try it with a different sauce). Frying it in olive oil makes it versatile because it tastes like a corncake.

If you find the dry kind (not in a tube but in a box) you can use it as a pie crust for stuff like chicken pot pie.

It actually is yummy stuff- polenta fries YUMMMMM...............
  • 0
***************************
Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.
Albert Careb


Posted Image

#8 Juliebove

 
Juliebove

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,650 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 10:11 AM

Help me here. I thought polenta was sort between corn meal and corn grits. I'm either wrong about that or I don't undertands the suggestion to cut it into strips and fry.


I think it's the same as grits. Just has an Italian name.
  • 0

#9 K-Dawg

 
K-Dawg

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 118 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 10:23 AM

mmmm. Polenta french fries! I will try this for sure.

Ranger, you're ideas sound very good (THX) and I love the breakfast one (with mapel syrup and sausage). Are you slicing it up into strips or using some other form of polenta (not found in a tube)?


Also, what is soft polenta? lol. I"m such a polenta newbie.


I eat fried polenta with maple syrup and sausage a couple times a week. If you make your own, you can be more flexible, and its easy to make. I make a pepper gravy and add cheddar cheese to soft polenta- really good. You can slice it and use it for a crust for a savory pie, fry in olive oil and top with alfredo sauce, a million things. Anything that goes good with cornbread will work. You can bake or fry it to make croutons to float in chili or chilled as croutons on a ham chef salad. But the fried in butter with maple syrup is still my favorite. Btw, before polenta became popular that was called fried mush!


  • 0
Many autoimmune disorders: Graves Disease in 1998, Psoriasis on or about 2000, Hashimoto's in 2008.

Severely anemic in 2007 (undetectable iron levels)

Elevated liver enzymes (ALT and AST) as of October 2008.

Negative blood test for celiac disease in February 2009, followed by diagnosis of celiac disease in April 2009 after positive biopsy.

#10 Gemini

 
Gemini

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,160 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 10:48 AM

mmmm. Polenta french fries! I will try this for sure.

Ranger, you're ideas sound very good (THX) and I love the breakfast one (with mapel syrup and sausage). Are you slicing it up into strips or using some other form of polenta (not found in a tube)?


Also, what is soft polenta? lol. I"m such a polenta newbie.


Polenta is just the type of cornmeal used...it differs from grits. It is all ground corn though, just ground to varying degrees. It is most always made from yellow cornmeal, as opposed to white corn.

There are the tubes of polenta sold in grocery stores which is precooked and more compressed. You can cut it up and serve it many ways, as mentioned above.
You can also make your own, which is very similar in preparation to making oatmeal only you stir it much longer. There is a trick to making polenta on the stove so you won't end up with lumpy corn mush. Add the polenta s-l-o-w-l-y to the boiling water and stir constantly until done...about 20-30 minutes, depending on your stove. It used to be the grandmother's job to stand over the stove and make good polenta as it's time consuming but oh-so-worth-it! There may be quicker cooking polenta available.

Once it is cooked, it will have the consistency of oatmeal, hence the term "soft" polenta. You can also pour it into a baking pan and cook it further in the oven.
I love it cooked, off the stove, and covered with spaghetti sauce and ground parmesan. It's delicious and filling.
  • 0

#11 tarnalberry

 
tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts
 

Posted 22 July 2009 - 01:41 PM

Help me here. I thought polenta was sort between corn meal and corn grits. I'm either wrong about that or I don't undertands the suggestion to cut it into strips and fry.


It is, but sometimes you can find "premade" polenta, that's already been mixed with water and spices and par-cooked, in a plastic tube. Something a little quicker than from-scratch polenta.

HAH! TUBE FOOD! :lol: :lol:
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#12 ranger

 
ranger

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 562 posts
 

Posted 23 July 2009 - 04:35 AM

Polenta is cornmeal. I use the tube stuff for frying (ease), but make my own for sides. basically, you boil cornmeal with liquid. If it's a side, use it warm. If you put it in a loaf pan and refridgerate, it becomes solid and you can cut it into shapes for baking or frying. here's a recipe for cheddar polenta:

1 cup milk
2/3 cup polenta (cornmeal)
2 Tbps butter
1 tsp hot sauce
1 cup grated cheddar

Bring milk to boil. Whisk in polenta. Turn heat to med. Stir well till thick. Add rest of ingrediants.
Makes 2 generous servings.

You can use water, stock, or any liquid you care to. Mix with cooked sausage while warm, put in loaf pan overnight, and you have a version of srapple you can fry for breakfast.Happy eating!
  • 0

#13 lizard00

 
lizard00

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,528 posts
 

Posted 23 July 2009 - 07:54 AM

Polenta is cornmeal. I use the tube stuff for frying (ease), but make my own for sides. basically, you boil cornmeal with liquid. If it's a side, use it warm. If you put it in a loaf pan and refridgerate, it becomes solid and you can cut it into shapes for baking or frying. here's a recipe for cheddar polenta:

1 cup milk
2/3 cup polenta (cornmeal)
2 Tbps butter
1 tsp hot sauce
1 cup grated cheddar

Bring milk to boil. Whisk in polenta. Turn heat to med. Stir well till thick. Add rest of ingrediants.
Makes 2 generous servings.

You can use water, stock, or any liquid you care to. Mix with cooked sausage while warm, put in loaf pan overnight, and you have a version of srapple you can fry for breakfast.Happy eating!


That sounds really good. Is it like cooking risotto... you have to stir constantly? Just want to know if I ever decide to make it what I could be getting myself into. :lol:
  • 0
Be yourself, everyone else is taken.
Oscar Wilde

Gluten free November 2007
IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive
Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008
Soy free Jan 09

#14 K-Dawg

 
K-Dawg

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 118 posts
 

Posted 23 July 2009 - 08:16 AM

Thanks Ranger -- that sounds so good.

Polenta is cornmeal. I use the tube stuff for frying (ease), but make my own for sides. basically, you boil cornmeal with liquid. If it's a side, use it warm. If you put it in a loaf pan and refridgerate, it becomes solid and you can cut it into shapes for baking or frying. here's a recipe for cheddar polenta:

1 cup milk
2/3 cup polenta (cornmeal)
2 Tbps butter
1 tsp hot sauce
1 cup grated cheddar

Bring milk to boil. Whisk in polenta. Turn heat to med. Stir well till thick. Add rest of ingrediants.
Makes 2 generous servings.

You can use water, stock, or any liquid you care to. Mix with cooked sausage while warm, put in loaf pan overnight, and you have a version of srapple you can fry for breakfast.Happy eating!


  • 0
Many autoimmune disorders: Graves Disease in 1998, Psoriasis on or about 2000, Hashimoto's in 2008.

Severely anemic in 2007 (undetectable iron levels)

Elevated liver enzymes (ALT and AST) as of October 2008.

Negative blood test for celiac disease in February 2009, followed by diagnosis of celiac disease in April 2009 after positive biopsy.

#15 LisaaaNoel

 
LisaaaNoel

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36 posts
 

Posted 23 July 2009 - 09:06 AM

I love polenta.

I grill mine. (so good, but you could also just fry in olive oil) then I make a wild mushroom herbed ragu to pour over it. :D

Or you could also do a polenta napoleon. Use polenta as the base and layer it with vegetables (mushroom, zucchini, onions, whatever you like) cheese (if you can tolerate it) and then a little drizzle of pesto!
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: