Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Horrible Slate Article


  • Please log in to reply

69 replies to this topic

#31 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 12:35 PM

It's my understanding that Ron Hoggan's doctorate is in education, not medicine.


And we all know how informed about gluten the typical medical degree makes one :o
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#32 admin

 
admin

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,477 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 12:43 PM

Uhhh, sorry, what did your comment have to do with Ron's response? I assume that the guy who wrote the article in Slate isn't a doctor either...I also am not a doctor...do we need to be doctors of medicine to respond to Slate's incorrect article?

Take care,
Scott

It's my understanding that Ron Hoggan's doctorate is in education, not medicine.


  • 0
Scott Adams
Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator
Founder Gluten-Free Mall
Founder Celiac.com

#33 TrillumHunter

 
TrillumHunter

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 12:51 PM

"Ironically, the people who may benefit most from the current vogue are those who have been gluten-free all along. The proliferation of gluten-free products has made life for a full-blown celiac easier than it's ever been, and a greater awareness of gluten-related disorders has more celiac patients getting diagnosed than ever before. (There are still thought to be millions of undiagnosed cases in the United States.) Let's hope those gains aren't erased when the conventional wisdom shifts again and we leave this diet craze behind us." The Slate article


"Your ill-informed attack on a gluten free diet is regrettable because it suggests it is a fad diet rather than a therapeutic one." Ron Hoggan

How did you come to this conclusion after reading the last paragraph?

Surely some of you can see it IS becoming a fad for lots of people? The sad thing is lots of those people DO have celiac but they'll never know because Elizabeth Hasselback says to just try it!
  • 0

#34 neesee

 
neesee

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 243 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 01:32 PM

Uhhh, sorry, what did your comment have to do with Ron's response? I assume that the guy who wrote the article in Slate isn't a doctor either...I also am not a doctor...do we need to be doctors of medicine to respond to Slate's incorrect article?

Take care,
Scott


You hold Ron Hoggan up to this forum like he is some sort of an authority figure about celiac disease and non celiac gluten sensitivity. He has no more education on the subject than you or I do. He is a retired special education teacher who is making money selling books he's probably not qualified to write.

Besides, Ron didn't put his response here, you did.
  • 0

#35 Tim-n-VA

 
Tim-n-VA

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 577 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 01:37 PM

It's my understanding that Ron Hoggan's doctorate is in education, not medicine.


Thanks. With "Dr." in the byline and starting with references to a medical doctor by name, it was not clear.
  • 0

#36 admin

 
admin

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,477 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 02:04 PM

Does this mean you read the article?
Scott

Thanks. With "Dr." in the byline and starting with references to a medical doctor by name, it was not clear.


  • 0
Scott Adams
Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator
Founder Gluten-Free Mall
Founder Celiac.com

#37 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 02:32 PM

Surely some of you can see it IS becoming a fad for lots of people? The sad thing is lots of those people DO have celiac but they'll never know because Elizabeth Hasselback says to just try it!


There may be a small percentage of masochists out there who have adopted it as a "fad", but I do not see that as a problem. And while I am no fan of Elizabeth Hasselback, I personally don't find it particularly sad that I don't KNOW for sure that I have celiac disease, and my insurance companies don't either. It is enough for me that members of my family have it and by eliminating gluten I discovered all the other foods my body was objecting to which were masked by the overwhelming gluten response.
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#38 Jestgar

 
Jestgar

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,755 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 03:01 PM

There may be a small percentage of masochists out there who have adopted it as a "fad",

I just have a hard time seeing anyone in their right mind doing this diet as a fad. At least not to the point that they'd be annoying waiters and such as much as we do. I'm all for people cutting back on gluten, but who is going to buy an $8 loaf of mediocre bread if they don't have to?

I wonder if there is simply an overwhelming number of people who feel bad when they eat gluten, and this is too hard for mainstream media to accept.

I, personally, have never met a single person who does this diet as a "healthy lifestyle choice".
  • 0
"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"
- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.
- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

#39 TrillumHunter

 
TrillumHunter

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 03:14 PM

Oh they aren't masochists, they're sadists. They're the people who make everyone buy them special crackers and then proceed to eat the cheesecake because "it's only a little gluten." You haven't come across any of these folks? That is great because they are screwing us over.

I frankly don't think it's important at all to be officially diagnosed. What I do think is important is not misrepresenting oneself as celiac and proceeding to EAT GLUTEN.

Anything that is touted as causing weight loss is going to become a fad.

"At least not to the point that they'd be annoying waiters and such as much as we do." Have you ever been a server? Some people LIVE for a reason to do this.
  • 0

#40 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,793 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 03:20 PM

It's my understanding that Ron Hoggan's doctorate is in education, not medicine.


So what!!!! :angry: So to you that means he can't have done any research or have knowledge about celiac or gluten intolerance. I have much more knowledge about celiac than any of the doctors I have seen except perhaps for the allergist who was the primary doctor responsible for my diagnosis. You don't need an MD behind your name to do research and become knowledgeable about something. I suppose I should be thankful for my doctors ignorance, after all they are directly responsible for all the time I have had to research due to the medical issues that were to far advanced to resolve.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#41 ravenwoodglass

 
ravenwoodglass

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,793 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 03:25 PM

You might find this response interesting:
http://www.celiac.co...late/Page1.html

Take care,
Scott


Thanks for posting that. I found it to be a good response to an article of questionable value.
  • 0
Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying
"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)


celiac 49 years - Misdiagnosed for 45
Blood tested and repeatedly negative
Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002
Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis
All bold resoved or went into remission with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002
Some residual nerve damage remains as of 2006- this has continued to resolve after eliminating soy in 2007

Mother died of celiac related cancer at 56
Twin brother died as a result of autoimmune liver destruction at age 15

Children 2 with Ulcers, GERD, Depression, , 1 with DH, 1 with severe growth stunting (male adult 5 feet)both finally diagnosed Celiac through blood testing and 1 with endo 6 months after Mom


Positive to Soy and Casien also Aug 2007

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test Aug 2007
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

#42 mushroom

 
mushroom

    Mushroom

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,448 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 03:50 PM

Oh they aren't masochists, they're sadists. They're the people who make everyone buy them special crackers and then proceed to eat the cheesecake because "it's only a little gluten." You haven't come across any of these folks? That is great because they are screwing us over.


You obviously have a bone to pick with someone but it's not any non-gluten eating person I know--they all bring their own crackers. These folks you are talking about are the same kinds of people who sit down and eat a high-glycemic, sugar-laden meal and then go inject themselves with insulin, and I do know at least one of those.
  • 0
Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#43 Tim-n-VA

 
Tim-n-VA

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 577 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:04 PM

Does this mean you read the article?
Scott


Yes.
  • 0

#44 TrillumHunter

 
TrillumHunter

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:25 PM

You obviously have a bone to pick with someone but it's not any non-gluten eating person I know--they all bring their own crackers. These folks you are talking about are the same kinds of people who sit down and eat a high-glycemic, sugar-laden meal and then go inject themselves with insulin, and I do know at least one of those.


Maybe I do have a bone to pick but it isn't with you personally. I think deciding to go gluten-free because you have a family history and you know it bothers you is pretty damn responsible. Folks with pictures of their battered insides can't always do it.

My bone is with the knee-jerk criticism of any author who dares to question the validity of recommending a gluten-free diet for the general population. The author did not deny celiac disease in any way. He did, as many in medical research still do, question the idea of gluten intolerance. He questioned the appropriateness of the celebrity advice book that touts the weight loss benefits of a gluten-free diet on the jacket of the book. He gets demonized for that?

I don't know anyone who follows the gluten-free diet who demands things of a host but I know a couple of chronic "dieters" who do.
  • 0

#45 Mother of Jibril

 
Mother of Jibril

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,000 posts
 

Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:43 PM

I have much more knowledge about celiac than any of the doctors I have seen except perhaps for the allergist who was the primary doctor responsible for my diagnosis. You don't need an MD behind your name to do research and become knowledgeable about something.

Really!! While I trusted my gastroenterologist (who was checking for evidence of mastocytosis in my GI system, not celiac) to perform an endoscopy, I had to explain the results of my genetic test from Enterolab... *0302 is DQ8. He had no idea. Once I explained he thought I was smart to stay on the gluten-free diet. I give him a lot of credit for listening to me.

I've come to realize that nobody knows my body like I do! Even medical doctors. I live in my body 24 hours a day... so when something is bothering me I'm very persistent about doing the necessary research. I've accumulated a LOT of knowledge. The main reason I come here is to share it.

Thank you for everything that YOU have shared, ravenwoodglass :)
  • 0
Gluten free 08/08
Son has IgE allergies to peanuts and corn
Hashimoto's, MCAD, pregnancy loss at 17 weeks
HLA-DQB1*0302 (celiac), HLA-DQB1*0301 (gluten sensitive)
Serological equivalent 3,3 (subtype 8,7)
Extensive family history of autoimmune disorders and related symptoms




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: