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Substitute For Chili Powder


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9 replies to this topic

#1 GlutenGalAZ

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 01:47 PM

I need a substitute for Chili Powder.
Nightshade Free Please.

Trying to make a Taco Seasoning.
Someone had mentioned Cumin, Salt and Pepper.
I am not familiar with Cumin. Is it a type of spice that is strong and you want to watch out for how much you use?

We mainly just use Chili Powder and Tomato Sauce BUT wtih going Nightshade Free we are trying to find a simple sub for this.

It would be used with a pound of Ground Turkey (our first try too wtih Ground Turkey ahhh so use to Ground Beef)....

Any thoughts/input on Cumin or another route for Nightshade Free (no tomatoes, Peppers, Eggplant or Potaoes) Taco Seasoning.....
Thank you!!
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Rebecca

Partial Gluten Free March 2007
Completely Gluten Free February 2008
Tapioca Starch/Flour Free April 2008
No MSG July 2008
Cut out Nitrates//Nitrites January 2009
Problems with Tomatoes and Potatoes -- Cut out Nightshades Aug '09

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#2 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 02:37 PM

I presume nightshades include all members of the capsicum family? In which case, you're not going to find a substitute that really makes up for chili powder. But you can find a different flavor. For nightshade free taco meat, I'd use italian spices (particularly thyme and oregano), garlic, onion, cumin (it's a seed... how much you use varies significantly on your taste preference... start with a small amount, mix it in, and taste). (Thyme and onion are not in classic chili powder recipes, but I like 'em. :) )
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#3 lpellegr

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 02:52 PM

If you want to heat it up like peppers do, maybe horseradish? A. I don't know if horseradish plants are in the nightshade family, and B. this could be a really weird combination and might take some experimenting, but if you're looking for something to make your mouth burn, horseradish could do it.
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#4 purple

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 03:41 PM

I presume nightshades include all members of the capsicum family? In which case, you're not going to find a substitute that really makes up for chili powder. But you can find a different flavor. For nightshade free taco meat, I'd use italian spices (particularly thyme and oregano), garlic, onion, cumin (it's a seed... how much you use varies significantly on your taste preference... start with a small amount, mix it in, and taste). (Thyme and onion are not in classic chili powder recipes, but I like 'em. :) )


I agree with the garlic, onion and cumin ;) Some recipes call for oregano. Try garlic salt and onion salt instead of plain salt. Then use some dried or fresh. My cumin is powdered.
I just checked my taco seasoning package back and it has all 4 above mentioned seasonings.
What about yucky cilantro (is it nightshade free?). I bought some dried to get my taste buds used to it. :rolleyes:
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#5 TrillumHunter

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 04:00 PM

Since you are in Arizona you should be able to find Mexican oregano pretty easily. For me, it was what was missing from my Mexican foods all those years. Combined with garlic and cumin it forms a very authentic taste. It has a very different taste from Italian oregano.
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#6 Takala

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 04:12 PM

Ginger and Tumeric are other heat spices. How are you with cocoa powder and cinnamon ?

I would do this.

Fresh grated horseradish or ginger root.
Cumin.
Pinch of cinnamon.
A little bit of cocoa powder.
Apple cider vinegar.
Pinch of oregano.
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#7 jststric

 
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Posted 13 August 2009 - 04:19 PM

thank you for whomever figured out what Nightshade meant, lol!

I cannot have chili powder AT ALL and we are a family that grew up on Mexican food. My poor boys put up with all my substitutions. They even seem to like my mexican meat that I make often. I use garlic, garlic salt, pepper (lightly), cumin (to me, the more the better but you CAN overdo) and CILANTRO---fresh OR dried (again...cannot do too much, imo, lol) I cannot do beans either and I have substituted for beans in many different recipes---you'll think I'm nuts (!) .......hominy!! I will still ask my son if he wants me to make it with or without the hominy and he will say WITH everytime. Looks different, but it's good!
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#8 GlutenGalAZ

 
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Posted 14 August 2009 - 07:03 PM

Thank you everyone for the replies and great suggestions.
The Italian one sounds neat but my husband isn't really into that type of seasoning. Maybe I will try it sometime on my own (I like that type of flavor).

I was nervous about Cumin b/c I have never used or tried it before. I have a closed one at my house that I bought a while ago for a recipe that called for it.... I just opened it tonight to smell it and my gosh it smells good ha! Sounds funny but I thought it was going to be icky smelling or something not good, but it smells similar to chili powder but stronger so this will be neat.

I think I will look at Garlic Salt or Lemon Salt (saw the McCormick ones the other day) and try that like suggested instead of regular salt.

We are going to try this out this weekend. Thank you everyone again. I am definitly looking forward to this now and don't feel as nervous.

Happy Baking =)
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Rebecca

Partial Gluten Free March 2007
Completely Gluten Free February 2008
Tapioca Starch/Flour Free April 2008
No MSG July 2008
Cut out Nitrates//Nitrites January 2009
Problems with Tomatoes and Potatoes -- Cut out Nightshades Aug '09

#9 awisewoman

 
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Posted 20 August 2009 - 06:43 AM

Rebecca, I am very new (1 wk) into gluten-free. I am also Dairy Free the same time period. Let me know how this works out for you, okay? I agree about using cumin, just always make sure your spices are fresh because that is a real bummer when not. Fresh cut cilantro added at the last is great and if you do want heat, the horseradish is fine, just a tiny bit. Anne

Edited by awisewoman, 20 August 2009 - 06:49 AM.

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#10 daphniela

 
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Posted 20 August 2009 - 06:54 AM

I am Mexican and grew up eating beans and rice. Cumin is used in most Mexican cooking. If you have ever had enchiladas, it is in the sauce so you have probably tasted it before without knowing it. I would use salt, garlic, onion powder, mexican oregano (if you can't find it reglular oregano is fine) and cumin.
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