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High Altitude Keep It Simple Stupid Bread Recipe


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5 replies to this topic

#1 roxi

 
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Posted 16 August 2009 - 06:14 PM

I'd like to share a recipe I developed through trial and error. I didn't want to mix several types of flour to make bread, and I wanted to keep the number of ingredients to a minimum so I would be happy to make several loaves a week (and I do make at least three loaves a week for my growing family and myself!). I call it K.I.S.S. bread.

It works great at 6,500 ft where I live, the bread is delicious, and makes fabulous toast and french toast, pizza dough, rolls, etc...

Put into bread maker, in this order:

2 eggs
2 3/4 cups warm milk

start the paddle going to mix this up. While the paddle is going add the remaining ingredients, in the order listed:

2 cups non-fat dry milk
1 whole bag Bob's Red Mill Brown Rice flour (it has to be Bob's, the others are gritty)
2 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
2 tsp dry yeast

It takes about 7 minutes for me to add these ingredients to the bread machine. Sometimes I stop the machine and scoop out some dough to make pizza or rolls. The dough is the consistency of cake batter, it pours, it doesn't kneed.

Good luck! :)
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#2 Jana315

 
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Posted 20 August 2009 - 09:15 PM

I'm at altitude but don't have a bread maker. Do you think I can do it with the same ingredients or would I need to change it up? I'm in need of an edible gluten-free bread in a bad, bad way!
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self-diagnosed gluten intolerant May 2009
positive dietary response
gluten free since 5/13/2009
nightshade free since 5/16/2009
DQ2, DQ8 negative, Kimball Genetics 7/2009

#3 bpchick

 
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Posted 28 April 2011 - 08:42 PM

I see someone else asked the same question, but got no reply. I also am interested in this high-altitude version, but do not have a bread machine.

Does anyone have experience with a good sandwich-type bread (preferable a brown bread) at high altitude?

Thanks!
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#4 RiceGuy

 
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Posted 29 April 2011 - 06:47 AM

I see someone else asked the same question, but got no reply. I also am interested in this high-altitude version, but do not have a bread machine.

Does anyone have experience with a good sandwich-type bread (preferable a brown bread) at high altitude?

Thanks!

Though I'm not at a high elevation, I've never needed a bread machine to make what IMO is a decent brown bread. I also mix the dough by hand, not a mixer. From what I've read, some simple adjustments should yield good results when taking a recipe to a high altitude. This page has some good tips: http://www.ochef.com/327.htm

My latest bread recipe can be found here. There I give a method to experiment with a small amount of dough, so you won't have to worry about having a full loaf turn out unsatisfactorily. Feel free to ask questions there, as I am very interested in making sure it works for you (I'm writing a gluten-free baking book).
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A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

#5 bpchick

 
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Posted 03 May 2011 - 01:52 PM

RiceGuy,
Thanks for the comments and suggestions.

I saw your post and the detail of your recipe, but you could be more specific for the psyllium husk--do you use the psyllium seed husks as is, or do you grind them into a powder/flour?

And I assume you are using one package of yeast dissolved in warm water? I didn't see any mention of yeast added to your recipe.

I see the flour mixture, the psyllium husk and the guar gum, just wondering if there is anything else.

How long do you let it rise and then bake on what temp?
Thanks!
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#6 RiceGuy

 
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Posted 04 May 2011 - 06:02 AM

RiceGuy,
Thanks for the comments and suggestions.

I saw your post and the detail of your recipe, but you could be more specific for the psyllium husk--do you use the psyllium seed husks as is, or do you grind them into a powder/flour?

And I assume you are using one package of yeast dissolved in warm water? I didn't see any mention of yeast added to your recipe.

I see the flour mixture, the psyllium husk and the guar gum, just wondering if there is anything else.

How long do you let it rise and then bake on what temp?
Thanks!

I do answer all these questions and more in that thread. I think it should be well-worth your time to read.

I specify ground psyllium husk, which is how it comes when I purchase it. I do not use an entire packet of yeast for one loaf. Rather, approximately 1/2 rounded teaspoon per cup of flour.

The temps for rising and baking are also given in that thread, as is the volume and temp of the warm water. It is important to understand that the length of time to let it rise should never be by the clock, but according to how much the dough rises. The ratio of flour to water is also very important, and may need to be adjusted for your altitude. But based on experience, and what I've read about high altitude baking, I wonder if the rise time may be the more significant factor.
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A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.




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