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Type O Blood And Celaic?
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25 posts in this topic

Has anyone heard of the link between type O blood type and Celiac? A friend was told by a doctor that since she had type O blood, a gluten free diet might help her. Any news?

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Dr.Adamo has book eat for your specific blood type. SOme believe in this & others totally disagree. O type is the oldest blood type , way before grains were introduced . O bloodtypes are meat eaters not grain eaters.

In years passed I never ate much meat but before celiac I was told I needed to eat some meat or more meat. After I learned to eat more meat I started to have more energy & felt a bit better. I now eat meat almost daily not alot but the appriorate amount.

hth

mamaw

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I agree with mawmaw. Some say a type O person is more likely to have celiac than others, particularly if you are of north European extraction (since 33 % of north Europeans have the gene potential to get celiac--that and Italians probably due to interbreeding during Roman times as well as Viking incursions previous to that). Type O is the oldest blood type from pre-Agrarian times and thus developed before grains became such a large part of the human diet. No matter what, type O's seem to do better with eating some meat rather than be a vegetarian.

Glutenous grains were introduced to North Europeans roughly 1200 to 1500 years later than in the rest of Europe.

The original "bread basket" was in Mesopotamia. Back then barley was the first glutenous grain used. It and the early forms of wheat had far less gluten than what is produced today. Ironically grain produced in the north has more gluten in it due to the shorter growing season.

Bea

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I read that Blood Type Diet book and I am also O negative. According to the book O's are the ones that need to be the most limited to be "optimal". And much of what it said seemed to ring true about the foods that I have become intolerant of. I am the carnivore also. I always thought it was because I grew up in the midwest, lol. I have no idea about the supposed link between Celiacs and O blood-types, but it IS an interesting read and it DID have me pretty much correctly pegged.

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I'm AB+. It would be interesting to take a poll to see if there is anything to this. My guess is no.

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My blood type is A+. If O blood types are more susceptible to Celiac, then that would make most the population of the world Celiac. It could be possible. There are more type O's in the world. O+ is the most common blood type. O- is the rarest.

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My blood type is A+. If O blood types are more susceptible to Celiac, then that would make most the population of the world Celiac. It could be possible. There are more type O's in the world. O+ is the most common blood type. O- is the rarest.

While O- is rare than O+ and A+, it's not the rarest. B- and AB- are much much rarer.

As for the blood type diet, IMO it's pure nonsense.

richard

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There was a poll a while back, I'm not sure if it was this site or the delphi site. The bloodtype diet is head -on for some & others it is totally off. I'm O- as well as daughter, brother & we all are celiac..... I do know how much better I am without wheat & gluten ...

I also know many medical professionals that do not eat wheat or gluten because it has been so altered that most do not digest it properly. If only we were cows with a couple of stomachs to digest this poison!!!!

I know we will never go back......

mamaw

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It would be interesting if there was real scientific studies behind these claims.

I do know that while many in my family either have celiac or are gluten intolerant, I am the only one that has type O blood--and I am a lot more sensitive than the rest of them.

Nevertheless, we all are related to everyone else, so its a bit of a genetic stew at this point as to whose blood type is what and whether or not they have celiac!

Meanwhile if you are North European or Italian, your chances go way up to have celiac; and in my opinion if you have type O blood too, it makes it even more likely. However I could well be wrong! No matter what though, being a vegetarian for such a person might be difficult at best.

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Well, My sister the celiac is a Type A+, as is our dad, and myself. All gluten intolerant, and I am much more severe in my intolerance's then either of them.

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Hee! I'm O+, Italian (on both sides) and Celiac.

I don't think there's much to the Blood Type Diet, though.

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Has anyone heard of the link between type O blood type and Celiac? A friend was told by a doctor that since she had type O blood, a gluten free diet might help her. Any news?

From a post by Mother of Jibril in an earlier thread:

"....according the American Red Cross, here's the prevalence of each blood type in the US population:

O pos - 38%

O neg - 7%

A pos - 34%

A neg - 6%

B pos - 9%

B neg - 2%

AB pos - 3%

AB neg -1%"

O+ is the most common type.

Please understand that there is absolutely NO clinical research that proves that this diet is valid.

The Blood Type diet was developed by a naturopath named Peter D

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For Me I did not stop eating wheat because of his book! I was gluten free way before I read his book & Again I think some may fall under his theory by fluke!

For another family member it is way off, not even close!

I have one celiac gene & 1 gluten intolerant.....

I can't say I buy into the book..........

mamaw

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P.S. Everyone is descended from the same group of hunter-gatherers, and that likely means everyone will do best on the "paleo diet". Which means meat, veggies, and fruit. Period. No grains.

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P.S. Everyone is descended from the same group of hunter-gatherers, and that likely means everyone will do best on the "paleo diet". Which means meat, veggies, and fruit. Period. No grains.

I know I do :D And in many ways, not just digestive.

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If I followed his book, I would be very ill. He recommends that Type A's give up dairy (which I didn't have to do until this year), and switch to soy...which makes me as ill as gluten does.

Some of his thoughts are right on, yet just as many are off the wall. Take it with a grain of salt!

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If I followed his book, I would be very ill. He recommends that Type A's give up dairy (which I didn't have to do until this year), and switch to soy...which makes me as ill as gluten does.

Some of his thoughts are right on, yet just as many are off the wall. Take it with a grain of salt!

But which blood type is salt good for.... ??

;)

Seriously though, I concur with Paleo. I am thriving on it in so many ways. Healing, feeling much better and,ahem, younger. Did I mention brussels sprouts?

Go Paleo!

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Hi.

I'm very common- O+. And I've read A'Damo's book. And I find it curious that his suggestions for me as an O+ seem remarkably accurate. Is it scientific? No. (I'm a black sheep amidst a cerebral family of scientists...) But, it's anecdotally fascinating.

lisa

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Well said. Whether or not D'Adamo has an PhD or even an MD (which he doesn't) the main problem is that the book is based on an untested hypothesis. It is pure speculation supported by anecdote presented as fact. There is no research supporting his claims of a correlative (much less causal) relationship between blood type and celiac or gluten sensitivity. Given the prevalence of type O it is reasonable to assume that a large percentage of the total number of people with either condition will have type O blood. But without proper critical analysis, people with celiac and type O blood will be inclined to say "wow, I have type O blood and celiac. It must be true!" People with AB- might say "I must be a fluke because I don't have type O blood". The scientific method is a collection of procedures designed to account for our natural tendency to see patterns where none exist and for our tendency to seek confirmation of our biases instead of solid proof. Anecdotes are not proof. They are stories deliberately selected to prove a claim. Without repeatable statistically verifiable evidence, such stories are just "affirming the consequent", "post hoc" and false premise logical fallacies.

Until such time as solid, repeatable evidence demonstrating that blood type is a reliable predictor of food sensitivity, it is unproductive to follow D'Adamo's advice. It could be he is right, but it could also be that he is decidedly wrong. Combined with evidence-based evaluations, it is better advice to determine your own physiological responses to various foods and adjust your diet accordingly.

It is interesting that D'Adamo quotes his father (also a Naturopath) on page XV of the introduction (D'Adamo, Peter J, 4 Blood Types, 4 Diets: Eat Right 4/For Your Type, New York: Putnam and Sons. 1996. 392pp), stating that each person needs to be treated as an utterly unique individual (a fallacy right off the bat). The rest of the book essentially makes broad recommendations based on an unsubstantiated relationship (namely blood type to dietary function). It is a terrible shame that the Putnam & Sons were/are willing to publish such manipulative nonsense. Further, it is ethically questionable to perpetuate unsubstantiated claims.

From a post by Mother of Jibril in an earlier thread:

"....according the American Red Cross, here's the prevalence of each blood type in the US population:

O pos - 38%

O neg - 7%

A pos - 34%

A neg - 6%

B pos - 9%

B neg - 2%

AB pos - 3%

AB neg -1%"

O+ is the most common type.

Please understand that there is absolutely NO clinical research that proves that this diet is valid.

The Blood Type diet was developed by a naturopath named Peter D

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Well said. Whether or not D'Adamo has an PhD or even an MD (which he doesn't) the main problem is that the book is based on an untested hypothesis. .

.

Just to let you know that the last post was almost 3 years ago so this isn't a really active thread. The people posting may not still be active on the forums.

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The recent post must have bumped it up!

IMHO the blood type diet is quack science for profit. OK. Not so humble opinion. :-)

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The recent post must have bumped it up!

IMHO the blood type diet is quack science for profit. OK. Not so humble opinion. :-)

Yes it did. I have had people complain that the posters are rude for not responding becuse they don't realize they are responding to people who have moved on. or the info was out of date because they don' t see the date. So I like to point that out. There was a thread of this topic recently the new poster could have chosen to respond to if he wants a discussion.

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Yes it did. I have had people complain that the posters are rude for not responding becuse they don't realize they are responding to people who have moved on. or the info was out of date because they don' t see the date. So I like to point that out. There was a thread of this topic recently the new poster could have chosen to respond to if he wants a discussion.

I didn't notice the date. I will search for the newer thread to participate. Thanks for letting me know.

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You could start one. :)

I have a fried who met D'Adamo by the way. She said he was laughing all the way to the bank. <_< He put the meat and fatty foods everyone likes on the most common type O.

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So yes the blood type diets are not scientific. Think about this though the numbers keep rising for celiac and gluten sensitives with a lot of medical sites saying it is very likely there are many out there that do not know. The number of reported gluten sensi and celiacs and the unknowns may actually be high enough to compare with the percentage of o pos humans out there. Right or wrong I love people questioning things in a manner that starts new studies. If people didn't try to connect things and ask questions like this we may all be sitting around not even knowing we are celiacs or gluten sensitive.

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