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Very High Hdl Cholesterol


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#1 elle's mom

 
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Posted 24 August 2009 - 07:30 PM

Several years ago, before I ever heard of celiac or gluten, I had a physical for life insurance and the only thing that was flagged was my cholesterol. My overall number was high (242), but the ratio of good to bad (HDL:LDL) was within normal range, mainly because my HDL was really high (80s?). I called my doctor about it at the time and was told to simply watch what I ate and it was probably no big deal. A friend of ours is a cardiac-stress-test-technician (this is not the proper title, but I can't think of it-sorry), but he looks at cholesterol numbers all day long so I asked him about it. When he saw my HDL number his exact words were that I was a "phenom"......he was freaking out & said that the only reason the total number was so high was due to this good cholesterol being so high. He assured me that I did not need to worry. I thought "cool". Never thought about it again.

Recently I read that celiacs can actually have low cholesterol. Mentioned this to my sister, who also admittantly has suspect gluten issues, and she told me a very similar story of how HER HDL was really high!

I just wondered if anyone else has experienced anything like this (or completely opposite) or has any evidence that this could be related to gluten/celiac. Thanks.
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~Jackie (Mom of a gluten & dairy-free home)
Myself: Neg blood tests despite myriad of life-long symptoms. Enterolab testing positive for gluten sensitivity: DQ5DQ5. Currently gluten, dairy, grain, & sugar free and on rotation diet.
5yo dd diagnosed celiac by blood test/biopsy Oct/Nov 2007: DQ2DQ5
7yo dd: neg blood tests, DQ5DQ6
3yo ds: neg blood tests, IgA deficient, DQ5DQ6
21mo dd: DQ2DQ5
DH: Neg blood tests, by deductive reasoning: DQ2DQ6.

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#2 ranger

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 05:25 AM

Intresting. Last cholesterol test I had(been a couple of years), doc said 218. That worried me but he said not to worry. Your HDL is 95- off the charts! I wonder if that's the situation for other celiacs. BTW, that's the only good thing I have going for me!
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#3 lizard00

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 06:21 AM

I have really great HDL, too. Somewhere in the 80s. And my LDL is low, somewhere around the 30s. My mom's cholesterol is about the same.... I have celiac, and she doesn't.

I have heard that cholesterol can be low in undiagnosed celiacs, because of malabsorption. I had mine done right when I went gluten-free, then a year later at my physical. There was really no change... so, it seems doubtful this was the case with me.
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Gluten free November 2007
IgA Deficient, Neg Bloodwork, Double DQ2 Positive
Dietary and Genetic Diagnosis June 2, 2008
Soy free Jan 09

#4 mushroom

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 06:30 AM

Count me in as another high HDL(reasonable LDL), so a high overall number but great ratio. Yeah, isn't it nice to have something that is working for you?? :lol:
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

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Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
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Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

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#5 Jestgar

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 06:33 AM

All my numbers are low.

Ya gotta wonder if eating no wheat/low grains is a factor.
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#6 Gemini

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 09:18 AM

Several years ago, before I ever heard of celiac or gluten, I had a physical for life insurance and the only thing that was flagged was my cholesterol. My overall number was high (242), but the ratio of good to bad (HDL:LDL) was within normal range, mainly because my HDL was really high (80s?). I called my doctor about it at the time and was told to simply watch what I ate and it was probably no big deal. A friend of ours is a cardiac-stress-test-technician (this is not the proper title, but I can't think of it-sorry), but he looks at cholesterol numbers all day long so I asked him about it. When he saw my HDL number his exact words were that I was a "phenom"......he was freaking out & said that the only reason the total number was so high was due to this good cholesterol being so high. He assured me that I did not need to worry. I thought "cool". Never thought about it again.

Recently I read that celiacs can actually have low cholesterol. Mentioned this to my sister, who also admittantly has suspect gluten issues, and she told me a very similar story of how HER HDL was really high!

I just wondered if anyone else has experienced anything like this (or completely opposite) or has any evidence that this could be related to gluten/celiac. Thanks.


The reason your cholesterol was not low was probably due to the fact that damage can be patchy with Celiac and, unless you have total villous atrophy, some foods will be absorbed enough to keep your cholesterol normal. Personally, we pay too much attention to cholesterol in this country and people are being put on meds who do not need it. If your HDL (healthy cholesterol) is high and your LDL (bad cholesterol) is low, then the overall number is not as important....this is why they do the ratio. Only 50% of all heart attacks occur in people with high cholesterol so there are many other factors which contribute to the problem, other than cholesterol.

I did not have an endoscopy when diagnosed for numerous reasons but had sky high blood work. I also weighed in at 97 pounds and from my symptoms, I would venture to guess I had total villous atrophy. Cholesterol screenings, pre-diagnosis, were ridiculously low. Total cholesterol was 129 and my HDL was in the 30's! The minimum they like to see it (HDL) is around 60, so anything above that is in the awesome range. My last check 2 years ago, my cholesterol was a staggering 140 :P and my HDL was up to 60. I hope it is even higher when I am next tested. I pound down the salmon and Omega 3's so here's hoping! :D
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#7 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 03:22 PM

My HDL was 51, my LDL was 133, too high. My total is 200, down from 218 a year before that. I see my doc on Friday, we will be testing this again to see where I am now. 200 is ok, so I didn't worry about it much. It's not my foods causing this, has to be my body.
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Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#8 SGWhiskers

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 05:05 PM

My cholesterol has always been over 200 since I was 17. I was always skinny. Every time I had it checked, one or more of the numbers was in the bad range. Which one seemed to vary. I made attempts to control my cholesterol, but eventually would get lax about it and then the every few years blood draw would tell me to pay attention again. It never topped 220 until the draw that diagnosed Celiac. 239. Six months later, my cholesterol was normal for the first time. I had accidentally dropped 50 points and brough every number into normal ranges. I'm blaming it on the improved liver functioning that came along with the gluten-free diet. My "plan" was to get good at the gluten-free diet over 2 years and then start watching the weight and cholesterol.

Tested negative brother has sky high cholesterol of the bad proportion type.

Not tested mother has mid 200's cholesterol with normal bad cholesterol and excellent good cholesterol.
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#9 momxyz

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 06:13 PM

hate to disagree with y'all but...

like Celiac, tendency to high cholesterol levels tends to be genetic, but, it's not necessarily a trait linked to gluten intolerance. At least, as far as we know now. Someday maybe, there might be a proven connection that comes to light. But, as far as we know now, looking at the matter objectively, there is no proven connection. Genetically speaking.

So, if you have both Celiac and/or gluten intolerance, and high cholesterol... well you just experienced a double bogey in the remix of chromosomes that takes place at conception...yeah go ahead and blame your parents!

My family tends towards high cholesterol numbers. For many years my total was high (230 or greater) but my good cholesterol (HDL) were in the 70's or 80's, and my bad cholesterol (LDL) were within a reasonable range and my triglycerides were low. I have never been overweight. My primary care doctor's comment during my 20's and 30's was... "you can get away with this for now." He commented that he had observed this pattern in many women in this age bracket.

A few years after I crossed the magical line of 40, the total exceeded 245, although the ratios remained similar. It was then that he deemed that I could no longer "get away with it" and he wanted to treat me. He also noted that my TSH levels indicated a slightly hypothyroid state (subclinical hypothyroidism). I asked for - and got - a chance to bring down the numbers with dietary changes. Decrease the fat intake, increase the fiber content, eliminate highly processed foods. My diet was not gluten free, although inadverdently I probably reduced gluten intake, since that's when I began using brown rice as a staple. In six months I was able to reduce my total cholesterol to 190 and my thyroid tests also improved slightly.

Fast forward 7 years, and my daughter is having problems, and I have developed a persistent (like 8 months) itchy rash that is now slowly subsiding as we have both gone on a gluten free diet.

But I still think this is an independent characteristic from our family's high cholesterol. we are just "doubly blessed" if you will.
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#10 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 06:38 PM

http://celiacdisease...SideEffects.htm

Your Cholesterol Levels Will Probably Rise
For the first four decades of my life, while I was still eating gluten, my doctors always told me I had the lowest cholesterol levels they'd ever seen. It retrospect, it's easy to see why -- my intestines weren't absorbing any of the cholesterol in the foods I was eating. Those days are over. Now I have to watch my cholesterol levels along with everyone else. When I check food nutrition labels for the presence of gluten, I also check the fat and cholesterol content. It's very important to choose low-fat, low-cholesterol foods. Packaged gluten-free products are often higher in fat than their gluten-containing counterparts. This is especially true of packaged gluten-free cookies, crackers, and cakes. The American Heart Association points out that foods that are high in soluble fiber have been shown to help lower cholesterol -- so look for beans, peas, rice bran, citrus fruits, strawberries, apple pulp, and gluten-free oats.


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Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#11 mushroom

 
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Posted 25 August 2009 - 09:20 PM

Personally I have always been of the totally?? unfounded opinion that one's cholesterol level does not come about from the foods one consumes (like don't eat egg yolks and that kinda stuff) but on one's overall health and nutrition and the cholesterol one's body naturally produces. So I don't believe in cholesterol-lowering drugs :o If you cut out eggs and fatty meats and butter, but eat trans-fats and potato chips and burgers, well, hail, what have ye done? If you eat the margarine that they recommended for my dad instead of the butter, you just die sooner. I do not believe that your cholesterol levels rise because you eat more cholesterol-containing products. They rise because you are doing something else wrong. So shoot me down, this is just a personal opinion.
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Neroli


"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted." - Albert Einstein

"Life is not weathering the storm; it is learning to dance in the rain"

"Whatever the question, the answer is always chocolate." Nigella Lawson

------------

Caffeine free 1973
Lactose free 1990
(Mis)diagnosed IBS, fibromyalgia '80's and '90's
Diagnosed psoriatic arthritis 2004
Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant, gluten-free Nov. 2007
Soy free March 2008
Nightshade free Feb 2009
Citric acid free June 2009
Potato starch free July 2009
(Totally) corn free Nov. 2009
Legume free March 2010
Now tolerant of lactose

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

#12 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 26 August 2009 - 02:59 AM

I do not believe that your cholesterol levels rise because you eat more cholesterol-containing products. They rise because you are doing something else wrong.


I agree, I think our bodies determine the cholesterol, I to do not think it's necessarily from the foods we eat, not for some of us anyways. I do believe the levels can get out of control, if a person is the out of contol type of eater. We wll know certain foods are not good for us, especially in huge amounts. I do believe if a gluten intolerant person starts to eat a majority of gluten free processed foods, they may run into problems with cholesterol, and weight gain.

Some of us though, do not eat foods which are known to cause a rise in cholesterol. Years ago, I had a neighbor who was only 8, and his cholesterol was off the wall...he had not had time in his life yet to cause that problem.

With the foods I can eat, there is nothing that should cause a rise in my cholesterol levels, yet mine is always borderline high. They say cheese is a big villian, so my levels should go down, I haven't had cheese for months now. We will soon see.
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Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#13 nasalady

 
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Posted 26 August 2009 - 07:12 AM

Intresting. Last cholesterol test I had(been a couple of years), doc said 218. That worried me but he said not to worry. Your HDL is 95- off the charts! I wonder if that's the situation for other celiacs. BTW, that's the only good thing I have going for me!


I too tend to have unusually high HDL levels....this is interesting.

P.S. My cholesterol levels were always the best on the Atkins-type low carb diet....which is pretty close to the paleo diet if you avoid dairy and eat organic/free-range. I definitely ate lots of eggs!
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Multiple autoimmune diseases, including celiac, Hashimoto's, psoriasis, autoimmune hepatitis, RA, SLE. Also have fibromyalgia.

Tested Fall 2008: bloodwork, biopsy negative; HLA DQ8. Doctor believes results negative due to prednisone and Imuran taken for autoimmune hepatitis.

Dx with celiac disease because of dietary response, genetics, and family history of celiac disease.


Dx with Lyme Disease Jan 2010; Lyme likely triggered some of the AI diseases.

Gluten free since 25 Nov 2008

#14 Gemini

 
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Posted 26 August 2009 - 08:58 AM

Personally I have always been of the totally?? unfounded opinion that one's cholesterol level does not come about from the foods one consumes (like don't eat egg yolks and that kinda stuff) but on one's overall health and nutrition and the cholesterol one's body naturally produces. So I don't believe in cholesterol-lowering drugs :o If you cut out eggs and fatty meats and butter, but eat trans-fats and potato chips and burgers, well, hail, what have ye done? If you eat the margarine that they recommended for my dad instead of the butter, you just die sooner. I do not believe that your cholesterol levels rise because you eat more cholesterol-containing products. They rise because you are doing something else wrong. So shoot me down, this is just a personal opinion.


Methinks you make a lot of good sense! ;)

Everyone blames everything on genetics these days and I don't buy into it. I also do not think it normal to lower a 200 pound man's cholesterol levels to 140, via medication and I hear people talking about their levels all the time. People are put on so many meds and most of them are broken down in the liver or pass through, at some point. A healthy liver is crucial to normal cholesterol levels, which vary greatly from person to person. Whats' up with this attitude that one number fits all?

Back at the turn of the century, the consumption of butter was around 18 pounds per person, per year. Heart disease was almost non-existent and not only did people eat butter, there wasn't all this processed food people eat today. Fast forward to the 1970's, when margerine and trans fats became popular and heart disease soared. At that point in time, butter consumption was down to 10 pounds per year, per person. Go figure! Yes, you could say many people died earlier before they had time to develop heart disease but many people lived longer also and did not suffer from what we do today.

I think if you eat animal fats in moderation and smaller amounts than what most people consume today and keep the liver healthy, you'll be fine. A 240 cholesterol level does not necessarily mean you'll develop heart disease. Doctors are clueless about nutrition, in general, and pass on a lot of misinformation.
Exercise is also important and we can see by going to any mall that it's not happening for many people today.
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#15 momxyz

 
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Posted 26 August 2009 - 12:39 PM

http://celiacdisease...SideEffects.htm


this was a good article, thank you. Since reading nutrition labels was already a habit for me, when I was first shopping for gluten free products, one of the first things I noticed was the hi fat content of many of them.... and also that they seemed much more "calorically dense." We are not using that many prepared products - a breakfast cereal, some pasta, and a couple of baking mixes are about it. I have chosen to focus on the things we can prepare at home: moderate servings of meat, fresh fruits and vegetables, brown rice and gluten free oatmeal.
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