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What Is The Difference Between Celiac Disease & Wheat Allergy Symptoms?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Liveenjoylife

 
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Posted 01 September 2009 - 06:43 AM

Is there a significant difference between the two to really pin point whether you have either one?
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#2 The Fluffy Assassin

 
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Posted 01 September 2009 - 05:13 PM

Is there a significant difference between the two to really pin point whether you have either one?

It's not so much the symptoms as the testing. For the former, you see a gastroenterologist and get blood tests (the celiac panel) and a biopsy of the small intestine. The impression one gets around here is that the number of false negatives (you have celiac disease but the tests say you don't) is quite high. For the latter, you see an allergist and get a scratch test, as I understand it. I have the impression that this is much more accurate, but I could be completely wrong. Regardless, the Mayo Clinic says this and this about the symptoms of the two conditions:
http://www.mayoclini...ECTION=symptoms
http://www.mayoclini...ECTION=symptoms
Mainly, celiac disease symptoms are much more varied.
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The fluffy assassin? My cat, Amelia. Just fluffy, really.
About '02, lactose intolerance hit. Quit gluten in late '07. Immediately had better energy, less anxiety.
By '09, no lactose intolerance, but I gave up dairy 7/18/09 anyway (and in August soy). Restarted dairy, Nov' '10; stopped for good, December.
9/12/09 Wound up in the emergency room with what turned out to be hypothyroid symptoms. Resolved quickly when I got my iodine levels up. If you're on a whole foods diet, make sure you get enough iodine. Believe me!
PS: Fluoridation sucks.
PPS: You might enjoy my blog, Writing When The Cat Lets Me.

#3 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 01 September 2009 - 05:57 PM

http://www.foodintol.com/wheat.asp

What is the difference between Wheat Allergy and Wheat Intolerance?
For clarity they are NOT the same thing: Wheat Allergy is a severe sudden onset allergic reaction to a certain protein component of wheat. That is, it's an auto-immune response of the body. Usual symptoms are immediate coughing, asthma, breathing difficulties, and/or projectile vomiting. It can cause life-threatening responses in allergic people. See Anaphylactic responses.

Fortunately, true Wheat allergy is quite rare (less than ½ % of population). These people must observe a strict Wheat-free diet to remain healthy.

HOWEVER, most people who speak of wheat allergy are really referring to Wheat intolerance caused by Gluten - a very complex protein found in wheat and some other grains. It affects one in seven people or 15%.

Wheat Intolerance (Gluten intolerance)
Wheat Intolerance is when you have difficulty digesting wheat, which may seem less important. It is a slower onset but certainly involves the immune system.

Gluten intolerance appears as chronic symptoms like aching joints, gastro-intestinal problems, depression, eczema, low blood iron levels and others.

Wheat intolerance caused by Gluten (contained in Wheat, rye barley and oats) is associated with serious Health Risks like diabetes, bowel cancer, anaemia and osteoporosis.

If you think you might have Wheat or Gluten intolerance you can get proof by doing the Detection Diet - a simple and effective way to find out for sure - no drugs and no therapies.

The treatment is simple - a Gluten-free diet, and people who have suffered for years improve dramatically within a couple of weeks.


I am intolerant of gluten, and my skin seems to be allergic to glutens and other grains. Double whammy. An allergy usually has an instantaneous reaction, and an intolerance is a slower reaction, each very different from the other.
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Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#4 darlindeb25

 
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Posted 04 September 2009 - 04:30 AM

Here's another bit on info, only on the difference between sensitivy and celiac:

http://www.glutenfre...-vs-celiac.html

Dr. Vikki wrote:
What’s the difference between celiac disease and gluten sensitivity?
In my opinion, nothing. The problem we have encountered is that celiac disease is the only manifestation of gluten sensitivity that medicine has been able to diagnose. And not very well at that considering it takes the average celiac patient 11 years before they’re given the proper diagnosis.



Dr. Vikki wrote:
Celiac disease is just a subset of gluten sensitivity. Celiac is just the tip of the iceberg of the greater issue called gluten sensitivity. In this case the tip is 1/40 of the whole iceberg because current research tells us that while celiac disease affects 1% of the population, gluten sensitivity’s incidence is about 40%. And that takes it right out of the “rare” category and puts it squarely in the category of obesity which is considered to be an epidemic!




Dr. Vikki wrote:
Diagnosis: The “gold standard” for diagnosing celiac disease is a positive intestinal biopsy revealing severe degradation of the surface of the small intestine. Damage has to occur for many years before such a test is positive, not to mention all the secondary problems that have likely arisen during that time. Yet we wait and wait for that positive test while in the meantime it’s considered perfectly fine to tell a patient to continue eating gluten if their test is negative.




Makes sense to me. It's nice to see some validation from the medical profession.
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Deb
Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

#5 nora_n

 
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Posted 04 September 2009 - 12:19 PM

Allergies are IgE mediated, celiac IgA.

with celiac, there are vitamin and mineral deficiencies due to malabsorption. Not with wheat allergy.
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gluten-free since may 06 after neg. biopsy symptoms went away and DH symptoms which I had since 03 got gradually better.
daughter officially diagnosed celiac and casein intolerant.
non-DQ2 or DQ8. Maybe DQ1? Updated: Yes, double DQ5
Hypothyroid since 2000, thyroxine first started to work well 06 on a low-carb and gluten-free diet
Lost 20 kg after going gluten-free and weighing 53 kg now. neg. biopsy for DH. Found out afterwards from this forum that it should have been taken during an outbreak but it was taken two weeks after. vitaminD was 57 nmol/l in may08)




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