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Half Moons On Fingernails


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#1 Guest_gfinnebraska_*

 
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Posted 26 April 2005 - 11:48 AM

I was reading a post yesterday and someone mentioned that IF you are lacking in B-12 you won't have half moons on your fingernails. Hmmm... SO, I looked down and I don't have ANY moons at all!!! Do most of you take B-12?? What does a lack in B-12 do other than the fingernail thing??? Yes, I am headed to the store after work and picking up some, but I was just curious the effects of a low B vitamin diet. Thank you!!
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#2 KaitiUSA

 
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Posted 26 April 2005 - 11:57 AM

Yes I heard that too...I have moons on 7 or 8 of my fingers but it should be on all 10...I take sublingual B12 as well as a B complex vitamin and liquid vitamins.


I was sent an email by Deb a while ago and this is what it said:

Good vitamin B12 levels give you white moons on all
your fingers; the thumbs' are the last to go. (Tessa
Jupp, R.N., active in the Post-Polio Network, Dec.
2001)

If your moons have disappeared, you may have been
short of vitamin B12 for a long time. If so, you may
notice other symptoms of B12 Malabsorption Illness:
tingling hands and feet
numbness
memory problems
feeling exhausted
depression
sensitivity to noise
hundreds of brown spots
bleeding gums
burning sensation (possibly on thighs)
your legs jump at night
bone pain
balance and gait problems
heavy menstrual bleeding
diarrhea

Before your moons disappear, lines develop on your
nails. These can be faint, to very visible ridges like
fine wax drippings on a Chianti bottle -- lines on top
of lines, like hog back hills. To see them clearly, use
a magnifying glass or even reading glasses.

If you have faint lines, no more noticeable than the
tassels on the wheat in the image to the left, then run
through the barbed issues above, looking for ones
that apply to you. If three or four do, then be
warned that the others may be only a few years
away. If, that is, you do nothing.

Blue skin under your fingernails indicates that you
may be short of red blood cells and by extension,
the oxygen they carry.
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Kaiti
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#3 Guest_gfinnebraska_*

 
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Posted 26 April 2005 - 11:59 AM

OH MY!!! I have SO many of those other symptoms!!! Yikes!! I had better get on some B-12 ASAP!! Thank you Kaiti!!! Wow... who knew???!! I am COVERED with brown spots. Thought I was just getting age spots early!! Thank you SO much... :o :D :o
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#4 stef_the_kicking_cuty

 
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Posted 26 April 2005 - 01:16 PM

I found something about Vitamin B-12 on a german website. I tried to translate the most important stuff:
Vitamin B-12, also called cobalamine, is like folic acid there to help building the bloodcells. A lack of vitamin B-12 leads to the socalled pernicious anemia, where the bloodcells aren't completely build. Before the blood picture gets abnormal a little lack of vitamin B-12 shows through weakness, change in moods, light depression, lack of memory, flagging muscular system and athetosis.

Vitamin B-12 helps to transform the beta-carotine into vitamin A for the eyes.

Vitamin B-12 is very important for the metabolism.

Because every human has a lot of vitamin B-12 in the body and doesn't need THAT much it takes 3 to 6 years until the first "lack of vitamin B-12"-symptoms appear. Because 60% of all vitamin B-12 (2 to 5 mg) can be found in the liver (30% are in the muscular system, the other 10% in the renals, heart, spleen and brain), alcoholics and people with liverproblems/diseases are the first to be affected by symptoms due to lack of vitamin B-12. Also women in pregnancy and nursing (especially vegetarians), people with malabsorption (celiac disease), diabetes, people with severe thyroid problems, as well as breast-fed children of vegetarians and persons, that are older than 60, can suffer from lack of vitamin B-12.

There are different medications that can dicrease the absorption of vitamin B-12 into the metabolism. Pektin (I do not know the english name, sorry), a natural gelling agent in appels, makes it difficult for the body to get vitamin B-12, as well as sugar, candies/sweets, sweet beverages and laxatives. It's easier for the body to get vitamin B-12, when you eat foods reach in calcium like herbs or milk products. Vitamin B-12 is in liver, renals, oysters, crabs, herrings, mackerels, sardines, trouts, eels, meat and milk products. The only reason mussels and shellfishes have Vitamin B-12 is, because they eat microorganisms that are rich in vitamen B-12. The human body can partly build vitamin B-12 in the intestines with the help of coli-bacterias. But you need healthy intestines for this. Even with beer (yeast), which mostly men consume too much, you can satisfy the needs of vitamins up to 11%.

Well, there was a lot more to this text, but I couldn't translate everything. This is quite interesting, though.
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#5 skbird

 
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Posted 26 April 2005 - 01:43 PM

I can't remember if I've posted this before but what finally convinced me to take B12, besides reading that folks like us are often deficient, was reading this page from the Merck Manual.

Normal Laboratory Values - Merck Manual

I had had a comprehensive metabolic panel done three times in less than a year as my doctor was trying to track my too-high cholesterol (before finding out about the gluten probelm) and I noticed my "alk phosphotase" was below normal values each time, in fact getting lower each time. I asked what that meant, he said don't worry unless it's high. Well, after reading the Merck Manual page above, I found that this low level is indicative of pernicious anemia. THEN I learned about the ridged fingernails, depression, lack of energy, etc. Totally me. I hadn't read before that sensitivity to sound was a symptom but I am hypersensitive to all sounds and often wish I would just go deaf. I'm totally serious (OK I would probably be unhappy about that but it does get to me - I wear ear plugs most of the time I'm at home and even used to at work sometimes!!!)

My levels of alk phosphotase were: 34, 30, and 25. Normal is 38-126, according to this lab. I haven't had my B12 levels tested and by the time I get around to seeing the doctor again and requesting such a test they may be pretty normal as I am diligently taking my B12 now, as well as B6 (something I was also low in, as my ALT and AST levels were on the lowest possible number in the healthy range - indicating B6 deficiency). Anyway, I find this really interesting, being able to finally translate lab values and wonder why doctors just don't care about that end of things - the stuff that can be treated with vitamins, but could indicate something much worse. That is very frustrating to me!

Anyway, thanks for the info...

Stephanie

PS I have strong moons on my thumbs, sort of moons on both index fingers, and a hint of on one of my middle fingers. Also lots of ridges and a split in my thumbnail that grew with my nail for 3 years until I went low carb/low gluten, and then it went away...
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#6 mytummyhurts

 
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Posted 26 April 2005 - 04:00 PM

I am B12 deficient too. My doctor has me getting shots to get me back up to regular levels. Maybe you should ask your doctor for shots. They will probably want to do a blood test first to see how deficient you are. That's a faster way to get it back into your system. I don't have any moons on my fingernails. But I don't remember ever having them before either. I do have lots of ridges. And problems with nerves.
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#7 Guest_gfinnebraska_*

 
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Posted 27 April 2005 - 05:36 AM

Thank you for all the replies! I went last night and bought a B-12 and also a B complex to take. I was told that liquid B-12 absorbs better, so next time I am in a large city I will hunt for that! :) Hopefully my levels will return to normal soon!! I can not believe how long it takes to "discover" all these things that are wrong with my body. Sigh... THAT is why I always read this site ~ I feel like I learn something every single day!!! Thank you all ... :D
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#8 beelzebubble

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 01:00 AM

whoa. this post hit me like a load of bricks. i've been wondering why i only have half moons on my thumbs. i seem to remember having half moons on my fingers at some point :).

when you said lines on your fingernails, do you mean raised ridges that follow the growth of the nail? i developed those a couple of years ago. hmmm...what else can you tell us about this?

i've made a few posts about my energy/stress issues, but here's a quick recap:

tired all the time
depression/anxiety
easy startling
crying when startled
inability to deal with stress (feelings of being overwhelmed and wanting to cry or hide)
weakness
etc...

this may sound odd, but these things don't feel psychological. they feel chemical, or hormonal. my rational mind knows the the depression/anxiety/stress reactions are silly, i just can't convince my body of that.

anyway, this might make some sense, especially since both my grandfather and my sister have pernicious anemia.
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#9 plantime

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 09:15 AM

OK, time for a seemingly stupid question: what are moons on the fingernails? My fingers have always been purply-blue under the nails, and I have always had ridges running lenthwise. They are not brittle, nor do they break easily. I do have problems with pernicious anemia, and require Bcomplex and iron supplements.
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#10 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 11:31 AM

The moons under your fingernails (the white, semicircular bit of the nail bed at the cuticle) also "receed" as we get older, naturally.
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
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#11 uclangel422

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 12:33 PM

I have never paid this much attention to my nails before. I also only have them on my thumbs and am sure that i have had them before. Very strange, must put that on the list for the doctor.
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#12 skbird

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 01:10 PM

Could it be that the moons recede as we get older because as people get older, they become naturally deficient in B12? Just curious. Also, my husband is 17 years older than me, he is 50, and he has moons on all of his fingernails, really distinct ones, while I don't. BUT he does have really ridged nails as well. Either he's an exception to the rule or -- I don't know what he is! :P

Anyway, I have been looking for info on the web about moons and B12 deficiency and can't find anything. I can find though that if you have certain kinds of lung disease that this can be the reason you lose the moons, or lunulas, as they are called.

Stephanie
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Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
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#13 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 01:30 PM

Well, genetics plays an important role as well! :-)
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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
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#14 lotusgem

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 03:40 PM

So are you guys saying that there is a connection between B-12 deficiency and anxiety disorders? I have had major difficulty with depression and anxiety throughout most of my life. It's gotten much better in recent years, but I totally hear you, Beezlebubble! I hate it when someone sneaks up on me "for fun" to surprise me. I am soooo easily startled and it's really unsettling and irritating. It takes nothing, and my anti-perspirant has failed me. My husband and I came to the conclusion that I am much more reactive than the average Joe. He laughs and says that I must have been a rabbit or squirrel in a previous life, because of how easily I'm startled. :o It's frustrating, because I don't think of myself as being a weak person, or lacking courage;it's more of a sensory thing.
Remember that, Beezlebubble...YOU are not weak. It's got to be physical, and I'm sure that it will ease up as we become better nourished on the gluten-free diet.
May you be well, may you be happy! (A Buddhist prayer.)
Paula
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#15 cdford

 
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Posted 03 May 2005 - 10:28 PM

I knew I had been slacking off on my B shots because I hate those needles, but I did not realize how badly until I read this post and took a good look at my nails. I guess I get to take a shot tonight. Yuck.
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Donna
South Georgia
9 yrs gluten-free
...also DH, fibromyalgia, neuropathy, osteopenia, hypothyroid...

After almost 10 years, I am doing soooo much better!




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