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Anyone Have Problems With Quinoa?
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ive been eating Quinoa like crazy since going gluten-free - its my salvation. however lately I find that Im having difficulty digesting it and is causing constipation. is it possible i developed a sensitivity to it? my diet is so restricted and the thought of having to cut out more stuff that i like is scary

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I eat quinoa as an alternative carbohydrate source a couple of times a month. I do not have any trouble eating it. It is possible that you are intolerant to it, but I have not known of anybody with a quinoa intolerance. An allergy is also possible.

I prepare it by rinsing the grain to ensure that all of the naturally occurring saporin is removed, and then add 1 part quinoa to 2 parts liquid. Bring to a boil and them simmer covered for 15 minutes. Cook it more if in doubt--don't under cook it. The grains should look like they are sprouting when done.

The liquid can be almost anything. You can use plain water, or some combination of water with wine, broth, gluten-free soy sauce or other seasonings. Add salt and/or spices as desired.

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It's possible that it's bothering you simply because you're eating too much of it. Try rotating it with other grains like rice, buckwheat, millet, amaranth etc.

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Jason, if you eat anything in great quantity you are likely to become intolerant of it, especially carbs.

You are constantly trying to 'replace' the carbs with other carbs and it is carbs that are the problem. It won't work. The bugs just adapt to your new and latest carb substitute and the cycle starts all over again.

I see this over and over again. People dump the gluten and eat corn, then become intolerant of the corn so they eat soy products and become intolerant of that and so it goes on - and on.

Your body won't heal while you keep the damage going. I can tell from your constant posts that you are fighting this all the way and you won't win until you get a 'handle' on it.

You don't need the carbs. The mono-saccharide carbs in vegetables and some fruit will be quite enough to keep your body's needs going. If necessary, as long as you eat enough protein it can convert some of that to glucogen.

Your body's energy needs can be met through fats which are far more efficient fuel sources and far more sustainable than carbs anyway.

You only have to look at the energy and vibrance of people like Jason Vale (the juicemaster) to see that you don't need the carbs.

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I eat quinoa with no problems, but I don't eat it that often. I think the advice to switch out and reduce your carbs is a good idea. I don't eat the same carbs even 2 days in a row, although I dug up a huge potatoe crop, so this presents a problem, as I love potatoes, and am notoriously cheap!

I see from other posts that you have a problem with your job (traveling). My husband was in sales and was home most nights. He had to travel a little for coventions and stuff, but not a whole lot. He went to Hawaii once. Maybe you could get a sales job like that. It's not as exciting, but you wouldn't be starving or sick so much! At least untill you get more of a handle on how to manuever through this desease and build your health back up.

Ask for and take the advice of other travelors on the board. Sure hope you find your way.

Susan

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ive been eating Quinoa like crazy since going gluten-free - its my salvation. however lately I find that Im having difficulty digesting it and is causing constipation. is it possible i developed a sensitivity to it? my diet is so restricted and the thought of having to cut out more stuff that i like is scary

Absolutely!! I'm on the SCD diet and found that I was not the only one. Quinoa is 60% starch and some of us can not break it down. It's all explained on the SCD pages. You might want to browse the online pages at www.scdiet.com or www.pecanbread.com and see if it sounds like you. It's work but do you have a choice? It takes a good attitude and determination regardless of what you do in life, right?

I started out with the celiac diagnosis and then IBD and then leaky gut and so on.......Sometimes things are very complex. Go with your gut. haha?? I've found a lot of freedom with the SCD diet. I am able to see what I 'can' have instead of what I can't. I'm 7 weeks in and still on stage 3, but I'm feeling well enough to get out of the house now and then..........finally, after 10 months of being bedridden. So, don't give up. I hope you're doing better.

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Jason, if you look at this thread again, just to say that one thing you could try would be to drink more water.

As I have mentioned on another thread, I have come to realise that a lot of the reason why we are having so many issues is because of extreme dehydration. We don't realise we are dehydrated - we think we are drinking enough, but in reality we are drinking liquids that are also dehydrating - tea, coffee, squash, juice, coke, soda, alcohol, etc. What the body needs is water, and that is what it rarely gets.

If what we are drinking needs at least half its water content to digest itself then gradually we become more and more dehydrated and end up in a hydration deficit. Add to that the carbs which are also dehydrating and it is no wonder our bodies can't cope with it. You know those sweet sugary drinks that leave you feeling thirsty..........? They have taken more water from your body than they have given you.

The basis of virtually all the metabolic processes in the body is water, without enough those processes start to break down. The basis of stomach acid and digestive juices is water. The basis of bicarbonates is water. The basis of digestive tract motility - is water. If the body doesn't have enough water to do these processes we can't digest our food properly.

This is a gradual deficit, started in infancy with the introduction of sugary drinks, candies, biscuits, et al but that deficit will hit us with health issues at some point sooner or later. Robert Lustig, an eminent pediatrician said that he is seeing 6 month-old babies in his clinic with obesity! No wonder childhood diabetes is on the increase. High-fructose corn syrup is in virtually everything processed.

Double whammy. We are eating and drinking more food that is dehydrating, yet drinking less and less pure water.

You need to drink about half your lbs weight in fluid ounces, i.e. 180lbs = 90 fl oz (about 2.5 liters). You will also need to take a little salt to replace the electrolytes. It must be real unrefined rock or sea salt, not the cheapo table salt (only sodium chloride) which does not contain the many balanced minerals and trace elements that real salt does. A quarter to half a teaspoon per day is usually enough.

You can carry water with you on your travels and request it in restaurants and bars. It might be an idea to put a container of rock salt in your car to use on your food when you are out in case the restaurant only has the cheap stuff!

This you can do easily. It may not be an instant fix, but hopefully within a week or two you would start to see a difference. I have seen lots of testimonials and experiences of people who have recovered from all sorts of things by doing this. It won't hurt to try and makes so much sense. I just wish I'd figured it out earlier.

I would say to anyone thinking of it - be careful with this protocol if you have any kidney problems.

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I don't feel bad if I eat quinoa, but I don't eat it because it is totally undigested in my stool. I figure that means I'm not absorbing it for some reason or another. Thusly, I avoid it.

Millet is good - though I think it might cause me to itch. Corn is of course an option if you're not allergic - you can try polenta (closest way I can think of it make it like quinoa). Amaranth is good, but good is a relative term. I used to eat it for breakfast. I now eat lower fat, so don't eat.

Are you getting enough fats? and enough liquids? And is your fiber mostly soluable? Those would be the things I would check about constipation. I'm a life long sufferer - and even now gluten-free for 2 years (3 years?) I still get bouts of it, from this or that I virtually never figure out. One thing I KNOW causes it is dairy.

Anyway, good luck.

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I eat it for dinner 1-2x a week, and only about a 1/2 cup cooked. I also soak it for 1-2 hours, even though the box says pre-rinsed. Have no problems with it.

I did have major problems with quinoa I bought from the bulk-bin, however (likely cc issues).

I have read that some people develop a problem with Quinoa, and considering it's a new food to me genetically (since none of my past relatives would have eaten it), I am keeping to small amounts occasionally.

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I have recently figured out that too much of any food besides meat and veggies is not a good thing. It overloads our already damaged, sensitive systems! I have reacted to quinoa in the past and now I eat it maybe 1x a week and handle it fine. I recently experienced this over the holidays when I baked everything with honey, agave and maple syrup(all fructose). Healthy...right? NO NO NO!!! I once again over did it and payed for about a week! MODERATION is key. I agree with the post about water, too. The more I drink, the better my bowels move. I was thinking it was quinoa too a few months ago. I may have even asked the same question somewhere on here. Its not the food itself, just TOO much of it. Your fine just cut down! Take it from me!

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