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Vegetarian & Celiac
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Hello everyone, my name's Emma.

I'm 15 years old and in about May of this year I started getting a rash when I ate the majority of foods (the noted ones being bread and noodles :P). I work in a pet shop and so I see many dogs with intolerances to gluten so this was one of the first things that came to mind.

I've been a vegetarian since I was about 4 and so far this had never caused any problems, my diet had been healthy enough but I was really dependent on pasta, noodles and that sort of food.

I haven't been diagnosed with celiac disease, because I'm literally terrified of needles, but basically when I don't eat gluten I don't have a rash, when I do eat it I get a rash, so you get the point.

The doctor won't refer me to a dietician because I won't get bloods done, regardless of the fact that research I have done says that these tests are sometimes inconclusive.

To be honest I'm finding it very difficult to stick to what I'm allowed and sometimes I'll see a really nice looking piece of proper bread or something and eat it :(. The gluten free bread is horrible.

It's leaving me very weak and I'm picking up every illness going round, at the minute I'm lying in bed with a tummy bug. I'm missing a lot of school because of it :(.

So does anyone have any advice on coping with it? And should I be taking supplements or anything?

Emma.

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There are some wonderful gluten-free pastas on the market. Go to Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, Better Health stores and look. Many are rice flour based and some are corn or quinoa based. I have several other trigger foods like beans, rice and eggs that make alot of vegetarian options that are available not possible choices for me. I think most of us go thru the emotions of feeling "limited". It's also a huge learning curve because you will find glutens in the weirdest places! Start reading your ingredient lists religiously! You can often get "glutened" and not realize how till you become more familiar with brands and what kinds of foods are hidden time-bombs for us!! Good luck, Sweetie!

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someplace there is a vegeiac web site which I cant find just now. they have a lot of recipes too.

try some differnet indian foods - (im working in south india right now)

grteat stuff and all safe

]

Hello everyone, my name's Emma.

I'm 15 years old and in about May of this year I started getting a rash when I ate the majority of foods (the noted ones being bread and noodles :P). I work in a pet shop and so I see many dogs with intolerances to gluten so this was one of the first things that came to mind.

I've been a vegetarian since I was about 4 and so far this had never caused any problems, my diet had been healthy enough but I was really dependent on pasta, noodles and that sort of food.

I haven't been diagnosed with celiac disease, because I'm literally terrified of needles, but basically when I don't eat gluten I don't have a rash, when I do eat it I get a rash, so you get the point.

The doctor won't refer me to a dietician because I won't get bloods done, regardless of the fact that research I have done says that these tests are sometimes inconclusive.

To be honest I'm finding it very difficult to stick to what I'm allowed and sometimes I'll see a really nice looking piece of proper bread or something and eat it :(. The gluten free bread is horrible.

It's leaving me very weak and I'm picking up every illness going round, at the minute I'm lying in bed with a tummy bug. I'm missing a lot of school because of it :(.

So does anyone have any advice on coping with it? And should I be taking supplements or anything?

Emma.

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I have found gluten free pasta and spaghetti, but it all clumps together during cooking. Any suggestions?

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I'm somewhat of the opinion that foods in their whole and natural form are the way to go, though I suppose with things like peanut butter and yogurt it's somewhat debatable. I would look into a book called Nourishing Traditions, which has a lot of good recipes and information, but the biggest thing is that you should soak your grains before eating them to eliminate the inhibiting factors that prevent us from absorbing all the nutrients.

That being said, when I was eating non-gluten grains I used a rice cooker to make rice, quinoa and buckwheat. It was phenomenal, doesn't take much longer to cook than pasta and you get good grains that you know have been prepared properly (soaked) because you did it yourself!

Good luck,

-Jesse

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a little more salt in the water and stir lightly the whole time

also dont put them in the water until its fully boiling.

usually it does not take as long to cook as the package says --

in fact i found that true for almost all gluten-free noodles.

good luck

I have found gluten free pasta and spaghetti, but it all clumps together during cooking. Any suggestions?
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a little more salt in the water and stir lightly the whole time

also dont put them in the water until its fully boiling.

usually it does not take as long to cook as the package says --

in fact i found that true for almost all gluten-free noodles.

good luck

Hi Emma! I eat a lot of pasta also, and I have noticed that the rice based gluten free pastas do tend to clump together when I am cooking them. I recently switched to the corn based gluten free pastas and I have not noticed that issue. As previously stated, I do stir pretty much the whole time they are cooking to make sure they don't stick together or to the bottom. That seems to work. Plus, I think the corn pasta actually tastes better and has a better texture than the rice based pasta (just my opinion though).

With bread, I agree with you that gluten free bread is simply just not very good!! What I have started to do, though, is instead of buying the loaves of gluten free bread, I just buy Kinnickick (spelling??) gluten free hamburger buns. They are in the freezer section and you can just keep them frozen in your freezer at home until you are ready to use them. Then you just thaw them out in the microwave for about a minute. I think they taste MUCH better than the other gluten free bread. The bread doesn't crumble when you eat it and it is much more substantial. That's how I make all my sandwiches and grilled cheeses now!

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Thanks for the tips :) .

We are in Ireland so a lot of the products I have seen on here aren't available. But I will look out for that frozen bread stuff.

We've got a rice cooker so I'm eating a lot of rice too!

And a bread maker but we are yet to work out how to switch it on :rolleyes:

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I know that this is a hard time at this point however just remember that it will get better. I hated going gluten free in the beginning and now (even after eliminating other items such as olives, cheese, milk, meat etc.) I feel that I'd rather not eat those foods than suffer through the pain that comes after eating them. I agree with the entry that said food in its natural state is the best.

Whole Foods Market and Trader Joes (If you live in the US) both carry gluten free pastas. As mentioned earlier stir them as they cook. Corn pasta I haven't tried, but quinoa pasta is one that I have that I've found amazing. It won't stick together as much, again, as long as you're stirring. If you want noodles try rice noodles. They only need to boil about 5 minutes until they are done and then all you have to do is put them in soup or buy cheap cans of already made gluten free pasta sauce.

Good Luck!

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someplace there is a vegeiac web site which I cant find just now. they have a lot of recipes too.

try some differnet indian foods - (im working in south india right now)

grteat stuff and all safe

,

Hi Ken I think this is the one you meant.

Below is an Active link.

.

Vegiac.Com Forum

.

Best Regards,

David

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I have found gluten free pasta and spaghetti, but it all clumps together during cooking. Any suggestions?

Do you know which brand you use? My entire family (Me, my mom and sister) have celiac disease and of course eat gluten free. We use a brand called tinkyada. Its amazing. Never had a problem with it. My mom cooks the same thing for everyone when we have people over and my friends can't even tell the difference

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Thanks for the tips :) .

We are in Ireland so a lot of the products I have seen on here aren't available. But I will look out for that frozen bread stuff.

We've got a rice cooker so I'm eating a lot of rice too!

And a bread maker but we are yet to work out how to switch it on :rolleyes:

Try ordering things offline. Tons of websites such as the gluten free mall have multiple brands. I like Pamela's bread mix. The bread is amazing to eat just with butter but I wouldn't use it for sandwiches.

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Thanks David!

thats the one -- thought she might be interested in it!

take care

,

Hi Ken I think this is the one you meant.

Below is an Active link.

.

Vegiac.Com Forum

.

Best Regards,

David

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Salad is very delicious. Okay, I don't think so, but I hate lettuce. Just avoid the croutons and check the ingredients on the dressing and you should be fine. Rice noodles or just rice for starch. Also, my sister makes a wonderful vegetarian chili that is completely gluten free. Eat peanuts and beans to keep getting protein. Also, learn to bake your own bread. Trust me, the gluten free bread products will be ten times more delicious if you bake it yourself.

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Hi. I am a vegetarian too and like you, do not have an actual confirmed diagnoses. My results were inconclusive, but I know that I am gluten and lactose intolerant. If I have the slightest miniscule amount of gluten I am sick for at least 12 hours.

I am pretty new to this, but so far I have been eating a lot of fruit, vegetables, beans, quinoa, dried fruit, larabars, soup, salad, applesauce, sweet potatoes, popcorn and rice chex (there are many flavors) with vanilla soy milk. I have tried some specialty things and am still discovering what is good and whats not. I had AMY's gluten free pizza last night for the first time and it was good, but different....It reminded me more of spinach dip on a polenta cookieish thing then it did pizza. I really like pasta made from corn and quinoa, but like others noted, you need to stir it continuously because it clumps. You just have to experiment and try different things. The hardest part is being out with friends. I suggest searching for restaurants with gluten free menus like olive garden (they have gluten free pasta), P.F. changs, Claim jumper ect and when your friends or family want to go out to a restaurant you can suggest a restaurant you know you can find something to eat at. I'm sure you will find plenty to eat, I know I have. Best wishes

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Hello everyone, my name's Emma.

I'm 15 years old and in about May of this year I started getting a rash when I ate the majority of foods (the noted ones being bread and noodles :P). I work in a pet shop and so I see many dogs with intolerances to gluten so this was one of the first things that came to mind.

I've been a vegetarian since I was about 4 and so far this had never caused any problems, my diet had been healthy enough but I was really dependent on pasta, noodles and that sort of food.

I haven't been diagnosed with celiac disease, because I'm literally terrified of needles, but basically when I don't eat gluten I don't have a rash, when I do eat it I get a rash, so you get the point.

The doctor won't refer me to a dietician because I won't get bloods done, regardless of the fact that research I have done says that these tests are sometimes inconclusive.

To be honest I'm finding it very difficult to stick to what I'm allowed and sometimes I'll see a really nice looking piece of proper bread or something and eat it :(. The gluten free bread is horrible.

It's leaving me very weak and I'm picking up every illness going round, at the minute I'm lying in bed with a tummy bug. I'm missing a lot of school because of it :(.

So does anyone have any advice on coping with it? And should I be taking supplements or anything?

Emma.

Oh, I am actually vegan. I have been a celiac since I've been in 5th grade. But I have been diagnosed just about 2 weeks ago. And don't be scared about the needles. Believe me, its either get one needle now or hundreds as your life goes on. There was plenty of time when I ended up in the emergency room due to my abdominal pain. The best thing you should do is just get the tests done. I actually needed to get put to sleep and get a sample of my intestine. I'm not sure why they had me do that instead of a blood test. But I would have highly preferred that way more. I am finding it difficult to maintain the celiac diet as well. There's always some fresh bread at my house. Or some kind of dessert laying around that I am dying to eat. But trust me, in about a week or so, you will feel SOO much better. So much healthier. Oh and for vitamins, I just take a miltivitamin. And a joint vitamin, but thats for a different purpose haha. Feel free to message me if you would like to know me or anything. I'm always researching! Goodluck!! :D

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So I hope I'm replying to this right.

I'm seventeen and found out I was diagnosed with celiac disease in December of 2007.

I was previously a vegetarian for about three months before I was diagnosed.

I, unlike you, don't have a problem with needles, and at the same time I found out I had a gluten intolerance found out I have a dairy ALLERGY.

So I kinda went from being just a vegetarian to a vegan without gluten.

Don't get discouraged, I know it's hard to find things to eat, especially if your like me and have no cooking skills whatsoever, but you can work around that.

I'm not sure how much of a vegetable fan you are, but I pretty much only eat them.

I go through different phases of what I eat.

Some of my favorites are:

-Bean tacos: Which I make the shell with a corn tortilla, with pinto beans, and smetimes I throw in salsa and all the stuff you like on a taco. I make this corn salsa with just defrosted frozen corn, diced up purple onions, lemon juice and parsley I think just all mixed up and that's really good on the tacos.

-BBQ: This is probably my favorite, and now my whole family asks me to make it for them, I pretty much grill pineapples, brown onions, potatoes, and mushrooms with olive oil and Sweet Baby Rays BBQ sauce, in one of those vegetable griller pan things with the wholes in it, sorry I don't know what the name is.

-Salads are always a good thing, especially if you switch it up with like different letuces and dressings, maybe try it with fruit really changes them so your not having the same boring salad.

DON'T FORGET:

-Avoid crutons.

-Check the lables and look them up. All Kraft products will list barley if theres any in them.

-Check the brand of the pinto beans, you never know what's safe or what's not.

If you have any questions or want to talk about anything feel free.

My email is:

brii_1992@yahoo.com

I hope I helped some.

Don't get discouraged, try just googling things.

Also, bread wise, Pamalas gluten free bread mix cooked in a bread maker is THEE BEST and super easy to make!

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OK so i luv 2 play matchmaker w/ relationships, n friends. i jus wanted 2 reccomend u 2 another vegetarian celaic, whose username is "gfteen" u might want 2 contact her/him, if ur interested.

(also there is a DELICOUS bread that tastes sum like the real thing, by the brand "Udi's")

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I have found gluten free pasta and spaghetti, but it all clumps together during cooking. Any suggestions?

Did you try Quinoa based pasta? That tends to work for me.

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I have Celiac disease and eat a vegan diet. Feel free to message or email me any time, d.hoholuk@hotmail.com I also have a blog and post recipes daily, if you are interested.

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Schar brand stuff in Europe tends to be pretty good (I look for it in the US).

One of the major tricks with going gluten free while veg is getting enough protein and iron and not too many refined carbs. It's harder to do if you eat lots of packaged foods, so having a rice cooker and cooking at home is great! So, try to find whole grains (brown rice instead of white, millet, quinoa, wild rice, etc) and be careful to eat grains with sources of complementary protein. Basically, eat from different food groups at the same time.

Examples: corn and beans, rice and lentils, anything and egg or dairy (if you can digest it), grains and nuts, soy and grains, etc.

I like Mexican and Indian food as general cuisines that are very friendly to gluten-free diets. East Asian is good too, but you have to be very careful of soy sauce as most of it has wheat in it so I usually make it at home. Tossing grains, beans, and vegetables in a vinaigrette is a nice way to make a simple main dish that's basically a "one-pot" meal. Feel free to PM me or post up more specific foods that you like for actual recipes. I grew up vegetarian, and my mom is too so it's my default way of cooking.

You might want to take a multivitamin or multimineral. Be sure to get one that is gluten-free. Teenage girls (I think?) are especially as risk of iron deficiency, and when you add in potential malabsorption...

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It must be hard being vegetarian as well. From time to time, I have considered it however I find I need as much protein as I can get so vego is a no-no for me :angry:

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Have you tried quinoa? It's a really good vegetarian option because it's very high in protein. I also eat spaghetti squash instead of pasta - add some sauce and cheese and it tastes like the real thing (with a slightly different texture), and it's a vegetable! And if you enjoy baking at all, you should try making your own bread. I just attempted my first loaf, and it came out very fresh and er, bread-like. Much more like real bread than the frozen commercial loafs.

Good luck! You can do it! :)

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Toast or grill the gluten free bread to make it more palatable!

I would also look into to mid-Eastern foods. Some of the spices are good for digesting and soothe the tummy. Hummus has been great for adding some protein into vegan diet. We don't have to be completely vegan anymore so I have forgotten some of my suggestions. I love The Allergen- Free Baker's handbook HOw to Bake without Gluten, Wheat, Dairy, Egss, Soy, Peanuts, Tree nuts, and Sesame by Cybele Pascal. I do hope you can get a copy. It might be hard to use an American cookbook but there are conversion charts on-line to use.

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If your cycle is not consistent, I would highly recommend you eliminate soy products unless they're fermented. I'm not sure how much you consume but it's estrogenic and can wreak havoc on your hormones. A healthier alternative would be to eat beans, legumes, nuts, seeds, etc. I eat a lot of these types of foods and prefer them to meat any day. I also really like pea protein...it's easily to digest and has all the amino acids. I was a vegan for nearly a decade and throughout my late teens. Now I tend to eat animal protein light and hope to go back to being a vegetarian soon. Be sure to take iron...liquid iron like florix (sp?) is really good and easily assimilated.

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