Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


- - - - -

Flour Substitute


  • Please log in to reply

17 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_LuvtoLaff06_*

 
Guest_LuvtoLaff06_*
  • Guests
 

Posted 04 January 2004 - 05:09 PM

Is there a good flour substitute I could use for breads (white) and biscuits? Something I can just sub for regular flour in all my recipes without having to also use other ingredients like tapioca, xanthum, etc.
  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 tarnalberry

 
tarnalberry

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,542 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2004 - 07:38 PM

While others may be more useful, my limited gluten-free baking experience says "no". Because there's no flour that has the protein content or fat content properties that wheat does. Because no gluten-free flour has gluten, which makes wheat act the way it does - texture wise and performance wise. Bette Hageman's cookbooks have the best discussion about flour subsitutions so far. For some things, like cookies, you can get away with simple subsitutions, but it's very limited. (Though, I should add, if you don't have a problem with oats - and I know that's controversial - and have a source of uncontaminated oat flour (like grinding McCann's), a number of recipes (quick breads, particularly) you can directly subsitute oat flour for wheat flour. (Works for oatmeal cookies too.) )

Tiffany
  • 0
Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy
G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004
Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me
Bellevue, WA

#3 kejohe

 
kejohe

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2004 - 07:39 PM

Unfortunately, there are no substitutes that will work straight across the board for regular wheat flour, at least none that I know of. Rice flour is the most widely used in combination with the xanthan gum, but you often get better results using a combination of several flours.

My best suggestion is to mix your own flous and store them ready to use. For instance, Bette Hagman's featherlight mix works very well for most cookies, it's a combo of rice, tapioca and potato flour. I mix mine about 10# at a time and that lasts me a while. Then just use the amount called for in a standard recipe and add about 1 tsp xanthan gum depending on the recipe. It saves tons of time and saves pantry space instead of having 12 different containers of misc flours all over.

Hope this helps a little and good luck,
Kathleen
  • 0

#4 angel_jd1

 
angel_jd1

    Gluten Free Goddess

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,053 posts
 

Posted 04 January 2004 - 08:14 PM

Tiffany is right....the gluten part of wheat flour is what makes it "Stickey" and what makes it fluffy when you bake . That is why when you are baking gluten free goodies, you have to use the xantham gum or garr gumm.flours like tapioca and rice have their own stickey substances that help hold baked good together. Hope that info helps!!
-Jessica :P
  • 0
Jessica
Gluten Free since 12-31-2002!!
Kansas

#5 granny

 
granny

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 87 posts
 

Posted 07 January 2004 - 09:19 PM

Unfortunately, there are no substitutes that will work straight across the board for regular wheat flour, at least none that I know of. Rice flour is the most widely used in combination with the xanthan gum, but you often get better results using a combination of several flours.

My best suggestion is to mix your own flous and store them ready to use. For instance, Bette Hagman's featherlight mix works very well for most cookies, it's a combo of rice, tapioca and potato flour. I mix mine about 10# at a time and that lasts me a while. Then just use the amount called for in a standard recipe and add about 1 tsp xanthan gum depending on the recipe. It saves tons of time and saves pantry space instead of having 12 different containers of misc flours all over.

Hope this helps a little and good luck,
Kathleen

Kathleen,
If it's permissable, will you include the amounts of each flour in Betty Hagan's Featherlight mix. Like a cup of this and 1 1/2 c. of that. Every day I promise myself that I'll get one of her books from the library but haven't made it yet. I hear so much about her here and would love to try some of her stuff. Thanks, Granny
  • 0

#6 kejohe

 
kejohe

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts
 

Posted 08 January 2004 - 11:14 AM

Here you go:

Bette Hagman's Featherlight Mix (makes 12 Cups of mix)
4 C rice flour
4 C tapioca flour
4 C Cornstarch
4 Tbs potato flour

Bette Hagman's Gluten Free Mix (makes 12 Cups of mix)
8 C rice flour
2 2/3 C potato starch
1 1/3 C Tapioca flour

I miss typed earlier and didn't catch it until you quoted me, but the mixture that I use for most of my cookie recipes is the gluten free mix, not the featherlight. Sorry about that. Either will work, but using the featherlight I think is better for cakes and will tend to make cookies a little more crumbly. Either way though, they are both essential in my kitchen. Hope this is helpful and happy baking!
  • 0
Kathleen
Son has been gluten-free since December 2001

#7 granny

 
granny

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 87 posts
 

Posted 08 January 2004 - 09:33 PM

Here you go:

Bette Hagman's Featherlight Mix (makes 12 Cups of mix)

Bette Hagman's Gluten Free Mix (makes 12 Cups of mix)

Either will work, but using the featherlight I think is better for cakes and will tend to make cookies a little more crumbly. Either way though, they are both essential in my kitchen. Hope this is helpful and happy baking!

kathleen,
Thanks so much for the recipes. Granny
  • 0

#8 trummie

 
trummie

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
 

Posted 10 January 2004 - 07:06 PM

Thanks for posting the featherlight formula!
trummie
  • 0

#9 kejohe

 
kejohe

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts
 

Posted 11 January 2004 - 07:21 PM

No Problem, just keep in mind that the more you play around with your recipes the better they will get. For some things, I increase or decrease amounts depending on how long I want to cook it for or how crumbly or chewy I want it to be. Practice makes perfect!

Some tips (in my experience):
More cornstarch makes it crumble more
More tapioca makes it more gluey
More potato and/or rice will make it starchier

These are not hard a fast rules, but they seem to be true in most cases. :P
  • 0
Kathleen
Son has been gluten-free since December 2001

#10 trummie

 
trummie

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
 

Posted 04 February 2004 - 09:01 AM

Kejohe...I finally got out the recipe for the featherlight flour mixture and need to double check an ingredient. Is it four tablespoons of potato flour or potato starch?
Thanks....trummie
  • 0

#11 ROYAL BLUE

 
ROYAL BLUE

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts
 

Posted 04 February 2004 - 09:17 AM

It is potato flour

Tracy
  • 0

#12 aber

 
aber

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
 

Posted 31 March 2004 - 11:57 AM

Here you go:

Bette Hagman's Featherlight Mix (makes 12 Cups of mix)
4 C rice flour
4 C tapioca flour
4 C Cornstarch
4 Tbs potato flour

Can anyone confirm the typo in "The Gluten-Free Gourmet Makes Dessert", page 28, where the Featherlight Rice Flour Mix (Featherlight Mix) says 1 teaspoon per cup, but the examples show tablespoons instead?

I see from your quote that tablespoons might be the correct measure?

Dave
  • 0

#13 Laura

 
Laura

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 105 posts
 

Posted 31 March 2004 - 04:34 PM

Has anyone else found the Glutano brand gluten-free flour mix? I've only made one thing with it and that worked pretty well, but I haven't tested the mix enough to say much about it. And it's not cheap.

When I have some time, I make up big batches of different flour mixes and freeze them. That way I don't have to try to mix it each time I want to bake. I haven't tried the featherlight, but the Wendy Wark blend is really good. I found that it stays moist much longer than any other mix I've found, which is good since one of my big problems with gluten-free flours is that things go stale quickly.
  • 0

#14 angel_jd1

 
angel_jd1

    Gluten Free Goddess

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,053 posts
 

Posted 31 March 2004 - 06:07 PM

I keep all of my gluten free flours in the refrigerator. It seems to help them last a little longer for me.

-Jessica :rolleyes:
  • 0
Jessica
Gluten Free since 12-31-2002!!
Kansas

#15 justmel74

 
justmel74

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 32 posts
 

Posted 01 April 2004 - 12:28 PM

Bette also has a bean flour mix that works as well as the featherlight. I dont have my cookbook right now to give the ratios. But, you can buy the featherlight mix and the four flour (bean) mix from authentic foods (www.authenticfoods.com) if you dont feel like mixing it yourself. I know the gluten free mall (www.glutenfreemall.com) also sells these mixes, but it is more expensive than authentic foods. Authentic foods also has a good variety of other baking supplies (but not necessarily of pre-packaged gluten free products).
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: