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Coeliac And Sport


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33 replies to this topic

#1 markejt

 
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Posted 27 February 2004 - 03:53 AM

Hi everyone, I have just registered and this is my first post!

Firstly, I'm over in the UK, but that does not matter, what matters is trying to stay healthy and happy while on a Wheat, gluten and dairy free diet. I race bicycles; road and mountain, and find it pretty tough to keep my energy levels up and to perform if I'm feeling under the weather. If I have had a reaction to a food then I leave the bikes well alone and watch TV instead!!

Is anyone else undertaking high intensity sports and found a way to maintain energy levels?

I'm interested in pre-event carb loading and carb intake during activity. The race season has started already and I seem to be making a slow start!!

Help!

Thanks

Marke.
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#2 njlawtonuk@yahoo.co.uk

 
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Posted 02 March 2004 - 09:33 AM

hello marke & welcome to the board!!


i'm from the UK too!! what a coincidence!!!


i suffer the same problem when i run. not sure if this will help but have a read of article from the link below and try it out.


http://www.runnerswo...UAN=917&v=4&sp=

happy bicycling!
n.
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#3 pturse

 
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Posted 02 March 2004 - 10:29 AM

My issue is not keeping up energy when I exercise but something a little different.

I have been dx since last June and have truly been following the diet since Jan. 1, 2004 (I tried for 4 months before and gave up).

I am an avid runner but lately (especially the past 5 years) my digestive issues have become worse and worse to the point where I can't run a mile w/o the need to run home (if you know what I mean). It's really frustrating.

I have been following the diet and have still no luck. It's especially worse in the morning, which unfortunately is the only "free" time I have to run.

Has anyone else experienced this and does it get better the longer I am on the diet? I am a VERY active person and my digestive system just seems to not comply with my activity level any more. It was fine (fine but with serious digestive issues) when I was younger and in college (I am 27 now) but like I said, as I get older it seems that I can't run anymore because I need to stay closer to home.

I'd like to run my first marathon this December, and I was so close last year but this diet totally robbed my system at first so I decided to let my body heal.

I guess I am looking for any similiar stories or advice?

Thanks,

I love this board by the way. I learn something new everyday!!
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#4 jasa

 
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Posted 02 March 2004 - 11:32 AM

Hey all,

nice to see a load of other people from the UK using this board :)

Anyhow, I'm at university and a member of the rowing club - seriously intense sport... Over the past couple of years I've worked out what I can and can't eat to be able to cope with the exercise. 'Pturse', I know your problem, trust me - it'll be okay before too long.

Carbohydrates wise, there is 'vegetable rice pasta' - which, if you cook longer than it says on the back of the packet - is actually great. I also eat a tonne of rice and potatoes...
There are a load of special foods out there now, energy snack bars and the like. Some are quite expensive, but just before races I always think its good to stock up on them - is worth it.

Its a bit awkward for me being vegetarian on top of everything else, but I am getting by and coping with the exercise AND still able to build up and maintain muscle mass. I definitely end up getting my five fruits and veggies a day...

Not sure if you're meant to mention brand names and all that shenanigans on here but have seen other people have done so here goes, a few things I particularly like:
Onken Yogurt - loads of them are gluten free (and veggie).
Flapjack - check the standard stuff in supermarkets, loads is okay
Rice Cakes - with a tonne of chocolate spread :P
Organice cornflakes - let the milk soak in for a while though...

That lot, on top of bananas etc, is great.
Someone told me a while back that if your stomach is going through a 'crazy phase' to live off a diet of rice and bananas for a couple of days. Is very bland but has energy - and is actually some of the best advice I've seen on this board. Try that for a few days before throwing in a few more things.

Anyway - good luck all. I think supermarkets are getting the message and the 'free from' ranges are expanding... excellent news.

Take care,
Jasa
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#5 njlawtonuk@yahoo.co.uk

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 02:13 AM

hi pturse

have you tried tread mill running to retain your strength as well as being close to the "you know what". it might help your digestive system as well as your confidence to carry out a long run that are worry free.

i'm looking forward to doing my first competitive half marathon this year also. i'll be travelling abroad but i am worried that the food is not going to be safe or that i will simply starve for a week!

have you tried simple dextrose tablets. they provide energy and are not full of fibre. they are also (the brand i buy) are free from gluten and milk.

which is another point. you mention you are gluten free but have you tried excluding other food groups such as dairy? dairy allergies/intolerances from what i remember, have very similar effects to gluten.

i have a problem with rice also so i limit the amount of that i eat (i generally stick to chocolate rice cakes for a treat, but i can still only tolerate one per day).
it might be worth your while, as you have a long time before your marathon to try experiementing with other food exclusion diets.

well, hope this helps, good luck with the marathon. might see you at the NYM soon. nic
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#6 debmidge

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 02:45 AM

Marke
Best wishes to you for a successful run eventually. My husband has had celiac since he was 27 yrs. old but it wasn't diagnosed until he was 53 years old. Too much damage occured and it robbed him of his vitality because it was untreated (i.e., diet changes). I wish there was something I can add to the advice, but unfortunately I am new to all of this too (on my husband's behalf). I guess the only imput I can have is : see your gastro doctor regularly, stay on the gluten free diet, try an elimination diet to see if you have an allergy/resistance to another food such as soy, dairy or corn. It's hard to concentrate on the things you want to accomplish in life when you have to maintain a diet that takes up your time as if it was a second job.

Good luck!
Debmidge
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Husband has Celiac Disease and
Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -
The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis
Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,
most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as
being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."
Serious Depressive state ensued
Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003
Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.
Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle
Developed neuropathy in 2005
Now has lymphadema 2006
It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

#7 YankeeDB

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 07:51 AM

Just wanted to add a quick note that coconut oil (contains medium chain fatty acids) can be good for energy for those who are having trouble with fat absorption as it is absorbed through a different mechanism than other fats. This may be especially useful for those with the symptom of steatorrhea (frequent floating, malodorous, large, light colored stools if you'll pardon the graphic description!) Coconut oil may help with longer duration energy needs than glucose which is great for short bursts. It can be purchased online.
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#8 Guest_Libbyk_*

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 08:50 AM

I just wanted to post and say how nice it is to hear athletes posting. I was so weak when I was diagnosed all my major goals had flown right out the window. I don't know the majic answers, except eating as cleanly as humanly possible.

I am planning on doing a major 5 sport event in a couple months, but with good days and bad days, it is really hard to know if I am being realistic or not. I have also developed joint pain in the last month, so I am scared to run and hurt my knees.

you sporty types: do you just go out and hope for the best?
do you get frustated with your training losses when you are feeling too crummy to train?
have you re gained your strength?

Libby

PS, marke- I hated to do it, but when I cut dairy out, I felt a TON better. (damn.) It might help you, especially in the early stages of healing.
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#9 pturse

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 09:15 AM

Nic,

Thanks for the advice. I will have to try the Dextrose Tablets. Where would I buy them?
I do avoid dairy (lactose intolerant) and am also a vegetarian so my diet is crazy but I try not to have too many foods rich in fiber the night before I run . . . yet I still experience problems. I will have to give the dextrose tabs a try though.

Unfortunately, I don't have a treadmill but I may have to resort to buying one just for those "uncomfortable" mornings.

Good luck with your half marathon! I have to admit it is the greatest feeling when you finish. I never wanted to do a marathon until I finished my first half . . . and then that is all I want to do now. First I'll conquer the CIM (California International Marathon) and then perhaps the NYC! :)

Keep chugging everyone! I think exercise is good for the mind as well as the body and sometimes the only way to beat the feeling that having Celiac gives us it to just "sweat" it out a little.
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#10 YankeeDB

 
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Posted 03 March 2004 - 11:26 AM

I was never a super-athlete, but up until a few years ago, I danced, did aerobics, and strength-trained on a regular basis. I became too ill to exercise a few years ago but since diagnosis and going gluten-free, I'm optimistic I'll be able to start again. My own plan is to take it really slowly. I believe my body is damaged and malnourished from years of gluten ingestion so I need to build up gradually. Perhaps someone who is in better condition than me would not need to be so cautious. I guess the best bet is to let your body be your guide. If you feel fatigued, there's no need to push hard. The discipline of NOT exercising when your body needs to rest is just as important, IMO, as the discipline of regular exercise. Just my $.02, of course. :)
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#11 njlawtonuk@yahoo.co.uk

 
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Posted 04 March 2004 - 02:13 AM

hello pturse,

i'm determined to find the answer to your problem if its the last this i do!!!!

the dextrose tablets i buy are from a pharmacy, you should be able to find them there too. alternatively have a look at the article below...by mary poppins!!

http://www.runnerswo...UAN=917&v=4&sp=

also do you eat sea food and fish? i can only tolerate a very limited amount of fish these days, probably due to the amount i used to eat as a child! i don't eat it often usually as a treat, and only after exercise, never before beacuse of the cramps.

i used to be a vegetarian too but when i started restrictive dieting i found restaurants especially, were hard work and so frustrating. becasue i couldn't eat anything on the menu. i slowly began eating meat again after basically not having enough to eat!
i only eat poultry and all kinds of pig as i still hate the thought of all that blood in red meats...yuck!

i think i have mentioned this before but i'm a member of coeliac society in the UK. part of their membership entitiled you to a food and drink directory. this book is my bible, it lists every food and supermarket own brand food you can buy over here in the UK that are gluten free. i'm not too sure what the celiac society in the US provides but if they don't provide this service then push for it. it really does take the hassel out of shopping and guessing which foods are safe, (the ingrediatents lists on foods are always ambiguous). you can also write to your local supermarket for information on their own brand foods as they will have lists of their own for dairy, gluten and nut free foods.

one last thing do you take vitamin supplements? if so have you checked they are safe?

well, hope this helps, must get back to work. take care y'all, nic.
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#12 markejt

 
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Posted 04 March 2004 - 08:04 AM

Marke here again

Thanks for all the responses and comments. A few things - I am on a diary free diet and have been wheat, gluten and dairy free for four years. The main reason many feel totally weak and lifeless when going onto this diet is the removal of the major complex carbs that your body has got used to and this feeling is therefore a low blood sugar feeling, or at least, its lower than your body is used to. It takes 3-6 months for anyone's body to adapt (my eczema took 6 months to clear) so please, stick at it and don't cheat!!! You're only hurting yourself.

I do feel bad on some days but I am now so damn careful that it rarely stops me. I am cycling up to 150 miles /200kms per week and hope to start running again. I use a heart rate monitor and keep a diary of what I have eaten and how my training went and how I felt. I can usually do what I want.

Since my last post, I looked at my diet and realised a lot of my probelms were very simple - I just was not eating enough. Carbo loading for women has been shown in studies to be almost worthless, but vital for men due to differences in our metabolism and I just was not doing it. I am now and have to say I feel great.

I also take Vit C daily, drink aloe vera, take echinacea and others. I now they are helping as I can do all this and stay well!!

Earlier in the thread, Nic talked about dextrose tablets, these are made by principal sports and are gluten, yeast and lactose free, and do the job if you are well enough hydrated when you take them. If not I have found I feel more tired. They can also act as pick-me-up if my blood sugar is a little low.

Someone also aked if I just go out regardless of how I'm feeling and the answer is NO. too many people train for the sake of training or because they feel guilty if they rest. If you don't train on the day you feel bad then the next day when you are better you can train more effectively. Our immune systems are under pressure anyway, don't overdo it and make sure you have rest days in your training plan.

I think thats it for now, I have found a lot of this helpful, I'm just concerned about a ten day training camp I'm going to next week that is abroad . Asking someone to feed me for ten days is not fair on them and may not be good for me either!! Fingers crossed.

Marke.
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#13 markejt

 
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Posted 04 March 2004 - 08:11 AM

One more thing,

I don't wnat to upset anyone, but the vegetarians out there that are also on a restricted diet and exercising need to be very careful. Athletes need a little more protein in order to repair damaged tissue (this is how you build muscle - it breaks and repairs bigger and stronger) Unless you have enough good quality protein in your diet, your body will break itself down in order to use its own protein.

I'm not saying eat meat, thats up to you to decide, all I'm saying is get good quality protein into your body, especially in the form of soya. It will stop the weight loss and help give your body some of the fundamentals it needs for repairing itelf.

Bye for now

Marke.
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#14 pturse

 
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Posted 04 March 2004 - 10:08 AM

Nic,

Thanks for your concern & help. I appreciated it.

I don't eat fish but I do take vitamin supplements. I have checked and they are gluten free although I do need to check one again because now that I think of it, I think I missed checking it the first time!

I am lucky in that I live in California (orginally New Jersey) so being a vegetarian here is very easy. Restaurants are used to catering to us and there is an abundance of yummy ethnic foods like Mexican, Thai and others. Most restaurants are kind of enough to not include soy sauce and stuff too but you're right, most of the times it's hard.

I've been thinking about eating fish . . . although that was one "meat" my family never had growing up so I consequently never had it and quite frankly, the smell is enough to stear me away. My friends would love it if I would start eating chicken but for me it's more of a consistency issue . . .the texture of meat grosses me out and after 10 plus years of not eating . . . it's become more personal.

I did an experiment last night though. I didn't eat ANYTHING 2.5 - 3 hours before bed time (and I sleep 7+ hours). I woke up only feeling slightly "ill" but was able to manage a moderate run (but once I was home . . . my stomach was happy). So, in addition to trying the Dextrose Tabs, I plan on experimenting with my diet a little more. Perhaps my metabolism is just not up to speed anymore and it takes a while for me to digest??

I appreciate all the posts and concerns.
I have found on line a few postings of foods available from Safeway that are gluten-free, lists of restaurants that have gluten-free menus, and brand names that are gluten-free. My saving grace is a store called Whole Foods, they have the biggest selection. It would be nice to have it all in one book though instead of my make shift binder. :)

Thanks again everyone! I'll keep trying different things!

Back to work!
pturse:)
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#15 YankeeDB

 
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Posted 04 March 2004 - 10:40 AM

I decided to subscribe to Clan Thompson's pocket pc database of gluten-free/non-gluten-free (and vegetarian/non-veg) foods (he also has one for drugs). It has 3,000+ food items in it. So far it's been fairly useful, although there are thousands of foods not included. You can get a trial version for free to see how you like it. I think he has a PC-based version also.

(Off-topic aside: overall I like having a pocket pc--can play games in line at the market (where I am a frequent flyer these days!) or read ebooks or previously auto-downloaded news stories/weather reports. I also keep my calendar and address book there; it's backed up on my pc so there's less worry about loss. Also, it's password protected in case it fails in the wrong hands. I used maps of the metro and streets during a recent visit to DC. Many, many uses for this little guy....)

But back on the topic, if you don't like the prepackaged gluten-free database (which you can't add to or edit), it might be worthwhile to create your own using pocket excel or whatever. Again, it can be backed-up automatically on your pc. Just one more tool in our arsenal against the VILLI VILLAINS! :D
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